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How to Learn Arabic

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  • How to Learn Arabic

    Arabic (اللغة العربية) is an Afro-Asian or Semitic language closely related to Maltese, Hebrew, and Aramaic, as well as Tigrinya and Amharic. It is spoken in a wide range of colorful dialects. Arabic is the official language of 26 countries in the Middle East and North Africa, from Yemen to Lebanon, from Sudan to Tunisia, and is an official language of the Arab League, the African Union, NATO, and the United Nations, as well as liturgy. and intellectual language of Islam. All over the world, people study Arabic for a variety of reasons: work, travel, family, heritage, religion, want to travel to an Arab country, get married or unite with an Arab, or just as a hobby. To learn Arabic, determine the type you want to learn, study the alphabet, get a good Arabic dictionary and use key language learning tools.

    Part 1- Which Arab do you want to learn?

    Know that there are several types of Arabic. These are modern standard Arabic, classical Arabic (Quranic) or spoken Arabic. Decide what kind of Arabic you want to learn:

    Modern standard Arabic. Unless your interest is limited to one particular country, the safest option is to learn a version of the classic language known as modern standard Arabic. The MSA is used in the Arab world but is generally limited to writing and formal contexts: literature, newspapers, education, radio/television news programs, political speeches, etc.

    Classical Arabic (Quranic). If your interest is more specific to Islamic or medieval Arabic studies, a Quranic / Classical Arabic course will meet your needs. It is Arabic used in the Quran, Arabic of classical religious, intellectual and legal texts, and Arabic from which modern standard Arabic is based.


    Colloquial Arabic. If you are planning to live in the Arab world or deal with a specific Arab region or country, standard modern Arabic alone will probably not meet all your needs. Arabs speak regional dialects as their mother tongue and differences between dialects may be important enough to cause mutual unintelligibility. Generally, there are five major dialect families, each with sub-dialects depending on the country, city, neighborhood, and even religion: Gulf Arabic, Mesopotamian Arabic, Levantine Arabic, Egyptian Arabic, and Maghrebian Arabic.


    Part 2- Understanding the alphabet and dictionary

    1- Learn the Arabic alphabet. Arabic writing seems daunting at first, and some people try to avoid learning it by relying on transliterations of Arabic words. These only stores problems for later; it is best to ignore the transliterations and use the script from the beginning. Your best option is to borrow a book from your local library or bookstore because it is a long and difficult project.


    2- Learn how to use an Arabic dictionary. The words of the Arabic dictionaries are normally listed under their three-letter roots. So, you would look for Istiqbaal ("reception") under "q" because the root letters are q-b-l. It takes some practice to get used to it, but it is not particularly difficult because the additions to the roots follow established patterns. Something similar happens in English: "unaccustomed", for example, is actually "un-a-custom-ed".


    Part 3- Studying Arabic


    1- Learn at home. If you are able to study at home, there are self-study courses that will guide you through the beginner stage and maybe even a little beyond. The quality of conventional textbook and tape courses varies, as do their teaching methods. You can find yourself buying two or three before finding the one that suits you.


    2- Think about online courses. If you want to learn Arabic on the Internet, the following courses are available:
    BABEL Arabic [1] is an interactive course for beginners with text, sound, transcriptions, and translations. He teaches writing and reading as conversations.
    The tutor in Arabic is a beginner's course on CD-ROM that can be sampled and purchased on the Internet.
    Learning Arabic is basic Arabic for French speakers.


    3- Try language classes. For most people, part-time evening classes may be the most accessible option. They can provide a serene introduction to the language, but do not expect to learn very fast. Try to find out what options you have in the area where you live.


    4- Practice your Arabic and befriend Arabic speakers. The Arab diaspora spreads to the four corners of the world. The best way to develop your Arabic is to speak with the Arabs and expose yourself to everything Arab. Join pen pal sites, listen to Arabic music, watch Arabic soap operas, news and children's shows, chat with your local Palestinian barber, Moroccan grocer, Lebanese restaurateur, and more. To know a few words opens the door.

    Find someone who speaks Arabic. You could have someone in your family or in your group of friends. You can also ask on Facebook if someone knows someone speaking Arabic.
    Contact the person and ask them to meet once a week for an hour. You can focus on words, such as words related to life, travel, etc.
    At the same time, focus on the basic sentences, the pieces already prepared, such as how you go, my name is, how old are you, etc. You can also sort them into different categories.
    In the meantime, study the points of language discussed with your tutor. At your next meeting, you will better understand and understand the language. You can also ask questions about previous lessons.


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    Last edited by Salsabil Fouad; 05-02-19, 04:06 PM.

  • #2
    I want to learn Arabic so I can understand Qur'aan and also listen to lectures which are in Arabic. So either Modern Standard Arabic or Classical Qur'aanic Arabic would probably be best - what do you recommend?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by AnonymousUser View Post
      I want to learn Arabic so I can understand Qur'aan and also listen to lectures which are in Arabic. So either Modern Standard Arabic or Classical Qur'aanic Arabic would probably be best - what do you recommend?
      Classical

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by AnonymousUser View Post
        I want to learn Arabic so I can understand Qur'aan and also listen to lectures which are in Arabic. So either Modern Standard Arabic or Classical Qur'aanic Arabic would probably be best - what do you recommend?
        If you are interested in studying with an online institution, then the following are recommended.

        1) Intensive Arabic Program with Islamic Online University.

        2) Arabic with Husna - Nouman Ali Khan's Online Program.

        3) Arabic with Madeenah University Program.

        With all of the above - you buy the books and use online videos to go through with them. Apart from the first one, where you sit actual exams too as you go along.¬*


        ¬*

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