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Becoming Fluent in Arabic without Travelling Overseas?

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  • Linkdeutscher
    replied
    Originally posted by AmantuBillahi View Post

    I know that it's not impossible to pick up a language without travelling to that specific country. My issue is that I have never heard of a success story outside of brother AbuNajm who might literally be an anomaly. Does anyone know of somebody who took one of these online courses and is now accessing the scholarly sources? I mean, does it even work like that?

    I've always put this issue to the side as something not worthwhile unless you actually travel abroad and enroll in an Arabic institute.
    ZeeshanParvez is also self taught.
    abufulaans is also self taught.


    Just two examples from this forum that came to my mind right now.

    Leave a comment:


  • Linkdeutscher
    replied
    Originally posted by AmantuBillahi View Post
    Assalamu alaykum,

    I was meaning to create this thread earlier but recent discussions have inspired me to post this now.

    1. Is it possible to become fluent in Arabic without travelling overseas?
    2. Do you know anyone who has achieved this in the West?
    3. Are these institutions available online or only in person?
    4. Where would you recommend?

    By fluent I mean reaching the level of being able to open a scholarly book and understand what the author is conveying without constantly resorting to translations for every other word.

    You can master Arabic purely by self study, just like any other language. There's nothing mythical about it; it's just a language at the end of the day.

    You just need to be dedicated, have the right mindset and the right method. It is very possible to spend a lot of time and get little in return because of poor learning methods employed. However that is part of the trial and error associated with learning any skill.

    And just to make it clear, I didn't take into account being able to fluently converse in Arabic; that's a totally different beast.

    Leave a comment:


  • notEVOLVED
    replied
    Originally posted by AmantuBillahi View Post

    How far have you gotten in terms of language-acquiring materials and courses if you don't mind me asking? Did you even take a course or enroll in a program in your pursuit of studying Arabic? Sorry to put you on the spot, but maybe answering in this manner will help remove some of my assumptions.

    I basically want to know how fluent does the average person become when dedicating themselves to studying Arabic in the West. There are lecture series and Arabic courses offered online by a number of institutions - are these materials even worth your while or do they only help lay the foundations for when you actually travel abroad to study the language? Do you know of anyone who studied Arabic in the West and is now fluently engaging with the wide-range of Islamic literature? Or are these programs and lecture series essentially focused on granting students a richer experience with the Quran?

    JazakAllahu Khayran.
    I have grown up 'studying' Arabic, if you could say that, because I lived in the Middle East and Arabic was compulsory in school. But I went to an international school and the teachers they had for Arabic were not good in English. They couldn't explain the concepts and hence my Arabic did not develop beyond the basic level in 14 years. Then in my university, I had to pass a certain level of Arabic too, because that was a requirement for the students, even if you are going to do your studies in English. I had to spend a semester in a Level 2 Arabic course, because I didn't pass the test. This course actually helped me in my grammar more than the 14 years of Arabic in school. The lecturer knew English. But my vocabulary still remains underdeveloped beyond the common Qur'anic ones. I have attempted several times to learn Arabic myself using books or lectures, but I just can't keep myself consistent. Right now, I am just trying to expand my vocabulary using Anki, and not giving that importance to grammar.

    I know some of the sons from the West self-studied Arabic and are pretty good without having to go to any institute or enroll in a program. And some others went abroad to study Arabic.

    I think Linkdeutscher r would agree that you don't need to enroll in a program or go abroad to learn Arabic fluently.

    Wa iyyak.

    Leave a comment:


  • AmantuBillahi
    replied
    Originally posted by Layla_ View Post
    Wa alaykum salaam

    Yes it’s possible. I know someone whose mother tongue is not Arabic & he has become very fluent to the point that he can pick up advanced classical books & read them without the need of a dictionary. He only listens to ulema from the Arab world & has done translation and so on.

    He didn’t attend an institute as such but relied very heavily on self study. Normally, one would go through the madina books to get a basic grasp of grammar, then do some sarf & then perhaps go through the Arabic poem al ajrumiyyah.

    When I was studying Classical Arabic, my study programme was as follows:

    1) madeena books & Arabic tutor
    2) sarf book
    3) going through a basic fiqh book
    4) translating stories of the prophets

    This was year 1 and I picked up A LOT. If I carried on with the programme i probably would have had an advanced knowledge in Arabic language
    Thank you. So this is a possible (i.e. realistic) route in reaching the stage where you could access the classical scholarly sources. That's pretty amazing. Not sure if I could ever do it without travelling abroad, but it's good to know that it's a viable option in general.

    Leave a comment:


  • Layla_
    replied
    The person I know who has self studied Arabic can pick up very advanced Arabic texts and read them btw. He studied with shuyookh who teach in Arabic this is the level he is on. But as I said earlier, he mainly did self study, finding a method to suit him & communicates regularly with Arabs to help him. For me immersion would work better as I lack the determination but it definitely can be done. I used to find Abu Taubahs Arabic classes on YouTube really good as a beginners level especially his lessons on al ajrumiyyah. There is plenty of resources available on YouTube that can help. I know it’s not exactly what you’re asking but could help others but I found translating qasus un nabiyeen word for word really really helped me and I preferred the gateway to Arabic series over madeena books

    Leave a comment:


  • Layla_
    replied
    Wa alaykum salaam

    Yes it’s possible. I know someone whose mother tongue is not Arabic & he has become very fluent to the point that he can pick up advanced classical books & read them without the need of a dictionary. He only listens to ulema from the Arab world & has done translation and so on.

