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Hadhrat Sarah - a female companion of Prophet Muhammad?

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    Hadhrat Sarah - a female companion of Prophet Muhammad?

    I desperately need some some personal details from her life (when/how she converted, age, marriage, children, death etc.). I haven´t sadly been able to find anything about her online though.

    Anyone? Jazaakallah in advance.

    #2
    I think you mean Sarah(peace be upon her), the wife of Ibrahim(peace be upon him). As far as I know, the Prophet Muhammad(peace be upon him) did not have a female companion by that name.

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      #3
      Originally posted by OneLifeResults View Post
      I think you mean Sarah(peace be upon her), the wife of Ibrahim(peace be upon him). As far as I know, the Prophet Muhammad(peace be upon him) did not have a female companion by that name.
      I know about her though. I´ve been told by a few people that there was a female companion too by the same name. Maybe there wasn´t perhaps after all....

      Jazaakallah either way.

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        #4
        Originally posted by Ummati09 View Post
        I desperately need some some personal details from her life (when/how she converted, age, marriage, children, death etc.). I haven´t sadly been able to find anything about her online though.

        Anyone? Jazaakallah in advance.
        The best thing to do in this case is to search the books of Islam dedicated to the biographies and names of the Companions RA.

        Two that come to mind are al-Isaabah by Ibn Hajar al-Asqalani and al-Isti'aab by Ibn Abd al-Barr. There is also Usd al-Ghaabah by Ibn al-Atheer, however that is mostly reports on authority of Companions RA.

        I'll check them for you, In Sha' Allah, when I get a chance.

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          #5
          The only one I found was called Saarah, the freed slave of Amr bin Hashim bin al-Muttalib. Apparently the Prophet SAWS entrusted her with a book on the day of the conquest of Makkah.

          This was mentioned in the book al-Isaabah, volume 8, page 170, entry #11274

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            #6
            Originally posted by AbuNajm View Post
            The only one I found was called Saarah, the freed slave of Amr bin Hashim bin al-Muttalib. Apparently the Prophet SAWS entrusted her with a book on the day of the conquest of Makkah.

            This was mentioned in the book al-Isaabah, volume 8, page 170, entry #11274
            Jazaakallah brother! I´m so indebted to you for this favour. May Allah reward you for this; Aameen.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by AbuNajm View Post
              The only one I found was called Saarah, the freed slave of Amr bin Hashim bin al-Muttalib. Apparently the Prophet SAWS entrusted her with a book on the day of the conquest of Makkah.

              This was mentioned in the book al-Isaabah, volume 8, page 170, entry #11274
              A quick question brother, any idea which book it was that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allah be upon him) entrusted her with?

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Ummati09 View Post

                A quick question brother, any idea which book it was that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allah be upon him) entrusted her with?
                I had a chance to read a little more in the history books about Saarah, the freed slave of Amr bin Haashim, may Allah be pleased with her.

                After reading some more background, I realize that I misread the small entry in al-Isaabah that I originally quoted.

                The correct quote is as follows:

                "Saarah, a feed slave of Amr bin Haashim bin al-Muttalib, who had with her a letter of Haatib; the Prophet SAWS gave her a guarantee of security the day of the Conquest [of Makkah]..."

                It is called a Kitaab in the Hadith and above, however it refers to the letter that Haatib bin Balta'ah RA wrote in order to warn the Mushrikeen allies of the Quraysh about the plans of the Muslims to attack Makkah.

                The verb "Ammana" can mean "Waffara" or "to supply, provide", however here it clearly means "to grant security to", and in the context of war, it means "to give a guarantee of security". Also the verb "Ammana" has a pronoun indicating feminine singular "her/it" attached and this could not possibly refer to the word "Kitaab" since it is masculine.

                I don't know what I was thinking; my excuse was that I was reading a lot and quickly, and made the mistakes. My apologies.

                Some more information on Saarah RA:

                Tarikh at-Tabari relates from al-Waqidi that 4 women were ordered to be killed during the conquest, one of whom was Saarah and that she was killed the day of the conquest of Makkah. But at-Tabari also says that she was given a guarantee of security [see 3/60, under the chapter "Mention of the Reports About the Conquest of Makkah"].

                Discrepancies regarding whether someone was killed or whether they had survived the conquest of Makkah is not uncommon.

                Ibn Katheer mentions in al-Bidayat wan-Nihayah that Saarah was included as part of a group of women who came out with the Quraysh during battle of Badr and they were beating drums and singing satire/insults against the Muslims.

                In Maraat az-Zamaan, Sabt Ibn Jawzi includes Saarah among the list of women whose blood were made permissible by the Prophet SAWS during the conquest of Makkah. [see 4/87].

