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  • What books to self-study Classical/Quranic Arabic, from beginner to advanced?

    i'd like to self study classical/quranic arabic in english in my own time. i did study some arabic when i was bout 11-12 in an evening madrasah, but then i went off deen and forgot everythting. now, alhamdulillah, im a little more practicing and would like to get back into it
    okay im gonna present the rest of my question better than this so its easy to read and understand so please give me a similar answer if u ple. jzk
    _____

    What books should I study and in what order, to learn ALL the grammar right from the beginner to the very advanced?
    When I was young, I saw these books and studied about half of each before I left: Arbi ka mu'allim - Ilmun-Nahw - Tamreenun-Nahw - Ilmus-Sarf - Qasasun-Nabiyyeen - Darsul-lughatil-arabiyyah (bear in mind, I want to start from scratch)
    Btw, I don't understand much urdu, but our teachers used to guide us obviously.

    Now, however I've come across Arabic Tutor (translation of Arbi ka mu'allim) and Tasheel al-Nahw (translation of Ilmun-Nahw), but should I study both these books or just one them? What's the difference? What do they cover? What should I study afterwards?
    I've also got a book called Tawdeehun-Nahw - A Simplified Arabic Grammar by Moulana Hasan Dockrat. It seems a little more complicated than both above books, but - if you happen to know - how is it different, is it more comprehensive?
    And how about the Madinah course available online, that include Darsul-lughah and the English key which explains the grammar; how much grammar does it explain? I want to know all
    And I understand that Hidayatun-Nahw is more advanced and I should study it once I complete one of the other more beginner books but after studying Hidayatun-Nahw, is that it? Is that all I need to learn or is there more? Is there an alternative to Hidayatun-Nahw?

    And what about in terms of Sarf; where does that come in? I've seen Treasures of Arabic Morphology by Zam-Zam publishers. Should I study that or is there a better sarf book in English? Is there no translation of Ilmus-Sarf just like there is for Ilmun-Nahw?
    What way do I study sarf siding with the nahw?


    I know there's a lot to answer and I've asked a lot, but it would be a great deal if all these questions were to be answered. I have an intention to make the best book/books for English-speaking students that cover everything after I finish studying, so that future people don't need to go haadhaa ila dhaalik ila haadhaa

    Jazakallah khair.

  • #2
    Re: What books to self-study Classical/Quranic Arabic, from beginner to advanced?

    As salaamu alaykum respected brother.

    I myself have been doing something similar on and off the last few years. Given that, before I say anything else I can say that "learning on your own" is much less efficient than enrolling in something like the Shariah Program but it can still be done and when you do learn, in my opinion, you MIGHT have a certain advantage both in terms of thawaab/ajr given the difficulty you might encounter and, furthermore, given that you will learn the "hard way" certain lessons may forever stick in a way that they might not for other students.

    Anyways....

    In my answer to your question, I will restrict myself to those materials, resources, etc. that can be obtained freely online. If you want another answer or suggested path that might incorporate other materials as well, please say so and I will do my best to share my suggestions.

    PHASE I (the outline of the Foundation) [4-5 weeks]

    1) Book 1 of the Madinah Series with the aid of the videos on this websites: www.lqtoronto.com
    2) The Book, "Fundamentals of Classical Arabic: volume 1"

    The videos for the Madinah books on that website are recordings of a live class that was taught in the year 2008. If you follow a schedule of doing one class session a day, four (4) days a week, you should finish book/volume 1 in 4-5 weeks as it was covered in 18 sessions (if I'm not mistaken).
    Follow the lessons to a "T" and do EVERYTHING SINLGE I'RAAB (i.e. "syntactic parsing") exercise that Brother Asif (the instructor) walks you through; you will do hundreds (and it will pay dividends later).

    In addition, do the "Fundamentals of Classical Arabic" book concurrently, however, you will be primarily concerned with MEMORIZING the VERB TABLES in the book; MEMORIZE EACH ONE! Be able to say them in your sleep. Know them like you know your own name. The most effective method that I found for memorizing them was to do the following:

    Recite the table about 20-30 times from beginning to end while looking at it in the book. Then, attempt to close your eyes and recite the first two or three conjugations from memory and then open up your eyes and read from the book to complete the table. Then, after about 10-12 times of doing this, attempt to recite the first 7-9 conjugations from memory and then look at conjugations 8-14 to complete the recitation of the table. After doing so another 10-12 times, you should be able to recite the table with your eyes closed, if not, recite it in the aforementioned fashion a few more times till you able to recite it from beginning to end with your eyes closed. Upon finding yourself able to do so, proceed to recite the table with your eyes closed 150 times! You may find that every now and then you might get tongue-tied or forget and need to look into the book; that is Okay BUT do not count any full recitation of the table where you needed to look into the book to complete it. Remember, 150 recitations of the table with your eyes closed. The following day, recite the SAME TABLE from memory another 150 times. Then the following day move on to the next table. I myself would only memorize two tables a week (which meant that the three days that I wasn't doing the Madinah Book videos I would be memorizing verb tables and then there would be only one day during the week where I did BOTH a Madinah Book video and a verb recitation session).

    I cannot emphasize how important the memorization of those tables are. You should not, under any circumstances, move on to Book 2 of the Madinah series until you have FIRMLY memorized every table in the book "Fundamentals of Classical Arabic: Volume 1."

    If you want to do any review of the material studied in this phase before going on to Book 2 of the Madinah Books, just read the english answer key of the series for Book 1 at a leisurely pace over the course of a week; that should be more than sufficient.

    PHASE II (Broadening the Foundation) [8-9 weeks]

    1) Book 2 of the Madinah Series again with the aid of the videos on www.lqtoronto.com

    Follow the same schedule of 4 days on, 3 days off. Remember, now you will be exposed to nearly all of the bare essentials of Nahw and a significant portion of Sarf. To put things into context, as far as Nahw goes, you will now have studied approximately all that which the famed "Ajurumiyyah" contains. As far as Sarf goes, if my memory serves me correctly, you will have about a 70% understanding of Ajwaf verbs and a thorough introduction to Naaqis verbs. Just finish this book and understand EVERYTHING that you go over during class and you'll be in much better shape than others who have plodded along in the language for 2 years or so who have used other means. I would dare say that, with the exception of Vocabulary, you will be in a much better position than many who study Arabic for 2 years in a Western University.

