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Reuters: Pakistan police hunting for gang rape culprits

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  • Reuters: Pakistan police hunting for gang rape culprits

    (I am pissed off beyond belief at this story.)

    Pakistani police hunt for gang rape culprits
    Wed Aug 24, 9:56 AM ET

    KARACHI (Reuters) - Pakistani police are hunting a dozen men in connection with the gang rape of a woman, including two set free this week by a lower court in the southern city of Karachi, police said on Wednesday.
    The case has parallels with that of Mukhtaran Mai, a village woman who became an international symbol for women's rights after speaking out against her gang rape ordeal three years ago.

    Mariam Bano, 35, says she was raped by five men last month near her house in a poor area of Karachi.

    Coming from a traditional community originally from rural Sindh province, Bano's family sought justice from the clan's eight-member jirga (council), which pardoned the rapists after money was paid to some of the victim's relatives.

    Bano and her husband, however, refused to be bought off and went to the mainstream judicial system seeking justice against the rapists and the jirga members.

    But on Monday a judicial magistrate set free two of the jirga members, while remanding one of the accused rapists.

    A distraught Bano had to be restrained from jumping from a second-floor window in the court house, and in the ensuing uproar the case was brought to the attention of a more senior judge, who ordered a fresh inquiry.

    "We want justice. No compensation is enough for us, and we only want that the rapists and jirga members should be punished," Bano's husband Abdul Rasheed Chandio said.

    Shahid Qureshi, an investigating officer, said a hunt was now on for 12 men, including the two freed earlier, and police had to submit a report within three days.

    Gang rapes and honor killings often occur in feudal, rural Pakistan, but are less common in urban areas.

    In Mai's case a village council ordered that she be gang-raped as a punishment after her brother, who was just 12 at the time, was judged to have offended tribal honor by befriending a 30-year-old woman from a more powerful clan.

    In June, Pakistan's Supreme Court ordered the re-arrest of 13 men accused of involvement in the crime, pending the outcome of Mai's appeal against a high court decision to overturn the convictions and free the men.
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  • #2
    This woman was covered, wearing a niqab, a practising muslimah. How many more injustices? How many more lives have to be ruined? The culprits always get let off the hook, a backhander of a few thousand rupees secures their release - and ensures that justice is not done.

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    • #3
      Wow, its good to see a lot of muslim sympathisers on here.

      Ive heard of this case, Mukhtar mai, a girl who got raped at the hands of a teacher offering 'tuition' and there are COUNTLESS more.

      http://www.womensenews.org/article.cfm/dyn/aid/1835/ -- Those who cry rape face jail.
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      • #4
        LAHORE, Pakistan (WOMENSENEWS) - Growing up was never going to be easy for Sharee Komal.

        Born into an impoverished family living in a hut made of odd pieces of stained cloth tied to pieces of wood next to a decrepit cemetery in a poor Lahore neighbourhood, her life's prescription was to be hard work, few amenities, and little-to-no gratitude in Pakistan's male-dominated society.

        As desperate as her situation was, life took a horrifying turn for the cherub-faced 7-year-old the morning of May 29 when a neighbor did the unthinkable.

        "He promised me toys and some chocolate," Sharee whispers of the man she accuses, 23-year-old Ali Bahader. "But when I saw he was taking me to a dark little house, I began screaming and he started hitting me in the face . . . then he really started hurting me."

        Almost eight hours later, Sharee's distraught mother and police officers found her lying unconscious in the cemetery bruised and bleeding from the assault. The police officers--in a rare show of understanding in Pakistan--stopped Sharee's mother, Parveen Barkat, from bathing the little girl and rushed her to a Lahore hospital where tests confirmed their fears.

        Sharee had been raped.

        Underreported Crime Afflicts Many Children

        For Pakistani human rights campaigners Sharee's case came as little surprise in a country where rape reporting is weak and sexual assaults on children are a major part of the problem.

        Eight rapes are reported every day in Pakistan, a country of 147 million. Human rights activists estimate that for every rape case reported, there are two more that are never brought to the authorities' attention.

        The arguments against reporting a rape in Pakistan--where family matters are largely kept behind closed doors and rape is an instant assault on the honor of a family--are powerful. Rape victims who register cases are often ostracized by friends and neighbors while the general public, even in cases publicized by the local media, remains largely apathetic.

        Perpetrators and their families often browbeat rape victims for a "compromise" or "forgiveness," threatening further violence should the case be pursued. Law enforcement officials remain largely unsympathetic to the crime of rape often refusing to file charges.

        If the victim decides to press ahead, the experience can be discouraging. Recently, for instance, the father of an 8-year-old boy reportedly raped by a local maulvi (religious preacher) in Lahore's suburbs withdrew the official complaint after neighbors and acquaintances spent weeks publicly condemning him for attempting to sully the reputation of a holy man.

        Of the eight official rape cases reported each day, five are minors. Young boys and pubescent males also fall victim to sexual abuse by elders, at least two every day. Of the reported rapes--of both girls and boys--two-thirds are gang rapes.

        Yet each year there are only a handful of convictions against rapists.

        Going Public

        In a rare show of defiance in a society that often discourages victims from speaking out against rape, Sharee's mother, Barkat, decided to go public with the case. With the help of local nongovernmental organizations, she called a press conference in early June to ask Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf to personally ensure Bahader is punished for his actions.