                I was able to confirm in al-Waqidi's book Maghaazi, volume 1, page 39 that Saarah was among the Qiyaan, or slaves who were set to sing insults against the Muslims during preparations for Badr.

                While searching for references to "Saarah" in al-Waqidis's book, I came across the Hadith regarding Haatib bin Balta'ah wherein he RA tried to warn the Quraysh about the plans of the Muslims to attack. It is at this point the author mentions that the woman he gave the letter to was Saarah. She was the one caught by az-Zubayr and Ali, may Allah be pleased with them both. Although some say the name of the woman from Muzaynah was Kanuud.

                It is this Hadith and the understanding that the woman who hid the letter of Haatib in her hair was Saarah, that the author of al-Isaabah says she was the one who had Haatib's letter with her. I'm not sure whether it was this act of helping the Mushrikeen against the Muslims with Haatib's letter or helping encourage the Quraysh Mushrikeen against the Muslims with singing insults during the battle of Badr that got her on the kill list and then subsequently saved from it.

                Regardless, she RA is listed as a Companion and they were the best of creation among the non-Prophets and non-Messengers, so their status and reward is far greater than ours ever could be and we ask Allah AWJ to be pleased with her and all the Companions. Ameen.

                Again, my apologies about the confusion.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by AbuNajm View Post

                  I had a chance to read a little more in the history books about Saarah, the freed slave of Amr bin Haashim, may Allah be pleased with her.

                  After reading some more background, I realize that I misread the small entry in al-Isaabah that I originally quoted.

                  The correct quote is as follows:

                  "Saarah, a feed slave of Amr bin Haashim bin al-Muttalib, who had with her a letter of Haatib; the Prophet SAWS gave her a guarantee of security the day of the Conquest [of Makkah]..."

                  It is called a Kitaab in the Hadith and above, however it refers to the letter that Haatib bin Balta'ah RA wrote in order to warn the Mushrikeen allies of the Quraysh about the plans of the Muslims to attack Makkah.

                  The verb "Ammana" can mean "Waffara" or "to supply, provide", however here it clearly means "to grant security to", and in the context of war, it means "to give a guarantee of security". Also the verb "Ammana" has a pronoun indicating feminine singular "her/it" attached and this could not possibly refer to the word "Kitaab" since it is masculine.

                  I don't know what I was thinking; my excuse was that I was reading a lot and quickly, and made the mistakes. My apologies.

                  Some more information on Saarah RA:

                  Tarikh at-Tabari relates from al-Waqidi that 4 women were ordered to be killed during the conquest, one of whom was Saarah and that she was killed the day of the conquest of Makkah. But at-Tabari also says that she was given a guarantee of security [see 3/60, under the chapter "Mention of the Reports About the Conquest of Makkah"].

                  Discrepancies regarding whether someone was killed or whether they had survived the conquest of Makkah is not uncommon.

                  Ibn Katheer mentions in al-Bidayat wan-Nihayah that Saarah was included as part of a group of women who came out with the Quraysh during battle of Badr and they were beating drums and singing satire/insults against the Muslims.

                  In Maraat az-Zamaan, Sabt Ibn Jawzi includes Saarah among the list of women whose blood were made permissible by the Prophet SAWS during the conquest of Makkah. [see 4/87].

                  I was able to confirm in al-Waqidi's book Maghaazi, volume 1, page 39 that Saarah was among the Qiyaan, or slaves who were set to sing insults against the Muslims during preparations for Badr.

                  While searching for references to "Saarah" in al-Waqidis's book, I came across the Hadith regarding Haatib bin Balta'ah wherein he RA tried to warn the Quraysh about the plans of the Muslims to attack. It is at this point the author mentions that the woman he gave the letter to was Saarah. She was the one caught by az-Zubayr and Ali, may Allah be pleased with them both. Although some say the name of the woman from Muzaynah was Kanuud.

                  It is this Hadith and the understanding that the woman who hid the letter of Haatib in her hair was Saarah, that the author of al-Isaabah says she was the one who had Haatib's letter with her. I'm not sure whether it was this act of helping the Mushrikeen against the Muslims with Haatib's letter or helping encourage the Quraysh Mushrikeen against the Muslims with singing insults during the battle of Badr that got her on the kill list and then subsequently saved from it.

                  Regardless, she RA is listed as a Companion and they were the best of creation among the non-Prophets and non-Messengers, so their status and reward is far greater than ours ever could be and we ask Allah AWJ to be pleased with her and all the Companions. Ameen.

                  Again, my apologies about the confusion.
                  This is wonderful! Way, way more than I could´ve asked for!

                  Jazaakallah brother for such a detailed write-up to kind of quench my thirst of wanting to know about her. May Allah bless you in the years to come; Aameen.

                  And no, no need to apologise on the confusion, for you´ve more than made up for it through this post of yours. Thanks man!

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