    PHASE III (Strengthening the Foundations and Filling in the Gaps) [2-4 weeks]

    1) All the Arabic You should Have Learned the First Time Around: Part 1
    2) From the Treasures of Arabic Morphology: Pages 1-90

    Do both of the above books CONCURRENTLY.

    In this phase, you will not only be reviewing much of what you've already learned but you will be filling in gaps. The book "All the Arabic You should have Learned the First Time Around" is really an overlooked treasure. If you read the content complete ALL the exercises in Part I, you will thoroughly remember all the wierd spelling and orthographic rules as well as nearly all the essential (non-verb related) grammar in the language. But remember, most of it will be review since you will have covered it in the Madinah series but reviewing or re-learning material through a different medium is often VERY EFFECTIVE and much more so than redoing the same material over again. In addition, the selected pages (noted above) of "From the Treasures of Arabic Morphology" will mostly be review, however, it will be an ESSENTIAL review because in the next phase you will be going at so-called "irregular verbs" (the bane of every Arabic student's existence) in a big way so there must be NO WEAKNESS in your understanding of regular verbs (which will serve as your reference point when learning about what makes irregular verbs like the mahmooz, muda'af, ajwaf, naaqis, lafeef, etc. different).

    Do not try to rush this phase so if it does, indeed, take you the full 4 weeks to go through the above-mentioned material, then so be it. Furthermore, any new vocab that you come across should be looked up in the dictionary and then memorized.

    PHASE IV (completing the core 80% of the language) [12-20 weeks]

    1) All the Arabic You Should have Learned the First Time Around: Part 2 (entitled "Verbally Speaking")
    2) Arabic Tutor (aka "Arbi Ka Muallim") volumes 1-3 (compromising lessons 1-44 of the entire series)

    Do both of the above sets of material concurrently, though you might want to pause at lesson 37 of Arabic Tutor until you completely finish "Part 2" of "All the Arabic You should Have Learned the First Time Around" as the discussion of "baabs" or "Verb Paradigms" or "Verb Forms" is a bit more clear (in my opinion at any rate) in the latter as opposed to the former.

    Make sure that you continue to try to memorize the new vocab you come across in "All the Arabic You Should Have Learned the First Time Around" and the vocab in the vocabulary lists in "Arabic Tutor." In addition, make sure that you can reproduce the "I'raab" examples that you come across in Arabic Tutor. I would actually suggest writing out those examples and trying to reproduce the analysis the next day without looking at the book. Furthermore, I repeat, do EVERY SINGLE EXERCISE in both series.

    Once you graduate from this phase, truthfully, you should have a near complete mastery of verbs, a decent working vocabulary to begin reading without being frustrated on every page for lack of vocabulary, and you should be about 80% of the way towards your ultimate goal.

    PHASE V (completing Nahw)

    1) Arabic Tutor Volume 4
    2) All the Arabic You Should have Learned the First Time Around: Part 3

    Once you finish this phase, you will have completed all the rules of nahw contained in the book "Hidayatun Nahw." This is very significant given that more than one scholar from the Indian sub-continent has remarked that "Nahw is complete upon the Hidaayatun Nahw" or, as Mufti Yusuf Mullan of the Shariah Program once said, "If you understand the book Hidaayatun Nahw from cover to cover, you will not need another book in Nahw."

    However, this is not to say that you will now just be able to pick up cryptic texts like the Mukhtasar Ma'ani or Al Kafiyah, etc. and read them with no difficulty and the like; far from it given that reading itself is a different skill. Furthermore, even as far as Nahw goes, though you may not have much more as far as rules go to learn for your purposes (i.e. to read Tafsirs, classical Islamic texts, and modern books), but that is not to say that there isn't anything to be learned from more advanced study.

    Regardless, I think that this post has probably answered your question(s) insha'allah. If not, please reply and I will do my best to further clarify by the Will of Allah.

    Wa'salaam.
    Last edited by Sunni_Student78; 04-05-14, 10:22 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: What books to self-study Classical/Quranic Arabic, from beginner to advanced?

      Originally posted by Sunni_Student78 View Post
      As salaamu alaykum respected brother.

      I myself have been doing something similar on and off the last few years. Given that, before I say anything else I can say that "learning on your own" is much less efficient than enrolling in something like the Shariah Program but it can still be done and when you do learn, in my opinion, you MIGHT have a certain advantage both in terms of thawaab/ajr given the difficulty you might encounter and, furthermore, given that you will learn the "hard way" certain lessons may forever stick in a way that they might not for other students.

      Anyways....

      In my answer to your question, I will restrict myself to those materials, resources, etc. that can be obtained freely online. If you want another answer or suggested path that might incorporate other materials as well, please say so and I will do my best to share my suggestions.

      PHASE I (the outline of the Foundation) [4-5 weeks]

      1) Book 1 of the Madinah Series with the aid of the videos on this websites: www.lqtoronto.com
      2) The Book, "Fundamentals of Classical Arabic: volume 1"

      The videos for the Madinah books on that website are recordings of a live class that was taught in the year 2008. If you follow a schedule of doing one class session a day, four (4) days a week, you should finish book/volume 1 in 4-5 weeks as it was covered in 18 sessions (if I'm not mistaken).
      Follow the lessons to a "T" and do EVERYTHING SINLGE I'RAAB (i.e. "syntactic parsing") exercise that Brother Asif (the instructor) walks you through; you will do hundreds (and it will pay dividends later).

