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Fiqh of Ruqyah: "It is better not seek Ruqyah"

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  • Fiqh of Ruqyah: "It is better not seek Ruqyah"

    As-Salaamu Alaykum,

    Ibn Haajib al-Maliki and Shihab ad-Deen an-Nafrawi both mention in their books of Fiqh that there are two levels to Muslims- those who seek Ruqyah and cures for their sicknesses and those who do not. They both say that the higher level is the group who does not seek Ruqyah or cures.

    Shihab ad-Deen says:

    "Abandonment of seeking of Ruqyah is recommended with respect to the one who has the strength to exercise patience upon the harm of sickness as it is reported to have been said to [Abu Bakr] as-Siddeeq: "We will call a doctor for you." So, he said: "Doctors make me sick". And what is recommended with respect to the weak is to do so [i.e. seek Ruqyah]."

    See al-Fawakih ud-Dawani, 2/338

    Ibn Haajib relates the following about Umar bin Abd al-Azeez:

    "It was said to him, "Shall we not bring you a doctor?" He said: "By Allah, if I knew that my cure lay in raising my hands to my ear lobes, I would not raise them." It was also related that he said: "I committed a grave sin, so I cried over it for 40 years." It was said to him: "What was the sin?" He replied: "I became sick, so I made Ruqyah and [the sickness] broke." Thus, he treated the Ruqyah as a sin from which he sought forgiveness."

    Ibn Haajib explains that this approach towards Ruqyah is the high degree of a Muslim, whereas the second state is when a person is unable to bear a sickness with patience.

    See al-Madkhal, 4/116


  • #2
    Sahih al-Bukhari

    Book of Medicine

    (42) Chapter: Whoever does not treat or get treated with a Ruqya

    Narrated Ibn `Abbas:

    The Prophet (ﷺ) once came out to us and said, "Some nations were displayed before me. A prophet would pass in front of me with one man, and another with two men, and another with a group of people. and another with nobody with him. Then I saw a great crowd covering the horizon and I wished that they were my followers, but it was said to me, 'This is Moses and his followers.' Then it was said to me, 'Look'' I looked and saw a big gathering with a large number of people covering the horizon. It was said, "Look this way and that way.' So I saw a big crowd covering the horizon. Then it was said to me, "These are your followers, and among them there are 70,000 who will enter Paradise without (being asked about their) accounts. "

    Then the people dispersed and the Prophet (ﷺ) did not tell who those 70,000 were. So the companions of the Prophet (ﷺ) started talking about that and some of them said, "As regards us, we were born in the era of heathenism, but then we believed in Allah and His Apostle . We think however, that these (70,000) are our offspring."

    That talk reached the Prophet (ﷺ) who said, "These (70,000) are the people who do not draw an evil omen from (birds) and do not get treated by branding themselves and do not treat with Ruqya, but put their trust (only) in their Lord." then 'Ukasha bin Muhsin got up and said, "O Allah's Messenger (ﷺ)! Am I one of those (70,000)?" The Prophet (ﷺ) said, "Yes." Then another person got up and said, "Am I one of them?" The Prophet (ﷺ) said, " 'Ukasha has anticipated you."


    https://sunnah.com/bukhari/76/67

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Abu 'Abdullaah View Post
      Sahih al-Bukhari

      Book of Medicine

      (42) Chapter: Whoever does not treat or get treated with a Ruqya

      Narrated Ibn `Abbas:

      https://sunnah.com/bukhari/76/67
      Jazak Allahu khayran.

      That is the Hadith that most scholars cite as evidence for the view that it is superior to forgo Ruqyah treatment in favor of Tawakkul in Allah. The Athaar in the OP are ancillary proofs that support the meaning of the Hadith above and demonstrate its practice among the Salaf. There were others as well.

