Ads by Muslim Ad Network

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Niqaab....?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Khan8
    replied
    Re: Niqaab....?

    Niqab is wajib

    Leave a comment:


  • IbnTaymiyyah
    replied
    Re: Niqaab....?

    Originally posted by BintelIisam View Post
    As-sallamu alikum

    Would men on this forum want their wives to wear niqaab? What do people think?
    And what you sisters think, if your husbands/finaces tell you that they want you to wear niqaab?
    Tbh I would like here to wear niqaab and for me she looks more pretty with it, if she doesn't want, I don't mind at all, it's her choice anyways!

    Leave a comment:


  • IbnulQayyim
    replied
    Re: Niqaab....?

    Originally posted by PurpleMuslimah View Post
    However, his reasoning is that it's haram for men to ogle women (which is true), so it's fard upon women to do whatever is necessary to stop a man from ogling her, to the point that his sin becomes hers if she doesn't. That logic just doesn't work. It's like saying that because I don't have a burglar alarm, I'm to blame for the sin of someone who breaks in and steals from me, because I could have prevented it.
    Allaahu ta'aalaa a'lam. Allah knows best about that matter.

    Consult other 'Ulamaa about this.

    Leave a comment:


  • PurpleMuslimah
    replied
    Re: Niqaab....?

    Originally posted by IbnulQayyim View Post
    1. You should consult other 'Ulamaa if you're not sure of this scholar's answer. The Scholars on SunniForum are good, alhamdulillaah.

    2. The latter part of your statement here, well lets leave the explanation of Hadeeth to those who are qualified. There is Ikhtilaaf whether Niqaab is Fard or not.
    I understood what he said perfectly well, unless there's an issue with the translation. He stated that niqab is fard because it may cause fitnah for men to look at women.

    I can respect the view of someone who thinks it's fard based on a different interpretation of the exact meaning of a word in a verse, or a hadith - there may be legitimate grounds for disagreement there.

    However, his reasoning is that it's haram for men to ogle women (which is true), so it's fard upon women to do whatever is necessary to stop a man from ogling her, to the point that his sin becomes hers if she doesn't. That logic just doesn't work. It's like saying that because I don't have a burglar alarm, I'm to blame for the sin of someone who breaks in and steals from me, because I could have prevented it.

    Leave a comment:


  • IbnulQayyim
    replied
    Re: Niqaab....?

    Originally posted by PurpleMuslimah View Post
    1. The scholar himself said that it's allowed in certain conditions, but since women can't read minds, the onus is on them to never allow a man to do something that may or may not be haram for him. Considering that "being looked at with desire" when one has done nothing to cause it isn't haram in the first place, that's some pretty twisted logic.

    2. Plenty of people whose qualifications exceed yours or mine believe it isn't, hence the debate in this thread. There are simply too many ahadith mentioning a woman being beautiful, or being recognized by her face, or otherwise implying that her face was uncovered, without any mention of the Prophet (saws) correcting her. They can't all be explained away, no matter how much some like to try.

    What I wrote about the culture in KSA is in keeping with the mentality of the section of the fatwa I quoted - i.e., if an action causes men fitnah, it's haram because it causes fitnah - regardless of what it is, and regardless of the fact that they shouldn't have been looking in the first place. That's what the fatwa says. By that logic, men there are perfectly correct to blame women for causing them fitnah by not covering their eyes, or venturing out unaccompanied, or driving a car.

    Fotunately, haram and halal are not determined by what's convenient for those so lacking in iman that a glimpse of a woman's face throws them into a moral crisis.
    1. You should consult other 'Ulamaa if you're not sure of this scholar's answer. The Scholars on SunniForum are good, alhamdulillaah.

    2. The latter part of your statement here, well lets leave the explanation of Hadeeth to those who are qualified. There is Ikhtilaaf whether Niqaab is Fard or not.

    Leave a comment:


  • PurpleMuslimah
    replied
    Re: Niqaab....?

    Originally posted by IbnulQayyim View Post


    1. It's only allowed in certain conditions and vice versa [If I am not wrong].

    2. It's vice versa and it is supported by evidence. If people don't have the qualifications to understand the Qur'aan, Sunnah, Ijmaa' and Qiyaas then not Islam's problem.

    If culture does not follow Islam then too bad the sinful is the one who does not follow Islam.
    1. The scholar himself said that it's allowed in certain conditions, but since women can't read minds, the onus is on them to never allow a man to do something that may or may not be haram for him. Considering that "being looked at with desire" when one has done nothing to cause it isn't haram in the first place, that's some pretty twisted logic.