    He didn’t attend an institute as such but relied very heavily on self study. Normally, one would go through the madina books to get a basic grasp of grammar, then do some sarf & then perhaps go through the Arabic poem al ajrumiyyah.

    When I was studying Classical Arabic, my study programme was as follows:

    1) madeena books & Arabic tutor
    2) sarf book
    3) going through a basic fiqh book
    4) translating stories of the prophets

    This was year 1 and I picked up A LOT. If I carried on with the programme i probably would have had an advanced knowledge in Arabic language

    Bare in mind though that to understand the classical texts one would be learning fusha/MSA and may be able to pick up a book and understand it, but could end up in a position where they go to Arabia and cannot speak the language!

    I find it helps to focus on Arabic speaking ulema to help pick up the language quicker. Uthmaan al Kamees is a good place to start. I also find that picking up a beginners fiqh book once you have some knowledge of Arabic helps immensely especially the books where you have the English on the side to refer to as the language is very basic. Bidayatul abid (Hanbali) book is great for beginners

    i can’t really answer question 3/4 as I personally find that a structured self study plan works better but you need to be very very determined & focussed. What I’ve found with a lot of the Arabic courses is that I would be wasting a year or so as I know most of what they study at the start but I would be too far behind to jump in straight at year 2 if that makes sense

    Leave a comment:


  • AmantuBillahi
    replied
    Originally posted by AmantuBillahi View Post
    Your people's silence might - and I said might - just encourage me to email one of those websites and ask them these questions myself, although I would hate to do that and much rather prefer receiving testimonials from experienced and trustworthy sources.

    Don't let me down Ummah forum.

    Leave a comment:


  • AmantuBillahi
    replied
    Originally posted by notEVOLVED View Post

    I barely understand Arabic outside the Qur'an.
    How far have you gotten in terms of language-acquiring materials and courses if you don't mind me asking? Did you even take a course or enroll in a program in your pursuit of studying Arabic? Sorry to put you on the spot, but maybe answering in this manner will help remove some of my assumptions.

    I basically want to know how fluent does the average person become when dedicating themselves to studying Arabic in the West. There are lecture series and Arabic courses offered online by a number of institutions - are these materials even worth your while or do they only help lay the foundations for when you actually travel abroad to study the language? Do you know of anyone who studied Arabic in the West and is now fluently engaging with the wide-range of Islamic literature? Or are these programs and lecture series essentially focused on granting students a richer experience with the Quran?

    JazakAllahu Khayran.

    Leave a comment:


  • notEVOLVED
    replied
    I barely understand Arabic outside the Qur'an.

    Leave a comment:


  • AmantuBillahi
    replied
    Umm Uthmaan

    Leave a comment:


  • AmantuBillahi
    replied
    Originally posted by AmantuBillahi View Post
    ..Are there others like you or were you an anomaly?..
    I know that it's not impossible to pick up a language without travelling to that specific country. My issue is that I have never heard of a success story outside of brother AbuNajm who might literally be an anomaly. Does anyone know of somebody who took one of these online courses and is now accessing the scholarly sources? I mean, does it even work like that?

    I've always put this issue to the side as something not worthwhile unless you actually travel abroad and enroll in an Arabic institute.

    Leave a comment:


  • AmantuBillahi
    replied
    AbuNajm

    Assalamu alaykum,

    You might be the only person that I know of - online or offline - who became fluent in Arabic without travelling abroad. Although I believe that your method was unconventional if I'm not mistaken? Are there others like you or were you an anomaly? What would you advise or do you think that it's generally more practical to travel overseas?

    Leave a comment:


  • AmantuBillahi
    replied
    Originally posted by AmantuBillahi View Post
    Assalamu alaykum,

    I was meaning to create this thread earlier but recent discussions have inspired me to post this now.

    1. Is it possible to become fluent in Arabic without travelling overseas?
    2. Do you know anyone who has achieved this in the West?
    3. Are these institutions available online or only in person?
    4. Where would you recommend?

    By fluent I mean reaching the level of being able to open a scholarly book and understand what the author is conveying without constantly resorting to translations for every other word.

    Maybe a better description would be to allow you to access the scholarly sources without relying on translations. Basically being fluent in the language similiar to how we are in English. If someone wants you to explain what an Arabic text is conveying then you should be able to do that right on the spot.

    Leave a comment:


  • AmantuBillahi
    replied
    Abu julaybeeb Muhammad Hasan notEVOLVED BintFulaan Layla_ SeekingtheCreator

    Leave a comment:


  • Becoming Fluent in Arabic without Travelling Overseas?

    Assalamu alaykum,

    I was meaning to create this thread earlier but recent discussions have inspired me to post this now.

    1. Is it possible to become fluent in Arabic without travelling overseas?
    2. Do you know anyone who has achieved this in the West?
    3. Are these institutions available online or only in person?
    4. Where would you recommend?

    By fluent I mean reaching the level of being able to open a scholarly book and understand what the author is conveying without constantly resorting to translations for every other word.


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