Ads by Muslim Ad Network

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Becoming Fluent in Arabic without Travelling Overseas?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Abu julaybeeb
    replied
    Originally posted by Linkdeutscher View Post
    No son. I finished it ages ago.

    It's still the most superior book for beginners I've come across including the awfully overrated Madina books.
    Medina is overated
    its just been publicised because its what medina uni uses

    but its not all that

    Leave a comment:


  • Linkdeutscher
    replied
    Originally posted by Abu julaybeeb View Post

    Your still using the bible book lol
    No son. I finished it ages ago.

    It's still the most superior book for beginners I've come across including the awfully overrated Madina books.

    Leave a comment:


  • Abu julaybeeb
    replied
    Originally posted by Linkdeutscher View Post

    https://archive.org/details/arabicsi...ge/n8/mode/2up

    This is the book. It's written by a Christian missionary, just as a heads up. You can skip some of the Bible passages if it bothers you (they're not really necessary).

    The lessons; I need to compile them since they're scattered.
    Your still using the bible book lol

    Leave a comment:


  • Linkdeutscher
    replied
    Originally posted by AmantuBillahi View Post

    Khayr inshaAllah. Send them either here or in a PM.
    https://archive.org/details/arabicsi...ge/n8/mode/2up

    This is the book. It's written by a Christian missionary, just as a heads up. You can skip some of the Bible passages if it bothers you (they're not really necessary).

    The lessons; I need to compile them since they're scattered.

    Leave a comment:


  • Abu julaybeeb
    replied
    Learning grammar before speaking and vocab doesnt make sense follow children they are the best example learn vocab and practise speaking first

    to be fluent in a language you need 10k words then you wont need to often look in a dictionary but still with quran and hadith you will have to look in a dictionary ad they contain ghareeb kalimaat ( strange words) that have shari3 and linguistic meanings that need explaining

    once vocab and speaking is well grammar can be focused on though you can do some basic grammar whilst still learning vocab

    but you have to practise speaking as that is neglected by many and is twice as hard when not living in a non arab speaking country

    i use anki to learn, revise and memorise words and gain the vocab from tatoeba arabic to english sentences which contains thousands of sentences with thousands of vocab though im in an arab country


    i stopped bayna yadaik and medina book

    but once vocab is strong i will just use medina books, then keys 2 knowledge nahu sarf then in sha Allah alfiya ibn malik

    most people just go through ajrumiya with a sharh such as sharh tuhfatu saniyaa or sharh mumti then qatr anada then alfiya ibn malik

    for sarf they go through basic sarf books then laamia aa3faal

    Leave a comment:


  • Layla_
    replied
    Originally posted by AmantuBillahi View Post

    Don't you think it's more practical for someone with no experience to first enroll in a program and get their feet wet? Maybe I'm imagining it in the wrong way. Not like I could attend a program if the hours were 9-12 like you said.
    It depends on the individual and their learning style. There’s a lot of basic Arabic grammar books out there to help a beginner self study. Before I attended my course, I was sporadically studying Arabic so I had a good foundation when I started. Not all courses are full time like mine, some would be once a week and for me that’s too less. With Arabic you need to do a bit every day (in my opinion) to get to a good level. Ustadh Tim Humble also disagrees with the approach of many institutes, saying that the focus is too heavily on grammar too quickly and that students drop out of courses very quickly. He thinks it’s better to learn by getting children’s books (where the grammar will very gradually be introduced) so that the learner is able to understand children’s books quickly and thus it will motivate them to continue as they can see they are making progress. He also emphasises on learning vocabulary and so on, which institutes won’t really do..

    Leave a comment:


  • AmantuBillahi
    replied
    Originally posted by Layla_ View Post

    i was working and doing the course in the morning so literally had no time and it was very intense. I think it was like 9am - 12:30 every day, which doesn’t seem to bad but is hard when you’re working full time. I then had my daughter so I could not continue. But I did start the course again just before corona but the teacher (May Allah reward her) kept going on tangents,I don’t want to be offensive so I won’t say about what (wasn’t about Arabic!) and I just found that the majority of the time she was telling us all these ‘stories’ rather than teach and I’m very impatient. Her learning style was very different and I couldn’t learn off her, she was teaching in a way which made Arabic very difficult

    I find when it comes to courses, the teacher makes a MASSIVE difference. The first time I did the course, the teacher was amazing and as I said, I picked up a lot. But she stuck to the schedule.

    For me, self study is better than attending an institute. I’ll post pics if you’re interested in some of my studies from when I was very newly enrolled in the first course to show you what you can achieve if you put your mind to it

    Don't you think it's more practical for someone with no experience to first enroll in a program and get their feet wet? Maybe I'm imagining it in the wrong way. Not like I could attend a program if the hours were 9-12 like you said.

    Leave a comment:


  • Layla_
    replied
    Originally posted by AmantuBillahi View Post
    Layla_

    Could I ask why you stopped after year 1? Was it too time consuming or something like that? How does the scheduling even work?
    i was working and doing the course in the morning so literally had no time and it was very intense. I think it was like 9am - 12:30 every day, which doesn’t seem to bad but is hard when you’re working full time. I then had my daughter so I could not continue. But I did start the course again just before corona but the teacher (May Allah reward her) kept going on tangents,I don’t want to be offensive so I won’t say about what (wasn’t about Arabic!) and I just found that the majority of the time she was telling us all these ‘stories’ rather than teach and I’m very impatient. Her learning style was very different and I couldn’t learn off her, she was teaching in a way which made Arabic very difficult

    I find when it comes to courses, the teacher makes a MASSIVE difference. The first time I did the course, the teacher was amazing and as I said, I picked up a lot. But she stuck to the schedule.

