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Fusha(MSA) vs Lahja(colloquial) Arabic

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  • Fusha(MSA) vs Lahja(colloquial) Arabic

    What is best way to learn the Arabic Language so you will be understood by Arabs?

    MSA or Classical or Quranic or Colloquial.......

    I'm trying to learn MSA at the moment, but I know that each Arab country speaks in Colloquial dialects. I beleive that if I learn MSA first then it will be easier to pick up a dialect later?:hidban::hidban:
    rajul aswad min amrika

  • #2
    Re: Fusha(MSA) vs Lahja(colloquial) Arabic

    Literary Arabic
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Jump to: navigation, search
    This article contains Arabic text, written from right to left in a cursive style with some letters joined. Without proper rendering support, you may see unjoined Arabic letters written left-to-right, instead of right-to-left or other symbols instead of Arabic script.
    Literary Arabic
    اللغة العربية الفصحى
    Spoken in: Arab world

    Total speakers: ca. 300 million; up to 1 billion (mainly Muslims around the globe) with a significant or working knowledge of the language.
    Language family: Afro-Asiatic
    Semitic
    West Semitic
    Central Semitic
    South Central Semitic
    Arabic
    Literary Arabic
    Writing system: Arabic alphabet
    Official status
    Official language in: Arab world, Israel, Djibouti, Eritrea, Chad, Somalia, Comoros

    Literary Arabic (اللغة العربية الفصحى al-luġatu l-ʿarabiyyatu l-fuṣḥā "the classical Arabic language") or Standard Arabic is the literary and standard variety of Arabic used in writing. It is part of the Arabic macrolanguage.

    Most western scholars distinguish two common (al-)fuṣ-ḥā (الفصحى) varieties: the Classical Arabic (CA) of the Qur'an and early Islamic (7th to 9th centuries) literature, and Modern Standard Arabic (MSA), the standard language in use today. The modern Standard language is based on the Classical language. Most Arabs consider the two varieties to be two registers of one language.

    Classical Arabic, also known as Qur'anic Arabic, is the language used in the Qur'an as well as in numerous literary texts from Umayyad and Abbasid times (7th to 9th centuries).

    Classical Arabic is often believed to be the parent language of all the spoken varieties of Arabic, but recent scholarship, such as Clive Holes' (2004), questions this view, showing that other Old North Arabian dialects were extant in the 7th century and may be the origin of current spoken varieties.
    rajul aswad min amrika

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    • #3
      Re: Fusha(MSA) vs Lahja(colloquial) Arabic

      Colloquial Arabic
      The Hidden Language





      Colloquial Arabic (in Arabic called 'Lahja A'mmeya' is the spoken language throughout all Arabic countries. It is the local variations of the classical Arabic, these variations are called dialects.





      Here are some of the most common Arabic dialects:



      Egyptian Arabic dialect:

      This is the most common dialect, it is spoken language by 80 million people. It is the most understood of all Arabic dialects, due to several factors, such as the central position of Egypt, it's population, it's historic importance, the spread of Egyptian arts and culture ( Egyptian films, Egyptian songs, Egyptian TV channels...etc.)

      Egyptian Arabic dialect is enormously rich and is continuously increasing to such a extent that there are always new, 'playing on words'.I am not exaggerating.



      Egyptian Arabic dialect has several variations or sub-dialects within it, such as the the dialects of Cairo, Alexandria, Nubia, Sinai...etc



      Shami Arabic dialect:


      Also called Levantine Arabic (Syria is also called Al-Sham; Shami means 'of Syria' or 'from Syria).

      This is the spoken language or spoken dialect in Syria, Lebanon, Jordan and Palestine (total population of 35 million). There are some variations of the colloquial Arabic from one country to the other.

      Gulf Arabic dialects (or Arabic peninsula):

      The spoken colloquial language of around 35 million people. Within the Arabic peninsula dialects we can identify the following major sub-dialects:



      Saudi dialect (with more minor sub-dialects).
      Omani dialect.
      Kuwaiti dialect.
      Gulf States dialects, also called Arabic Emirates dialects.
      Yemeni dialects (with several sub-dialects).


      Iraqi Arabic dialects:

      Spoken by 30 million people. It has the following major sub dialects:

      Baghdad dialect.
      Basra dialect.
      Mousel dialect.


      North African Arabic dialect:

      Also called Maghrib dialects. Spoken by 50 million people in Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Libya. Each country of them has it's dialect, but they are close to each other. Again, each one of them has it's sub-dialects.






      This is the language or the Average/Common man

      As I mentioned above, these are the major and most common dialects, but not all.



      If you just want to speak Arabic, you can learn one dialect of colloquial Arabic and use this dialect to speak with other Arabs from different Arabic countries, they will all understand you!



      You will be able to watch Arabic films, listen to Arabic songs and even follow an Arabic TV channel.

      With some practice of course.



      Just use your common sense when you want to choose a dialect to learn
      rajul aswad min amrika

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      • #4
        Re: Fusha(MSA) vs Lahja(colloquial) Arabic

        i think its best to learn MSA first as u said because then u will be able to pick up different dialects i think as u have the basis of the language in place.
        but tbh there are alot of people that when u speak to them in fusha they dont really get it, and u need to speak in their local dialect for them to understand you properly. although it depends where u go, in egypt we found that was the case with a lot of people. if you go on umrah, you can speak fusha to the people there in makkah and madinah and doesnt seem to be a problem.
        but learn atleast some of fusha first, before u go into dialects, i think that wil b better for u insha allah
        <button id="tw_schedule_btn" class="tw-schedule-btn" style="padding: 4px 6px;position: absolute;left: 141px;top: 840px;background-color: #F7F7F7; background: linear-gradient(#FFF, #F0F0F0); border: 1px solid #CCC; color: #5F5F5F; cursor: pointer; font-weight: bold; text-shadow: 0 1px #FFF; white-space: nowrap;border-radius: 3px;font-size: 11px; display: none; z-index: 8675309">Schedule</button>

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        • #5
          Re: Fusha(MSA) vs Lahja(colloquial) Arabic

          Originally posted by .: Anna :. View Post
          i think its best to learn MSA first as u said because then u will be able to pick up different dialects i think as u have the basis of the language in place.
          but tbh there are alot of people that when u speak to them in fusha they dont really get it, and u need to speak in their local dialect for them to understand you properly. although it depends where u go, in egypt we found that was the case with a lot of people. if you go on umrah, you can speak fusha to the people there in makkah and madinah and doesnt seem to be a problem.
          but learn atleast some of fusha first, before u go into dialects, i think that wil b better for u insha allah
          Thanks for your insight....because I really want to hear from people who are learning Arabic (I don't think you can master Arabic).

          I plan on learning MSA because its the language understood by most Arabs, especially reading and writing.
          The only problem with MSA is that underedcated Arabs may not understand it when you travel in the Arab World.

          But thanks for your insight...
          rajul aswad min amrika

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Fusha(MSA) vs Lahja(colloquial) Arabic

            I have actually spoken fusha everywhere in the Middle East.

            Even with foreign taxi drivers, they say you speak different, or where are you from.

            You will probably be understood in all 4 types of dialect now even by the undereducated.

            MSA - probably the most.
            Fusha - the next.
            slang - the next.
            then English.

            The problem with slang Lahja, a Syrian may understand an Egyptian in his dialect but (s)he will find it strange and difficult understand you if you come with a dialect. As language is perfected through speech. And you never loose the ascent that you were raised with hence when an American/Uk speaks Arabic, you hear the origins of his ascent hence it sounds slight different than the norm.

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