      In addition, do the "Fundamentals of Classical Arabic" book concurrently, however, you will be primarily concerned with MEMORIZING the VERB TABLES in the book; MEMORIZE EACH ONE! Be able to say them in your sleep. Know them like you know your own name. The most effective method that I found for memorizing them was to do the following:

      Recite the table about 20-30 times from beginning to end while looking at it in the book. Then, attempt to close your eyes and recite the first two or three conjugations from memory and then open up your eyes and read from the book to complete the table. Then, after about 10-12 times of doing this, attempt to recite the first 7-9 conjugations from memory and then look at conjugations 8-14 to complete the recitation of the table. After doing so another 10-12 times, you should be able to recite the table with your eyes closed, if not, recite it in the aforementioned fashion a few more times till you able to recite it from beginning to end with your eyes closed. Upon finding yourself able to do so, proceed to recite the table with your eyes closed 150 times! You may find that every now and then you might get tongue-tied or forget and need to look into the book; that is Okay BUT do not count any full recitation of the table where you needed to look into the book to complete it. Remember, 150 recitations of the table with your eyes closed. The following day, recite the SAME TABLE from memory another 150 times. Then the following day move on to the next table. I myself would only memorize two tables a week (which meant that the three days that I wasn't doing the Madinah Book videos I would be memorizing verb tables and then there would be only one day during the week where I did BOTH a Madinah Book video and a verb recitation session).

      I cannot emphasize how important the memorization of those tables are. You should not, under any circumstances, move on to Book 2 of the Madinah series until you have FIRMLY memorized every table in the book "Fundamentals of Classical Arabic: Volume 1."

      If you want to do any review of the material studied in this phase before going on to Book 2 of the Madinah Books, just read the english answer key of the series for Book 1 at a leisurely pace over the course of a week; that should be more than sufficient.

      PHASE II (Broadening the Foundation) [8-9 weeks]

      1) Book 2 of the Madinah Series again with the aid of the videos on www.lqtoronto.com

      Follow the same schedule of 4 days on, 3 days off. Remember, now you will be exposed to nearly all of the bare essentials of Nahw and a significant portion of Sarf. To put things into context, as far as Nahw goes, you will now have studied approximately all that which the famed "Ajurumiyyah" contains. As far as Sarf goes, if my memory serves me correctly, you will have about a 70% understanding of Ajwaf verbs and a thorough introduction to Naaqis verbs. Just finish this book and understand EVERYTHING that you go over during class and you'll be in much better shape than others who have plodded along in the language for 2 years or so who have used other means. I would dare say that, with the exception of Vocabulary, you will be in a much better position than many who study Arabic for 2 years in a Western University.

      PHASE III (Strengthening the Foundations and Filling in the Gaps) [2-4 weeks]

      1) All the Arabic You should Have Learned the First Time Around: Part 1
      2) From the Treasures of Arabic Morphology: Pages 1-90

      Do both of the above books CONCURRENTLY.

      In this phase, you will not only be reviewing much of what you've already learned but you will be filling in gaps. The book "All the Arabic You should have Learned the First Time Around" is really an overlooked treasure. If you read the content complete ALL the exercises in Part I, you will thoroughly remember all the wierd spelling and orthographic rules as well as nearly all the essential (non-verb related) grammar in the language. But remember, most of it will be review since you will have covered it in the Madinah series but reviewing or re-learning material through a different medium is often VERY EFFECTIVE and much more so than redoing the same material over again. In addition, the selected pages (noted above) of "From the Treasures of Arabic Morphology" will mostly be review, however, it will be an ESSENTIAL review because in the next phase you will be going at so-called "irregular verbs" (the bane of every Arabic student's existence) in a big way so there must be NO WEAKNESS in your understanding of regular verbs (which will serve as your reference point when learning about what makes irregular verbs like the mahmooz, muda'af, ajwaf, naaqis, lafeef, etc. different).

      Do not try to rush this phase so if it does, indeed, take you the full 4 weeks to go through the above-mentioned material, then so be it. Furthermore, any new vocab that you come across should be looked up in the dictionary and then memorized.

      PHASE IV (completing the core 80% of the language) [12-20 weeks]

      1) All the Arabic You Should have Learned the First Time Around: Part 2 (entitled "Verbally Speaking")
      2) Arabic Tutor (aka "Arbi Ka Muallim") volumes 1-3 (compromising lessons 1-44 of the entire series)

      Do both of the above sets of material concurrently, though you might want to pause at lesson 37 of Arabic Tutor until you completely finish "Part 2" of "All the Arabic You should Have Learned the First Time Around" as the discussion of "baabs" or "Verb Paradigms" or "Verb Forms" is a bit more clear (in my opinion at any rate) in the latter as opposed to the former.

      Make sure that you continue to try to memorize the new vocab you come across in "All the Arabic You Should Have Learned the First Time Around" and the vocab in the vocabulary lists in "Arabic Tutor." In addition, make sure that you can reproduce the "I'raab" examples that you come across in Arabic Tutor. I would actually suggest writing out those examples and trying to reproduce the analysis the next day without looking at the book. Furthermore, I repeat, do EVERY SINGLE EXERCISE in both series.

      Once you graduate from this phase, truthfully, you should have a near complete mastery of verbs, a decent working vocabulary to begin reading without being frustrated on every page for lack of vocabulary, and you should be about 80% of the way towards your ultimate goal.

      PHASE V (completing Nahw)

      1) Arabic Tutor Volume 4
      2) All the Arabic You Should have Learned the First Time Around: Part 3

      Once you finish this phase, you will have completed all the rules of nahw contained in the book "Hidayatun Nahw." This is very significant given that more than one scholar from the Indian sub-continent has remarked that "Nahw is complete upon the Hidaayatun Nahw" or, as Mufti Yusuf Mullan of the Shariah Program once said, "If you understand the book Hidaayatun Nahw from cover to cover, you will not need another book in Nahw."

      However, this is not to say that you will now just be able to pick up cryptic texts like the Mukhtasar Ma'ani or Al Kafiyah, etc. and read them with no difficulty and the like; far from it given that reading itself is a different skill. Furthermore, even as far as Nahw goes, though you may not have much more as far as rules go to learn for your purposes (i.e. to read Tafsirs, classical Islamic texts, and modern books), but that is not to say that there isn't anything to be learned from more advanced study.

      Regardless, I think that this post has probably answered your question(s) insha'allah. If not, please reply and I will do my best to further clarify by the Will of Allah.

      Wa'salaam.

      JazakAllah Khair...

      v helpful.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: What books to self-study Classical/Quranic Arabic, from beginner to advanced?