    For me, self study is better than attending an institute. I’ll post pics if you’re interested in some of my studies from when I was very newly enrolled in the first course to show you what you can achieve if you put your mind to it


    Leave a comment:


  • YahyaIbnSelam
    replied
    Originally posted by AmantuBillahi View Post
    Assalamu alaykum,

    1. Is it possible to become fluent in Arabic without travelling overseas?

    By fluent I mean reaching the level of being able to open a scholarly book and understand what the author is conveying without constantly resorting to translations for every other word.
    It is certainly possible. And not that hard. It just needs practice. Resorting to translations is not a bad thing, it is part of the learning process. After 2-3 you will rely less on it. But even advanced students, even scholars still rely on dictionaries occasionally. Dictionaries are in Arabic as well as other languages a permanent tool of philological studies.

    I would recommend following a course and practising with translations. I used to translate lectures and nasheeds, and publish them online, which is more motivating than translating for one's self. There are many courses around online, though I am not experienced with English ones.

    Leave a comment:


  • AmantuBillahi
    replied
    Originally posted by Linkdeutscher View Post

    A little but consistent effort goes a long way. Learning a language is more about investing time rather than being a 'difficult' or hard task. It just demands time. And that time can be easily stretched over any period of time, as long as consistency is present.

    That book is out of print and it's kind of ancient. I meant the PDF.

    I actually started writing a few simplified lessons based off that book myself intending to create my own version of it (but haven't completed it yet). I could also send you those to help you get into the book.
    Khayr inshaAllah. Send them either here or in a PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Linkdeutscher
    replied
    Originally posted by AmantuBillahi View Post

    Yeah it's for me, but there's no gurantee that I'm going to go through with it. I still need more motivation inshaAllah, lol. Learning a new language sounds like an extremely daunting task. Although I could speak two languages myself, I learned my parents language before English and I hated learning French at school. I guess I'm not that good at language acquisition, but in all honestly I haven't really tried.

    What do you mean by send it to me? Is it online or an actual book? I'll pay for the expenses if you think that it's worth it.
    A little but consistent effort goes a long way. Learning a language is more about investing time rather than being a 'difficult' or hard task. It just demands time. And that time can be easily stretched over any period of time, as long as consistency is present.

    That book is out of print and it's kind of ancient. I meant the PDF.

    I actually started writing a few simplified lessons based off that book myself intending to create my own version of it (but haven't completed it yet). I could also send you those to help you get into the book.

    Leave a comment:


  • AmantuBillahi
    replied
    Originally posted by Linkdeutscher View Post
    Self study with books.

    My personal opinion is that most programs are overrated and way too slow. Also some of them are blatant rip offs, like the Andalus Institute. Well, based on what I saw with in my time interacting with it (a fellow son decided to pay 500 dollars for it).

    Is this for you? I have scoured through many different books for learning Arabic from scratch and I feel I have found arguably the best one. I could send it to you.
    Yeah it's for me, but there's no gurantee that I'm going to go through with it. I still need more motivation inshaAllah, lol. Learning a new language sounds like an extremely daunting task. Although I could speak two languages myself, I learned my parents language before English and I hated learning French at school. I guess I'm not that good at language acquisition, but in all honestly I haven't really tried.

    What do you mean by send it to me? Is it online or an actual book? I'll pay for the expenses if you think that it's worth it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Linkdeutscher
    replied
    Originally posted by AmantuBillahi View Post

    Nice. Do you recommend any specific methods or institutions yourself? What has the highest rate of success in your opinion? The goal is to be able to access the scholarly literature and not just have a richer relationship with the Quran. I mention that because I know there are programs like Bayyinah, which if I'm not mistaken are geared towards better comprehending the Quran.
    Self study with books.

    My personal opinion is that most programs are overrated and way too slow. Also some of them are blatant rip offs, like the Andalus Institute. Well, based on what I saw with in my time interacting with it (a fellow son decided to pay 500 dollars for it).

    Is this for you? I have scoured through many different books for learning Arabic from scratch and I feel I have found arguably the best one. I could send it to you.

    Leave a comment:


  • AmantuBillahi
    replied
    Layla_

    Could I ask why you stopped after year 1? Was it too time consuming or something like that? How does the scheduling even work?

    Leave a comment:


  • AmantuBillahi
    replied
    Originally posted by Linkdeutscher View Post

    You can master Arabic purely by self study, just like any other language. There's nothing mythical about it; it's just a language at the end of the day.

    You just need to be dedicated, have the right mindset and the right method. It is very possible to spend a lot of time and get little in return because of poor learning methods employed. However that is part of the trial and error associated with learning any skill.

    And just to make it clear, I didn't take into account being able to fluently converse in Arabic; that's a totally different beast.
    Nice. Do you recommend any specific methods or institutions yourself? What has the highest rate of success in your opinion? The goal is to be able to access the scholarly literature and not just have a richer relationship with the Quran. I mention that because I know there are programs like Bayyinah, which if I'm not mistaken are geared towards better comprehending the Quran.

    Leave a comment:

Collapse

Edit this module to specify a template to display.

Working...
X