Ads by Muslim Ad Network

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Arabic and Hebrew

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Arabic and Hebrew

    Asslamu Alaykum

    What similarities do Arabic and Hebrew have?

  • #2
    Re: Arabic and Hebrew

    they r both semitic language,both having triliteral root system, alot of the same sounds are in the alphabet, some words r similar sounding...
    dno what else cos i do not kno ne hebrew, i think dhakiyya learned a bit she might be able to tell u
    .: Rufaida :.
    .:Fa Firroo Ila-llaah:.
    http://s61.photobucket.com/albums/h6...th_Silence.jpg
    “People praise you for what they suppose is in you,
    but you must blame your soul for what you know is in you.”
    ~ Ibn Atallah

    Ramadan Activities for Children
    <button id="tw_schedule_btn" class="tw-schedule-btn" style="padding: 4px 6px;position: absolute;left: 141px;top: 840px;background-color: #F7F7F7; background: linear-gradient(#FFF, #F0F0F0); border: 1px solid #CCC; color: #5F5F5F; cursor: pointer; font-weight: bold; text-shadow: 0 1px #FFF; white-space: nowrap;border-radius: 3px;font-size: 11px; display: none; z-index: 8675309">Schedule</button>

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Arabic and Hebrew

      I never learned the hebrew language, just the alphabet (kind of) prior to being Muslim. Hebrew has 22 letters, each of the 22 is directly equivalent to 22 of the Arabic alphabet, and it's in the abjad order (the same as the old Arabic alphabet order) each hebrew letter has a numerical value which used to be shared with 22 of the Arabic letters but that has fallen into disuse among Arabs, although I think the hebrew letter number values are still used sometimes. Also the letters share something of their shape with the Arabic equivalents. Arabic is considered by some to be like a cursive version of Hebrew, with some additional letters as well.

      the abjad order is like: .....alif (aleph in hebrew), ba (beth), jeem (gemel), dal (daleth), ........ minds gone blank lol can't remember any more...... in Arabic there's ha as in hadha, Ha as in Hamas and Kha as in Khaled, in Hebrew there's just the first two but the second one is usually pronounced more like khaled than Hamas. But the letter's actually equivalent to the Hamas Ha, not the Arabic Kha' if I remember rightly. There's no hebrew equivalent of Kha' for Khaled, and the way it's written in Arabic is a Ha' with a dot.

      As Anna said, the structure of the language, 3 letter root system, is the same as in Arabic, also, the same root meanings exist in both languages in many cases. I can't think of any examples though as I don't know much vocabulary in Hebrew. One I do know is that the Hebrew word "Qabalah" meaning a Jewish mystical tradition, shares the same root as the Arabic word "Qiblah" and afaik is spelled with the same equivalent letters (not sure if the vowel marks are the same though).

      Also remember that modern Hebrew is a ressurrected language, it was dead for a couple of thousand years and only used in scriptures and religious rituals etc and learned by Rabbis (kind of how Latin was used in the catholic church), the Jewish people in Europe spoke Yiddish, which is closely related to German and English, although it contains words "borrowed" from Hebrew - kind of like how Urdu is like Hindi but contains a lot of borrowed Arabic words. So modern Hebrew has less in common with Arabic than ancient Hebrew, and the pronunciation of modern Hebrew is relatively Germanified/Yiddishified due to it being ressurected by a population who prior to the event mainly spoke German and/or Yiddish.
      [CENTER]
      [/CENTER]
      [CENTER]
      [/CENTER]

      [SIZE=1][COLOR=dimgray]
      [/COLOR][/SIZE]

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Arabic and Hebrew

        this page has the abjad order of Arabic and the numerical values of each letter - the hebrew alphabet has the first 22, up to the numerical value 400. there's a little bit about it at the bottom of the page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abjad_numerals

        The Arabic letters that are not in Hebrew are: tha' as in theletha, kha' as in khaled, dhal as in dhakiyya, Daad as in Daaleen, Dhal as in Abu Dhabi, and ghain as in Al-Ghazzali

        (sorry I can't write the actual Arabic letters on this keyboard - my signature was a cut and paste, before anyone asks about that!!)
        Last edited by dhak1yya; 21-08-10, 04:48 PM.
        [CENTER]
        [/CENTER]
        [CENTER]
        [/CENTER]

        [SIZE=1][COLOR=dimgray]
        [/COLOR][/SIZE]

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Arabic and Hebrew

          Actually I do know about three Hebrew words....... shalom is salaam, shabat is sabbath and mashom is checkpoint.

          guess where I learned that lol
          [CENTER]
          [/CENTER]
          [CENTER]
          [/CENTER]

          [SIZE=1][COLOR=dimgray]
          [/COLOR][/SIZE]

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Arabic and Hebrew

            It is not a pretty language, it sounds so rough.
            Their always 'kh this and kh that' They seem to use their throat more than their tongue :S
            Freedom exists only in the hereafter

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Arabic and Hebrew

              Jzk. Just doing some important work, I'm going to read the replies thorougly after Iftar. @Dhakiyya, I want to learn it as it will help me with a job I want in the future. Israel is almost a superpower now which means Hebrew could become a world wide language, and in most places hebrew is used as a second or third language.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Arabic and Hebrew

                uzi and bazooka are hebrew words too, I believe.

                Where do they speak Hebrew as a 2nd language? Outside of Israel it's not spoken anywhere as a first language, and most Israelis speak other languages, including English and Russian. I don't believe that Hebrew will be an international language anytime soon. It would be useful to learn if you are going to live in Israel or Palestine (a lot of Palestinians speak Hebrew)

                If you are going to learn Hebrew, do something useful with it, like translate the Qur'an into Hebrew. There's no Hebrew translation of the Qur'an that was translated by Muslims. And I don't trust any Qur'an translation that was translated by a non Muslim, simply because if they understood the Qur'an they'd be Muslim.
                [CENTER]
                [/CENTER]
                [CENTER]
                [/CENTER]

                [SIZE=1][COLOR=dimgray]
                [/COLOR][/SIZE]

                Comment

                Working...
                X