        Jazakallah for such an extensive answer. I really appreciate it and I'm sure it will help whoever lands on this thread.
        I would probably do it this way if I were studying by myself, but I'm studying with my friends who are also beginner's because truth is, I won't stick to it if I had to do it myself. We will consult a teacher from time to time regarding things we aren't very clear about. I've decided to study the books: Tasheel al-Nahw + Hidayatun-Nahw for the Nahw part ...and... Fundamentals of Classical Arabic + Treasure of Arabic Morphology in regards to Sarf. The Madinah series looks unnecessarily long and boring, especially if you're staring at a screen for so long.

        Also, do you know where I can learn vocab from. Are there any books that give the most used vocab? Kinda like an arabic dictionary, only in order of most-used as opposed to the alphabet. I find it funny that there are all these learning arabic books but I can't find a good vocab list.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: What books to self-study Classical/Quranic Arabic, from beginner to advanced?

          I am doing the Madinah Arabic Books series at LQToronto.

          Very boring, but you learn a lot and it is very easy - the teacher does a very good job, but keeps repeating too many times.

          Almost finished book 2.

          Started the series like 2 months ago.

          But I recommend this very much, a revert brother who did this course, who is now able to read classical books and understand, showed me these and was inspired by him. There are also many good reviews on these books too.

          You will be able to learn about 3,000 words from these books. Which is a lot actually, when you use different verb forms, add pronouns, etc.

          This tool I have found very helpful: http://aratools.com/

          Don't be discouraged, if your purpose is to seek the pleasure of Allah, then know that, Allah said:


          وَلَقَدْ يَسَّرْنَا ٱلْقُرْءَانَ لِلذِّكْرِ
          Last edited by sliceruk; 10-05-14, 09:08 AM.

          http://quran.cc/images/Quranlogo.png........http://i.imgur.com/b066ayL.png

          "A person deprives himself of performing Tahajjud by committing sins." - Hasan al Basri

          When you are obedient to Allah do not feel humiliation and do not feel as though you are weak and if the whole world, and trials surround the people , then know, that you are the dearest to Allah and if they feel rich with the dunya then know that you will be content of Allah and if they seek glory by disobeying Allah, know that glory is reached through obedience. Do not feel weakness, emptiness or failure. Don't lose hope and don't be sad. Be with Allah, the Glorified, the Most High. Even if all the calamities in the world befell you. For what is with Allah is greater than what you can imagine.
          - Al Shinqitee

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: What books to self-study Classical/Quranic Arabic, from beginner to advanced?

            Jazakallah

            Isn't there a place for just vocabs or even a collection of all the arabic words from the madinah books?
            Also, what's the best arabic-english dictionary. I've got hans wehr and al-mawrid looks really different from it. idk how. i think hans wehr focuses on the verbs or summin
            And are there any good english- arabic dictionaries. i'm surprised i can't find any

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: What books to self-study Classical/Quranic Arabic, from beginner to advanced?

              Originally posted by ZakirAhmed View Post
              Jazakallah

              Isn't there a place for just vocabs or even a collection of all the arabic words from the madinah books?
              Also, what's the best arabic-english dictionary. I've got hans wehr and al-mawrid looks really different from it. idk how. i think hans wehr focuses on the verbs or summin
              And are there any good english- arabic dictionaries. i'm surprised i can't find any
              HANS Wehr is the best, it is recommended by Shaykh Abdur Rahim too (not certain though)

              As for the Vocab from Madinah Arabic Series, here is the Glossary: http://www.lqtoronto.com/madinaglossary.html

              As I progress, I add the words in here: http://quizlet.com/codingsquared/folders

              You can learn the Vocab through different methods on Quizlet.

              http://quran.cc/images/Quranlogo.png........http://i.imgur.com/b066ayL.png

              "A person deprives himself of performing Tahajjud by committing sins." - Hasan al Basri

              When you are obedient to Allah do not feel humiliation and do not feel as though you are weak and if the whole world, and trials surround the people , then know, that you are the dearest to Allah and if they feel rich with the dunya then know that you will be content of Allah and if they seek glory by disobeying Allah, know that glory is reached through obedience. Do not feel weakness, emptiness or failure. Don't lose hope and don't be sad. Be with Allah, the Glorified, the Most High. Even if all the calamities in the world befell you. For what is with Allah is greater than what you can imagine.
              - Al Shinqitee

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: What books to self-study Classical/Quranic Arabic, from beginner to advanced?

                Originally posted by ZakirAhmed View Post
                ...
                I would probably do it this way if I were studying by myself, but I'm studying with my friends who are also beginner's because truth is, I won't stick to it if I had to do it myself. We will consult a teacher from time to time regarding things we aren't very clear about.
                Good.

                Originally posted by ZakirAhmed View Post
                I've decided to study the books: Tasheel al-Nahw + Hidayatun-Nahw for the Nahw part ...and... Fundamentals of Classical Arabic + Treasure of Arabic Morphology in regards to Sarf. The Madinah series looks unnecessarily long and boring, especially if you're staring at a screen for so long.
                I cannot support this decision; in fact, I couldn't disagree more with it.

                If you are studying on your own the idea of studying books like "Tasheel un Nahw" or "Hidaayatun Nahw" which are all about theory and give little to no opportunity for practice is a recipe for disaster, in my opinion. Yes, you'll think that things are going well for the first 40 pages or so and then things start getting fuzzy and then about 30 pages later you decide you've had too much of studying Arabic....believe me, been there, done that.

                If you would like another alternative both to your plan and what I've outlined above, then consider the series "Lisan ul Quran" (3 volumes) which is based on the every popular "An Nahw al Wadih" (which has copious EXAMPLES and loads and loads of exercises) and is available in English. It is available for download at www.archive.org and the following link: http://www.kalamullah.com/lisan-ul-quran.html

                Regardless, may Allah make it easy for you and I would advise you to post some of your questions here as well. I'm sure that everyone will benefit, both those who step up to the plate and answer your questions and those who read them.

                Wa'salaam.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: What books to self-study Classical/Quranic Arabic, from beginner to advanced?

                  Originally posted by Sunni_Student78 View Post
                  I cannot support this decision; in fact, I couldn't disagree more with it.