      Comment


      • #4
        Sahih al-Bukhari

        Book of Patients

        (6) Chapter: The superiority of a person suffering from epilepsy

        Narrated 'Ata bin Abi Rabah:

        Ibn `Abbas said to me, "Shall I show you a woman of the people of Paradise?" I said, "Yes." He said, "This black lady came to the Prophet (ﷺ) and said, 'I get attacks of epilepsy and my body becomes uncovered; please invoke Allah for me.' The Prophet (ﷺ) said (to her), 'If you wish, be patient and you will have (enter) Paradise; and if you wish, I will invoke Allah to cure you.' She said, 'I will remain patient,' and added, 'but I become uncovered, so please invoke Allah for me that I may not become uncovered.' So he invoked Allah for her."


        https://sunnah.com/bukhari/75/12

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Abu 'Abdullaah View Post
          Sahih al-Bukhari

          Book of Patients

          (6) Chapter: The superiority of a person suffering from epilepsy

          Narrated 'Ata bin Abi Rabah:

          Ibn `Abbas said to me, "Shall I show you a woman of the people of Paradise?" I said, "Yes." He said, "This black lady came to the Prophet (ﷺ) and said, 'I get attacks of epilepsy and my body becomes uncovered; please invoke Allah for me.' The Prophet (ﷺ) said (to her), 'If you wish, be patient and you will have (enter) Paradise; and if you wish, I will invoke Allah to cure you.' She said, 'I will remain patient,' and added, 'but I become uncovered, so please invoke Allah for me that I may not become uncovered.' So he invoked Allah for her."


          https://sunnah.com/bukhari/75/12

          Is the epilepsy in this particular hadith understood to be caused by jinn? If not, how do we reconcile this with seeking treatment generally?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Poster View Post


            Is the epilepsy in this particular hadith understood to be caused by jinn? If not, how do we reconcile this with seeking treatment generally?
            Why can't it be applied generally?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Abu 'Abdullaah View Post

              Why can't it be applied generally?
              Assuming the treatment for an illness is available, is it not recommended to take it? Does it differ on the type of illness?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Poster View Post

                Assuming the treatment for an illness is available, is it not recommended to take it? Does it differ on the type of illness?
                Most of us would assume that we should take it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Poster View Post
                  Is the epilepsy in this particular hadith understood to be caused by jinn? If not, how do we reconcile this with seeking treatment generally?
                  This is yet another instance, among many, wherein the translation of a Hadith, or the chapter heading it comes under in the compilation, is incorrect or misleading.

                  In Arabic, the chapter heading is: "Fadl man yusra`u min ar-Reehi". What this means: "The Advantage of One Who Has Epileptic Fits From the Wind".

                  The explanation of this Hadith, as found in Fat'h al-Bari, one of the most authoritative and comprehensive explanations of the narrations in Saheeh al-Bukhari, is the following that I've translated for readers here:

                  "The retention of wind can be a cause for Sar`, and it is an illness that prevents the principal limbs from their normal response, though not completely. Its causes are a strong wind obstructed in the openings of the brain or “bad vapor” rising to [the brain] from some of the limbs. Subsequent to [the cause] are convulsions in the limbs. The effected individual does not remain standing, rather he falls and emits froth due to the thickness of the saliva. There is also Sar` from the Jinn and it does not happen except from impure spirits among them, whether due to admiration of some of the human appearances or in order to inflict harm through [the fits]. The first cause [rough wind] is that which all doctors confirm and they mention its treatment. As for the second cause [Jinn-related], a majority [of doctors] deny it and some of them confirm it and they do not know of any treatment for it except by means of the struggle of superior, virtuous souls to repel the effects of evil, base souls and to render their actions useless. From what Hippocrates wrote from [doctors] about that is what he said when mentioning the cure for the epileptic: “This will only benefit that which its cause is a “humor”. As for that which its cause is from spirits, then, no…”

                  In summary, there are two causes for epileptic fits- wind and Jinn. The Hadith in question is regarding epilepsy caused by wind not Jinn. Al-Bukhari indicated his understanding of this fact when assigning chapter titles to his compilation. And, as Ibn Hajar points out in his Sharh of the Hadith, epilepsy caused by wind has a treatment whereas there is a difference of opinion [among doctors] regarding whether it can even be caused by Jinn.

                  An important point to note here is that it is likely that the term "doctors" in the above explanation refers to medical doctors and not scholars of Islamic medicine. Also, the term "treatment" above also likely refers to some "medical" treatment and not Ruqyah. I base that likelihood on the example of "one of them" given by Ibn Hajar as the Greek philosopher/physician Hippocrates.

