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Women Voting in Islam

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  • ReallyCurious
    replied
    Re: Women Voting in Islam

    Originally posted by Abu 'Abdullaah View Post
    Whoever is in power i.e. the government.
    Which must be empowered either by the democratic process or by force. I think we can all agree that the democratic process is the preferred alternative.

    Leave a comment:


  • ReallyCurious
    replied
    Re: Women Voting in Islam

    An interesting discussion which, in part, touches on issues raised on this thread.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfMqjbyGxzA

    Leave a comment:


  • fiazfatima
    replied
    Re: Women Voting in Islam

    women voting in islam. i think it is our mutual consedration (ajmah) is allowed to voting then it is allowed to voting for women..democracy in Islam is prevailed.so don't think that Islam is against democracy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Yezid
    replied
    Re: Women Voting in Islam

    Originally posted by Abu 'Abdullaah View Post
    Whoever is in power i.e. the government.
    how is the "government" designated ?

    Leave a comment:


  • Abu 'Abdullaah
    replied
    Re: Women Voting in Islam

    Originally posted by Yezid View Post
    "The State ?"

    who is "the State" ?
    Whoever is in power i.e. the government.

    Leave a comment:


  • Yezid
    replied
    Re: Women Voting in Islam

    Originally posted by Abu 'Abdullaah View Post
    Judges are usually appointed by the state..
    "The State ?"

    who is "the State" ?

    Leave a comment:


  • Abu 'Abdullaah
    replied
    Re: Women Voting in Islam

    Judges are usually appointed by the state.

    However, in civil disputes, two parties can agree on an arbitrator who can be independent from the state.

    Leave a comment:


  • reason12
    replied
    Re: Women Voting in Islam

    Originally posted by Abu 'Abdullaah View Post
    A faqih is only an authority in an 'academic' context. The authority can consult with the fuqaha before making a decision on law or policy. A faqih doesn't have the authority to decide law at state level.
    "rom where does a faqih, or any other person"

    Leave a comment:


  • Abu 'Abdullaah
    replied
    Re: Women Voting in Islam

    A faqih is only an authority in an 'academic' context. The authority can consult with the fuqaha before making a decision on law or policy. A faqih doesn't have the authority to decide law at state level.

    Leave a comment:


  • ReallyCurious
    replied
    Re: Women Voting in Islam

    Originally posted by Abu 'Abdullaah View Post
    Fiqh is not something that is not covered by Qur'an and Hadeeth.

    A Faqih isn't an appointment unless you mean a judge or mufti that rules in an 'official' legal capacity.
    My point was that, in response to an earlier comment that all cases of new legislation would be covered by fiqh, then it must be able to work outside the Quran in relation to technological advances or current affairs etc.
    From where does a faqih, or any other person able to make laws or pass judgements, get his authority? Someone must make these appointments. Where does that person get his authority?
    Again, it boils down to a choice between authoritarianism or democracy. There is no other way to run a society, and no one would argue that a dictatorship is preferable to democracy. Even for Muslims, a democracy is preferable, unless they just assume that their version of Islam will be the supreme power.

    Leave a comment:


  • Yezid
    replied
    Re: Women Voting in Islam

    Originally posted by Abukhalidz View Post
    and thats what fiqh is for
    fiqh is jurisprudence - this means, a collection of legal opinions which can act as a guideline for judges in administering justice

    nothing to do with legislating

    by the way, how are judges selected and designated ?

    Leave a comment:


  • Abu 'Abdullaah
    replied
    Re: Women Voting in Islam

    Originally posted by ReallyCurious View Post
    After a few hours reading up on fiqh, it is apparent that it is a man-made system, developed, amended and implemented by men (by definition, it covers what is not covered by the Quran and Hadith). We come back to the same question; who appoints the Faqih and who regulates their actions? It can only be a democracy or dictatorship. Either way, it is subject to the whims of men, not Allah.
    Fiqh is not something that is not covered by Qur'an and Hadeeth.

    A Faqih isn't an appointment unless you mean a judge or mufti that rules in an 'official' legal capacity.

    Leave a comment:


  • ReallyCurious
    replied
    Re: Women Voting in Islam

    Originally posted by Abukhalidz View Post
    and thats what fiqh is for
    Yes, but in practice, fiqh is just another word for the legislature and judiciary. Its purpose and function are the same. The Faqih still have to be appointed by some method and must have some sort of codified authority, otherwise one would have a system with competing codes (as is, in fact, the case historically. I believe there are 6 or 7 at present!)

    Leave a comment:


  • ReallyCurious
    replied
    Re: Women Voting in Islam

    Originally posted by Abukhalidz View Post
    Thats why one has to study fiqh and all its related branches.

    Again, Islam has the answer
    After a few hours reading up on fiqh, it is apparent that it is a man-made system, developed, amended and implemented by men (by definition, it covers what is not covered by the Quran and Hadith). We come back to the same question; who appoints the Faqih and who regulates their actions? It can only be a democracy or dictatorship. Either way, it is subject to the whims of men, not Allah.

    Leave a comment:


  • Abukhalidz
    replied
    Re: Women Voting in Islam

    Originally posted by Yezid View Post
    the idea that you can rule a contemporary State without a legislative body and without elections is very naive

    yes, you can have some sort of "dictatorship by divine right" as in the past, but those forms of government are disappearing fast - and not without reason
    and thats what fiqh is for

    Leave a comment:

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