                  If you are studying on your own the idea of studying books like "Tasheel un Nahw" or "Hidaayatun Nahw" which are all about theory and give little to no opportunity for practice is a recipe for disaster, in my opinion. Yes, you'll think that things are going well for the first 40 pages or so and then things start getting fuzzy and then about 30 pages later you decide you've had too much of studying Arabic....believe me, been there, done that.

                  If you would like another alternative both to your plan and what I've outlined above, then consider the series "Lisan ul Quran" (3 volumes) which is based on the every popular "An Nahw al Wadih" (which has copious EXAMPLES and loads and loads of exercises) and is available in English. It is available for download at www.archive.org and the following link: http://www.kalamullah.com/lisan-ul-quran.html

                  Regardless, may Allah make it easy for you and I would advise you to post some of your questions here as well. I'm sure that everyone will benefit, both those who step up to the plate and answer your questions and those who read them.

                  Wa'salaam.
                  Lisan-ul Quran looks pretty good. How extensive is it exactly? After I complete all three books, will I have studied everything? Will I have covered all of Hidayat-un Nahw?

                  Tasheel al-Nahw is all theory and Madinah Arabic is all practice. I want something with both theory and practice.
                  What if we study Tasheel al-Nahw and take examples and exercises from Lisan-ul Quran.

                  If we do study Lisan-ul Quran, should I study Durus-ul Lughah (Madinah Arabic) in the side and Qasas-un Nabiyyeen? And how so?

                  I've tried A Simplified Arabic Grammar (Tawdeeh-un Nahw) but it's way too complicated as compared to Tasheel al-Nahw.
                  I wanted the grammar structure of Tasheel al-Nahw (ilm-un Nahw), but a lot more exercises and examples and a little more explanation.

                  What about Arabic Tutor (Arbi Ka Mu'allim)?

                  And also, what about Sarf, what do I study? Is Fundamentals of Classical Arabic followed by Treasures of Arabic Morphology okay? And how should I study them?

                  Jazakallah for all the help. It's much appreciated. Wasalam
                  Last edited by ZakirAhmed; 14-05-14, 01:06 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: What books to self-study Classical/Quranic Arabic, from beginner to advanced?

                    Originally posted by ZakirAhmed View Post
                    Lisan-ul Quran looks pretty good. How extensive is it exactly? After I complete all three books, will I have studied everything? Will I have covered all of Hidayat-un Nahw?
                    After both perusing it and knowing that it is basically "an Nahw al Wadih" with some additional improvements, I can confidently say that, yes, the book does cover EVERYTHING in Hidaayat un Nahw insofar as the rules of "Nahw" are concerned.

                    Originally posted by ZakirAhmed View Post
                    Lisan-ul QuranTasheel al-Nahw is all theory and Madinah Arabic is all practice. I want something with both theory and practice.
                    1) Actually, if you do the Madinah Arabic books (volumes 1 and 2 that is) with the aid of the videos at www.lqtoronto.com you will get a lot in the way of theory as the brother who teaches there provides this theory in a wonderful way. Furthermore, even the Madinah book keys have a fair amount of theory.

                    2) Lisan ul Quran and Arbi ka Mu'allim both provide theory along with examples. However, I can promise you that the way books like Lisan ul Quran, Arbi Ka Mu'allim, Tasheel un Nahw, etc. present theory, if you are studying almost completely on your own, you will soon be lost if you don't have some background in the basic structures of the language and some basic ability to apply the rules that you do know.. Sure, the first few chapters make sense then it gets slightly fuzzy, then incomprehensible, and then you want to just give up. Truthfully, I know whereof I speak. This is the reason why again and again I always recommend the first two Madinah books (along with the videos at www.lqtoronto.com).

                    Originally posted by ZakirAhmed View Post
                    What if we study Tasheel al-Nahw and take examples and exercises from Lisan-ul Quran.
                    I am not sure how, especially if you're just starting out, you would pick and choose exercises and examples to complement what you'd be learning in Tasheel al-Nahw. So, sorry, I can't help you out here.


                    Originally posted by ZakirAhmed View Post
                    If we do study Lisan-ul Quran, should I study Durus-ul Lughah (Madinah Arabic) in the side and Qasas-un Nabiyyeen? And how so?
                    No, if you do decide to make Lisan ul Quran your first exposure to the language, finish the three books completely and do not study anything else on the side. Of course, if some topic in Lisan ul Quran is treated in a confusing way you can see how it is treated or explained in "Tasheel un Nahw", "Arbi Ka Mu'allim", etc. but definitely finish the series first.

                    Originally posted by ZakirAhmed View Post
                    I've tried A Simplified Arabic Grammar (Tawdeeh-un Nahw) but it's way too complicated as compared to Tasheel al-Nahw.
                    I agree and was beyond disappointed with it (at least for someone just starting out in Arabic).

                    Originally posted by ZakirAhmed View Post
                    I wanted the grammar structure of Tasheel al-Nahw (ilm-un Nahw), but a lot more exercises and examples and a little more explanation. What about Arabic Tutor (Arbi Ka Mu'allim)?
                    Lisan ul Quran is probably about as close to what you are looking for as you could get but then Arabic Tutor (i.e. "Arbi ka Mu'allim") is also just as good but the arrangement departs a great deal from the traditional syllabus. But again, good luck trying to understand some of the explanations in either books.

                    Now if you are still DEAD-SET on doing something that is THEORY-HEAVY while still wanting to learn "on your own" (instead of signing up for something like the Shariah Program where you will get enough theory to last you several lifetimes), and would still like to rely on FREE materials, then perhaps you could do something like this:

                    1) "Ten Lessons of Arabic" (based on the Das Sabaq of Mawlana 'Abd al Salam Kidwai Nadvi) [79 pages]
                    2) "Arabic Grammar of the Holy Quran" by the "Al Qaem Institute" (yes, I know that they are Shi'ite but their deviance does not appear to have affected their treatment of Arabic Grammar in this rather small booklet) [45 pages]
                    3) "Towards instruction of the Arabic language to English speakers by adherence to the Ajrumiyyah" (37 pages)
                    4) Tasheel un Nahw
                    5) al-Hidayat fi an Nahw (which is the only Hidaayatun Nahw translation in English that I know and it is based on an Iranian version of the text that has exercises in the Arabic portion of the text, so that means that this contains both the Arabic of the original text and the translation)

                    But, I must tell you in good conscience that if you are studying without a teacher then this is a recipe for failure and frustration, plain and simple. It is truthfully my belief that most people who think that Arabic is hard are precisely those that have undertaken this "theory-heavy" path without studying under a teacher. The optimal way to learn under a teacher as opposed to independently are WORLDS apart, in my opinion.