                  As for Islamic medicine and scholars of it, Ibn Qayyim is reported to have said the following about epilepsy and its treatment:

                  "The treatment of this type [of illness, i.e. epilepsy] is by means of two matters: the affair with respect to the epileptic and the affair with regard to the one treating him. As for that which is with respect to the epileptic, then it is by means of his own strength and conviction of turning towards the Creator and Maker of these spirits and seeking sound refuge by means of the heart and tongue. As for the second, with respect to the one treating him, he must have the strength of certainty and conviction of seeking refuge in Allah, exalted is He, to the point that among those who treat others are those for whom it is sufficient for them to say: “"Leave him”," "“In the Name of Allah”," or “"There is no power nor might except by means of Allah”." The Prophet, peace and blessings of Allah be upon him, used to say: "“Leave, enemy of Allah. I am the Messenger of Allah."

                  I translated this passage from a different, contemporary explanation of Saheeh al-Bukhari called Manaar al-Qari by Hamza Muhammad Qasim, volume 5, page 200.

                  Full disclosure- Badr ad-Deen al-Ayni mentions in his Umdat al-Qari, another explanation of Saheeh al-Bukhari, that the Mu'tazilah denied the entry of Jinn into the body of epileptics. Badr ad-Deen al-Ayni refuted this view of theirs.

                  Sorry, there is more to say on this Hadith and the points raised in the Shuruuh, however I do not have time now. Perhaps later, In Sha' Allah.
                  Last edited by AbuNajm; 21-10-18, 09:00 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Poster View Post

                    Assuming the treatment for an illness is available, is it not recommended to take it? Does it differ on the type of illness?
                    The matter of recommendation is a Fiqhi issue, as mentioned elsewhere in another thread- the recommendation of scholars is not to seek treatment for those able to be patient and that is based on the Prophet, peace be upon him, telling the epileptic woman, the blind man, and others, that it is better for them to be patient with their issues. However, permission has been given to seek treatment for those unable to bear their burdens with patience.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Abu 'Abdullaah View Post

                      Why can't it be applied generally?
                      Generally ? as in a person is suffering for example from an acute apendicitis and he should be patient with it?
                      Or generally for occult ailments?
                      And the thunder exalts [ Allah ] with praise of Him - and the angels [as well] from fear of Him - and He sends thunderbolts and strikes therewith whom He wills while they dispute about Allah ; and He is severe in assault

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by AbuNajm View Post
                        ... .
                        Jazak'Allah khair

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Poster View Post

                          Jazak'Allah khair
                          Maybe it's just me, but I see a link between this and people who always ask others to make dua for them.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Abu 'Abdullaah View Post

                            Maybe it's just me, but I see a link between this and people who always ask others to make dua for them.
                            Right. It is permissible to seek ruqyah but it's preferred not to, and likewise with asking for dua from others.

                            Wallahu a'lam

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Poster View Post

                              Right. It is permissible to seek ruqyah but it's preferred not to, and likewise with asking for dua from others.

                              Wallahu a'lam
                              Salaam aghi


                              How about asking dua from your father as we know that a dua from a parent for his child is more likely to be accepted?

                              Sunan Abu Dawood Book 8 Hadith 1531.

                              حَدَّثَنَا مُسْلِمُ بْنُ إِبْرَاهِيمَ، حَدَّثَنَا هِشَامٌ الدَّسْتَوَائِيُّ، عَنْ يَحْيَى، عَنْ أَبِي جَعْفَرٍ، عَنْ أَبِي هُرَيْرَةَ، أَنَّ النَّبِيَّ صلى الله عليه وسلم قَالَ ‏
                              "‏ ثَلاَثُ دَعَوَاتٍ مُسْتَجَابَاتٌ لاَ شَكَّ فِيهِنَّ دَعْوَةُ الْوَالِدِ وَدَعْوَةُ الْمُسَافِرِ وَدَعْوَةُ الْمَظْلُومِ ‏"‏ ‏.‏


                              Narrated AbuHurayrah:

                              The Prophet (Peace be upon him) said: Three supplications are answered, there being no doubt about them; that of a father, that of a traveller and that of one who has been wronged.

                              https://muflihun.com/abudawood/8/1531
                              And the thunder exalts [ Allah ] with praise of Him - and the angels [as well] from fear of Him - and He sends thunderbolts and strikes therewith whom He wills while they dispute about Allah ; and He is severe in assault

                              Comment

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