        Bahader says he did not commit the crime. Bahader is currently in police custody awaiting trial or bail; Barkat feels nothing less than life in prison would be suitable punishment.

        "People in the neighborhood have called me a liar, spit at me, and thrown things," says Barkat. "We're terrified that there is nothing to keep someone from attacking all of us, but we're talking about the life of my child and I want justice."

        For aid organizations working on the rape issue, determined parents like Barkat are few and far between. And even in the most determined cases, they say that settling out of court almost always prevails over Pakistan's achingly slow judicial system.

        Cases often drag on for years during which time societal pressure mounts on the victim's family to cease airing their dirty laundry in public.

        Risk of Facing Hudood Ordinance

        Should the victim be unable to produce four male witnesses to testify on their behalf, she is likely to end up being charged under Pakistan's notorious Hudood Ordinance, which criminalizes extra- or pre-marital sex, and carries a punishment of death. According to the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan, 50 percent of the women who report rapes end up being charged under the controversial law.

        "If you take 75 cases, four will end up in court, and maybe one will end up with a conviction," says Fatima Ambreen, coordinator of War Against Rape--or WAR--a Pakistani aid organization that works specifically on the rape issue and is aiding Barkat with Sharee's case. The group is providing free legal advice and counseling for Sharee and her family.

        Set up in the early 1990s by a group of 15 concerned citizens, WAR now has offices in most major Pakistani cities and has dozens of qualified professionals--doctors, nurses, lawyers, and journalists--lending their skills to combat the prevalence of rape through seminars and public awareness campaigns. The group also pushes for more government acknowledgement of the problem and better support to victims.

        Besides providing rape victims with physical and mental treatment and assisting with legal representation, WAR runs workshops and public awareness campaigns across the country.

        "People just have a tendency to close their eyes to something that desperately needs to be talked about," Ambreen says. "We have to break the taboo, end the silence."

        Juliette Terzieff is a freelance journalist currently based in Pakistan who has worked for the San Francisco Chronicle, Newsweek, CNN International, and the London Sunday Times.
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        • #5
          first of all this is a sick thing anyone who has raped should be killed in full public view with no pity and no leniancy that is the way of Islam ... i dont trust the news stories you have published so i have no comment on them... the link you gave full of hatred for islam nothing else... the hudud in islam is simple and the punishment for rape is simple just the sick society that the british left and that the pakistani munafiq government continues to follow has caused rapists and mudererers and raafidah and the rest to walk around freely..


          There is no nobility in anyone who lacks faith.

          The wise man knows that the only fitting price for his soul is a place in Paradise.

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          • #6
            Islam offers justice for any victim.

            >>i dont trust the news stories you have published so i have no comment on them<<

            Have you not heard of mukhtar mai? This recent story i posted above, is verified, it looked absolutely legitimate to me, no woman would cry her eyes out, and go out in public with her husband beside her saying shes been raped - in a backward thinking society which sees the victim as impure and tainted.

            People don't cry out 'rape' for fun! Numerous cases have been documented with the Pak army involved in them too. Its absolutely sickening and disgusting that these men are set free.
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            • #7
              it is absolutely sickening and disgusting that rapists get free their punishment is nothing but death nothing else suffices... the story has been verified by whom? the laafir journalist who published it ? of the the news channel that showed it? that is not justification enough... rape can be proved i have asked the ulema what they say about this and they say things such as dna test can be used as evidence but because these munafiq regimes and their munafiq rulers do not want to rule by islam they refuse to adopt the islamic punishment and the islamic rulings then blame islam saying we need four witnesses etc.


              There is no nobility in anyone who lacks faith.

              The wise man knows that the only fitting price for his soul is a place in Paradise.

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              • #8
                Irhab, you have no right to question the credibility of this woman's case without knowledge of the case in its entirety. The nonmuslim media haven't reported this, its all over the news in the pakistan.. it's not some conspiracy bush and blair have devised.

                As for DNA - i agree, it should be used.
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                • #9
                  pakistani media kafir media whats the difference they are both the same? i dont question her credibility i am saying i dont know how can i accuse the man whoever he is of rape without even knowing anything about what is going on i am not going to believe what the media say about anyone or anything they have lies about everything made up false accusations why sould i believe a word they say... Islam says verify bad news so until I have i keep silent and say the same thing May Allah (swt) punish all rapists and the all deserve death muslim or non muslim and May Allah (swt) give us islamic law soon.


                  There is no nobility in anyone who lacks faith.

                  The wise man knows that the only fitting price for his soul is a place in Paradise.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Al_irhaab

                    .. the link you gave full of hatred for islam nothing else... the hudud in islam is simple and the punishment for rape is simple just the sick society that the British left

                    The British left 60yrs ago, and how reporting rape can be translated into being anti Islam is beyond understanding
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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by peapod
                      The British left 60yrs ago, and how reporting rape can be translated into being anti Islam is beyond understanding
                      EXACTLY!!!

                      This is just classic denial by some muslims so they don't have to face the problem. I'm sorry but to say that its not legit because it was reported by reuters or pakistani papers is sheer childishness.
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