                    Originally posted by ZakirAhmed View Post
                    And also, what about Sarf, what do I study? Is Fundamentals of Classical Arabic followed by Treasures of Arabic Morphology okay? And how should I study them?
                    Look at my initial response to your questions and I'm sure you'll find that I've covered this.

                    Finally, having said all that I have said, I want to again ask you to reconsider and just devote 10-12 weeks of your life to going through the first two volumes of the Madinah series. You will make your Arabic learning odyssey so much more easy and beneficial. I really don't know how in the world to drive home this point.

                    I advise everyone to do one of two things if they want to learn Arabic:

                    1) If you have about $2000 or so to throw around, sign up for the Shariah Program.
                    2) If you don't (and maybe even if you do), then cover Madinah Books 1 and 2 (NOT book 3) with the aid of the videos at www.lqtoronto.com and I promise you that you won't regret it (insha'allah).

                    Wa'salaam.
                    Last edited by Sunni_Student78; 15-05-14, 06:48 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: What books to self-study Classical/Quranic Arabic, from beginner to advanced?

                      ZakirAhmed if you are really motivated then do what I did.

                      Pick up Thackstons book on Arabic Grammar and read it and work through the examples.

                      Then pick up the most comprehensive grammar reference written in English which is W.Wrights Grammar and memorize it

                      Finally, get books with translations. Read the Arabic, apply the rules you memorized and then see if you get the meaning by comparing with the translation. (If you have trouble at this stage simply msg me and I will help you out for free)

                      Did this and can read pretty much any classical or modern Arabic I come across.

                      And everyone has different opinions, but I for one would never spend $2000 (which is about 2 lakh Pakistani rupees) to learn Arabic or any other language for that matter. That is just expensive as far as I am concerned. Actually, a complete rip off.
                      Watch those eyes

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: What books to self-study Classical/Quranic Arabic, from beginner to advanced?

                        Originally posted by Sunni_Student78 View Post
                        After both perusing it and knowing that it is basically "an Nahw al Wadih" with some additional improvements, I can confidently say that, yes, the book does cover EVERYTHING in Hidaayat un Nahw insofar as the rules of "Nahw" are concerned.

                        --

                        1) Actually, if you do the Madinah Arabic books (volumes 1 and 2 that is) with the aid of the videos at www.lqtoronto.com you will get a lot in the way of theory as the brother who teaches there provides this theory in a wonderful way. Furthermore, even the Madinah book keys have a fair amount of theory.

                        2) Lisan ul Quran and Arbi ka Mu'allim both provide theory along with examples. However, I can promise you that the way books like Lisan ul Quran, Arbi Ka Mu'allim, Tasheel un Nahw, etc. present theory, if you are studying almost completely on your own, you will soon be lost if you don't have some background in the basic structures of the language and some basic ability to apply the rules that you do know.. Sure, the first few chapters make sense then it gets slightly fuzzy, then incomprehensible, and then you want to just give up. Truthfully, I know whereof I speak. This is the reason why again and again I always recommend the first two Madinah books (along with the videos at www.lqtoronto.com).

                        --

                        I am not sure how, especially if you're just starting out, you would pick and choose exercises and examples to complement what you'd be learning in Tasheel al-Nahw. So, sorry, I can't help you out here.

                        --

                        No, if you do decide to make Lisan ul Quran your first exposure to the language, finish the three books completely and do not study anything else on the side. Of course, if some topic in Lisan ul Quran is treated in a confusing way you can see how it is treated or explained in "Tasheel un Nahw", "Arbi Ka Mu'allim", etc. but definitely finish the series first.

                        --

                        I agree and was beyond disappointed with it (at least for someone just starting out in Arabic).

                        --

                        Lisan ul Quran is probably about as close to what you are looking for as you could get but then Arabic Tutor (i.e. "Arbi ka Mu'allim") is also just as good but the arrangement departs a great deal from the traditional syllabus. But again, good luck trying to understand some of the explanations in either books.

                        Now if you are still DEAD-SET on doing something that is THEORY-HEAVY while still wanting to learn "on your own" (instead of signing up for something like the Shariah Program where you will get enough theory to last you several lifetimes), and would still like to rely on FREE materials, then perhaps you could do something like this:

                        1) "Ten Lessons of Arabic" (based on the Das Sabaq of Mawlana 'Abd al Salam Kidwai Nadvi) [79 pages]
                        2) "Arabic Grammar of the Holy Quran" by the "Al Qaem Institute" (yes, I know that they are Shi'ite but their deviance does not appear to have affected their treatment of Arabic Grammar in this rather small booklet) [45 pages]
                        3) "Towards instruction of the Arabic language to English speakers by adherence to the Ajrumiyyah" (37 pages)
                        4) Tasheel un Nahw
                        5) al-Hidayat fi an Nahw (which is the only Hidaayatun Nahw translation in English that I know and it is based on an Iranian version of the text that has exercises in the Arabic portion of the text, so that means that this contains both the Arabic of the original text and the translation)

                        But, I must tell you in good conscience that if you are studying without a teacher then this is a recipe for failure and frustration, plain and simple. It is truthfully my belief that most people who think that Arabic is hard are precisely those that have undertaken this "theory-heavy" path without studying under a teacher. The optimal way to learn under a teacher as opposed to independently are WORLDS apart, in my opinion.

                        --

                        Look at my initial response to your questions and I'm sure you'll find that I've covered this.

                        Finally, having said all that I have said, I want to again ask you to reconsider and just devote 10-12 weeks of your life to going through the first two volumes of the Madinah series. You will make your Arabic learning odyssey so much more easy and beneficial. I really don't know how in the world to drive home this point.

                        I advise everyone to do one of two things if they want to learn Arabic:

                        1) If you have about $2000 or so to throw around, sign up for the Shariah Program.
                        2) If you don't (and maybe even if you do), then cover Madinah Books 1 and 2 (NOT book 3) with the aid of the videos at www.lqtoronto.com and I promise you that you won't regret it (insha'allah).

                        Wa'salaam.
                        It brings a huge smile to my face seeing how extensively you answer the questions. May Allah reward you abundantly.

                        After your answer, I gather how much you emphasize the first and second Madinah books and I understand that Lisaan-ul-Quran will be my best choice.

                        Do you suggest I study the Madinah Books, 1 & 2, and thereafter study the 3 volumes of Lisaan-ul-Quran?

                        Also, is Lisaan-ul-Quran a strictly Nahw book or does it also teach a little bit of Sarf, or maybe all of it, although I doubt it? You say I should study no other books while studying these 3 volumes; then what about Sarf? Do I study Sarf after the 3 volumes of Lisaan-ul-Quran and which books?

                        What about Balaghah? Which books should I study and how should I study them if I decide on Lisaan-ul-Quran?

                        Are there any other books I should study after Lisaan-ul-Quran to extend my vocab or anything else? How much vocab will Lisaan-ul-Quran + Madinah Series build? Is it enough?

                        I had a look at the Shariah program as you suggested and it seems a little too expensive just for ready content and then 2 online classes a week. It seems as though the teacher's trying to make way too much money, considering how many people sign up for the course from around the globe. What's so different about the Shariah program anyway? How will I benefit from it as opposed to, say, a local teacher? Is there something so fundamentally special about it that I won't get by other means?

                        Jazakallah.

                        Originally posted by ZeeshanParvez View Post
                        ZakirAhmed if you are really motivated then do what I did.

                        Pick up Thackstons book on Arabic Grammar and read it and work through the examples.

                        Then pick up the most comprehensive grammar reference written in English which is W.Wrights Grammar and memorize it

                        Finally, get books with translations. Read the Arabic, apply the rules you memorized and then see if you get the meaning by comparing with the translation. (If you have trouble at this stage simply msg me and I will help you out for free)

                        Did this and can read pretty much any classical or modern Arabic I come across.

                        And everyone has different opinions, but I for one would never spend $2000 (which is about 2 lakh Pakistani rupees) to learn Arabic or any other language for that matter. That is just expensive as far as I am concerned. Actually, a complete rip off.
                        Jazakallah, but I'm not looking for college-like studying of the language. I want a more comprehensive traditional study. And I agree with you on your $2000 matter. I don't mind spending that much for a local class, but ready content and 2 online classes? That is a rip off; seems like the teacher could dumb down the price a lot lot more and make more than enough,
                        Last edited by ZakirAhmed; 17-05-14, 04:35 AM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: What books to self-study Classical/Quranic Arabic, from beginner to advanced?

                          Originally posted by ZakirAhmed View Post
                          It brings a huge smile to my face seeing how extensively you answer the questions. May Allah reward you abundantly.
                          I thank you and may Allah reward you for overlooking the terseness present in my responses.

                          Originally posted by ZakirAhmed View Post
                          After your answer, I gather how much you emphasize the first and second Madinah books and I understand that Lisaan-ul-Quran will be my best choice.
                          Yes and, probably, Yes.

                          Originally posted by ZakirAhmed View Post
                          Do you suggest I study the Madinah Books, 1 & 2, and thereafter study the 3 volumes of Lisaan-ul-Quran?
                          I would support this approach.

                          Originally posted by ZakirAhmed View Post
                          Also, is Lisaan-ul-Quran a strictly Nahw book or does it also teach a little bit of Sarf, or maybe all of it, although I doubt it? You say I should study no other books while studying these 3 volumes; then what about Sarf? Do I study Sarf after the 3 volumes of Lisaan-ul-Quran and which books?
                          No, Lisan ul Quran covers both Sarf and Nahw. As for your questions about Sarf and how to study it along with Lisaan ul Quran, I would say that probably the best thing you can do is to scroll up to my first post in this thread. Follow that progression just as I have outlined it, however, simply substitute Volumes 1 and 2 of Lisan ul Quran for "Arbi Ka Mu'allim" volumes 1-3 in Phase 4. Similarly, in Phase 5, substitute Lisan ul Quran volume 3 for Arbi Ka Mu'allim Volume 4. Keep the other parts of the progression the same. If you do so, I cannot envision that you would have any difficulties in Sarf. If, for whatever reason, you would, it probably just requiring looking at a reference text for a refresher on some point.

                          Originally posted by ZakirAhmed View Post
                          What about Balaghah? Which books should I study and how should I study them if I decide on Lisaan-ul-Quran?
                          Read the following thread ( Balaghah curriculum for the independent learner? ) at this link: http://www.lisanularab.org/forums/showthread.php?t=1696

                          It is my (VERY UNQUALIFIED) ramblings and musings on the subject. I hope that it (if you read all the posts on the thread) will give you some insights on how you might proceed.

                          Originally posted by ZakirAhmed View Post
                          Are there any other books I should study after Lisaan-ul-Quran to extend my vocab or anything else? How much vocab will Lisaan-ul-Quran + Madinah Series build? Is it enough?
                          If I am not mistaken, Lisan ul Quran contains approximately 2200 or so vocabulary words in the vocabulary lists, though it should be noted that there is much more vocabulary that is not in the lists, especially when you get to volume 3. Furthermore, I think that all the of the vocabulary in the first two volumes of the Madinah series are also found in Lisan ul Quran. As such, I can say that you'll learn 2200+ words (insha'allah).

                          As for your question of whether that would be "enough", and by that I presume you mean to be fluent in the language, then the answer is NO. You will have to amass quite a bit more vocabulary (probably in the neighborhood of 8000-12,000 words) but that can happen gradually and over time. There are a number of paths for doing this but I don't think that it would be appropriate for me to go into them now as I am of the opinion that once you finish Lisan ul Quran you yourself will probably be a very good position to assess how you best learn vocabulary, what kinds of books or resources keep you interested, what kind of vocabulary you want to learn, etc. However, if you want some of my thoughts on this, please ask later and I will do my best to oblige.

                          Originally posted by ZakirAhmed View Post
                          I had a look at the Shariah program as you suggested and it seems a little too expensive just for ready content and then 2 online classes a week. It seems as though the teacher's trying to make way too much money, considering how many people sign up for the course from around the globe. What's so different about the Shariah program anyway? How will I benefit from it as opposed to, say, a local teacher? Is there something so fundamentally special about it that I won't get by other means?

                          Originally posted by ZakirAhmed View Post
                          Jazakallah, but I'm not looking for college-like studying of the language. I want a more comprehensive traditional study. And I agree with you on your $2000 matter. I don't mind spending that much for a local class, but ready content and 2 online classes? That is a rip off; seems like the teacher could dumb down the price a lot lot more and make more than enough,
                          At the moment I do not have the time to go into a lot of depth but I intend on doing so in the future. However, peruse these three threads and I think that your question will be about 50% answer insha'allah:

                          Excellent 45 page report by Mufti Yusuf Mullan Sahib
                          http://www.sunniforum.com/forum/show...f-Mullan-Sahib

                          Shariah Program Negative and Cons
                          http://www.sunniforum.com/forum/show...ives-and-cons&

                          Arabic Learning Resources and Programs.
                          http://www.sunniforum.com/forum/show...ict#post604431

                          Insha'allah, in the very near future, I will try to answer your question more directly and do my best to shed some light some of the other questions you asked in your initial post that have been left unanswered on this thread.

                          Wa'salaam.
                          Last edited by Sunni_Student78; 18-05-14, 09:13 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: What books to self-study Classical/Quranic Arabic, from beginner to advanced?

                            Ones that are written goodly and has the appropriate concept regarding Deen this is how it can work at the same time the one that has a lot to do with our daily life,You should go for Arabic ones as they are the finest way and surely have a a good outcome.
                            When its about learning Arabic, [URL="http://arabicspeakingcourse.com/ways-learn-arabic-language"]Ways to Learn the Arabic Language [/URL]works for sure.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: What books to self-study Classical/Quranic Arabic, from beginner to advanced?

                              Originally posted by Sunni_Student78 View Post
                              I thank you and may Allah reward you for overlooking the terseness present in my responses.

                              --

                              Yes and, probably, Yes.

                              --

                              I would support this approach.

                              --

                              No, Lisan ul Quran covers both Sarf and Nahw. As for your questions about Sarf and how to study it along with Lisaan ul Quran, I would say that probably the best thing you can do is to scroll up to my first post in this thread. Follow that progression just as I have outlined it, however, simply substitute Volumes 1 and 2 of Lisan ul Quran for "Arbi Ka Mu'allim" volumes 1-3 in Phase 4. Similarly, in Phase 5, substitute Lisan ul Quran volume 3 for Arbi Ka Mu'allim Volume 4. Keep the other parts of the progression the same. If you do so, I cannot envision that you would have any difficulties in Sarf. If, for whatever reason, you would, it probably just requiring looking at a reference text for a refresher on some point.

                              --

                              Read the following thread ( Balaghah curriculum for the independent learner? ) at this link: http://www.lisanularab.org/forums/showthread.php?t=1696

                              It is my (VERY UNQUALIFIED) ramblings and musings on the subject. I hope that it (if you read all the posts on the thread) will give you some insights on how you might proceed.

                              --

                              If I am not mistaken, Lisan ul Quran contains approximately 2200 or so vocabulary words in the vocabulary lists, though it should be noted that there is much more vocabulary that is not in the lists, especially when you get to volume 3. Furthermore, I think that all the of the vocabulary in the first two volumes of the Madinah series are also found in Lisan ul Quran. As such, I can say that you'll learn 2200+ words (insha'allah).

                              As for your question of whether that would be "enough", and by that I presume you mean to be fluent in the language, then the answer is NO. You will have to amass quite a bit more vocabulary (probably in the neighborhood of 8000-12,000 words) but that can happen gradually and over time. There are a number of paths for doing this but I don't think that it would be appropriate for me to go into them now as I am of the opinion that once you finish Lisan ul Quran you yourself will probably be a very good position to assess how you best learn vocabulary, what kinds of books or resources keep you interested, what kind of vocabulary you want to learn, etc. However, if you want some of my thoughts on this, please ask later and I will do my best to oblige.

                              --


                              --

                              At the moment I do not have the time to go into a lot of depth but I intend on doing so in the future. However, peruse these three threads and I think that your question will be about 50% answer insha'allah:

                              Excellent 45 page report by Mufti Yusuf Mullan Sahib
                              http://www.sunniforum.com/forum/show...f-Mullan-Sahib

                              Shariah Program Negative and Cons
                              http://www.sunniforum.com/forum/show...ives-and-cons&

                              Arabic Learning Resources and Programs.
                              http://www.sunniforum.com/forum/show...ict#post604431

                              Insha'allah, in the very near future, I will try to answer your question more directly and do my best to shed some light some of the other questions you asked in your initial post that have been left unanswered on this thread.

                              Wa'salaam.
                              Thanks again for your answer. You answered all my questions and have in fact opened my mind in terms of how I should proceed - through this thread, through other posts from you in various other forums and through further research on my part.

                              In the following post, I have detailed the curriculum I will use to study on one's own, so you can see it and comment if there may be any downsides and so future viewers of this thread may benefit.
                              I don't have much time now, so I will start now just by naming the books, but I will slowly add to it: descriptions, links to PDFs, hard copies and related content, reason for this book and vice versa to each.
                              Please comment on the books and the curriculum to your knowledge and I will research and adjust accordingly. It may not be a great list at this moment but I will continue researching and editing. I kindly request that you visit the post from time to time (since you've been of much help) and then comment on the updates if possible.

                              Just one more thing:
                              Do pages 1 through 90 of Treasures of Arabic Morphology review Fundamentals of Classical Arabic?
                              Does Lisaan-ul-Quran cover all the other content from Treasures of Arabic Morphology?
                              I have included Ilm-us Seeghah in the Syllabus (which is more advanced Sarf than Treasures of Arabic Morphology). How much Sarf does Lisaan-ul-Quraan actually cover? Does Lisaan-ul-Quran already cover everything in Ilm-us-Seeghah?

                              Thanks again Sunni_Student, you have helped me and my friends a great deal and I pray that Allah reward you. Jazakallah.

                              Comment

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