    2. Plenty of people whose qualifications exceed yours or mine believe it isn't, hence the debate in this thread. There are simply too many ahadith mentioning a woman being beautiful, or being recognized by her face, or otherwise implying that her face was uncovered, without any mention of the Prophet (saws) correcting her. They can't all be explained away, no matter how much some like to try.

    What I wrote about the culture in KSA is in keeping with the mentality of the section of the fatwa I quoted - i.e., if an action causes men fitnah, it's haram because it causes fitnah - regardless of what it is, and regardless of the fact that they shouldn't have been looking in the first place. That's what the fatwa says. By that logic, men there are perfectly correct to blame women for causing them fitnah by not covering their eyes, or venturing out unaccompanied, or driving a car.

    Fotunately, haram and halal are not determined by what's convenient for those so lacking in iman that a glimpse of a woman's face throws them into a moral crisis.

    Leave a comment:


  • IbnulQayyim
    replied
    Re: Niqaab....?

    Originally posted by PurpleMuslimah View Post
    See, this is the sort of reasoning that spoils the whole argument. There are two problems with this logic:

    1. The idea that it's sometimes permissible for a man to see a woman's face, but never permissible for a woman to show her face to a man, makes no sense.

    2. The idea that it's fard for a woman to cover or refrain from doing anything that might, conceivably, cause someone, somewhere to feel attraction towards her (when he shouldn't have been looking in the first place) is a slippery slope, and not supported by evidence.

    In areas of KSA where all women cover their faces, women are seen as 'fair game' if they don't cover their eyes. If she covers her entire face, but leave the house unaccompanied, she's still a 'fitnah'. This has no basis in Islam, but it's what happens when men are taught that it's the responsibility of women to keep them from ever feeling desire, rather than their own responsibility to lower their gaze and control themselves.

    The rule, depending on one's view, is either 'cover everything but the face and hands and behave in a proper manner' or 'cover everything and behave in a proper manner'. The rule is not 'if a man is attracted to you, you've automatically done something wrong'. That requires women to be mind readers.
    1. It's only allowed in certain conditions and vice versa [If I am not wrong].

    2. It's vice versa and it is supported by evidence. If people don't have the qualifications to understand the Qur'aan, Sunnah, Ijmaa' and Qiyaas then not Islam's problem.

    If culture does not follow Islam then too bad the sinful is the one who does not follow Islam.
    Last edited by IbnulQayyim; 28-03-11, 01:18 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • PurpleMuslimah
    replied
    Re: Niqaab....?

    See, this is the sort of reasoning that spoils the whole argument. There are two problems with this logic:

    1. The idea that it's sometimes permissible for a man to see a woman's face, but never permissible for a woman to show her face to a man, makes no sense.

    2. The idea that it's fard for a woman to cover or refrain from doing anything that might, conceivably, cause someone, somewhere to feel attraction towards her (when he shouldn't have been looking in the first place) is a slippery slope, and not supported by evidence.

    In areas of KSA where all women cover their faces, women are seen as 'fair game' if they don't cover their eyes. If she covers her entire face, but leave the house unaccompanied, she's still a 'fitnah'. This has no basis in Islam, but it's what happens when men are taught that it's the responsibility of women to keep them from ever feeling desire, rather than their own responsibility to lower their gaze and control themselves.

    The rule, depending on one's view, is either 'cover everything but the face and hands and behave in a proper manner' or 'cover everything and behave in a proper manner'. The rule is not 'if a man is attracted to you, you've automatically done something wrong'. That requires women to be mind readers.

    Leave a comment:


  • KeeKee
    replied
    Re: Niqaab....?

    get your facts straight my friend. hijab is fardh. i suggest you learn from ulema inshallah before forming opinions, there are amny verses in the quran regarding rules for women that address the ummahatul momineen but is also for all women, and this is no different. the verse in surah al ahzab and others are clear for those who want to see.

    Originally posted by anistop View Post
    Hijab is wajib but niqab is optional. I agree that it is preferrred, but it is not wajib. The verse of niqab was only for the wives of the Prophet (peace be upon him) I quoted the hadith in which the Prophet (peace be upon him) advised the girl to cover her body except hands and face. In another hadith, a companion was looking at women, and the Prophet (peace be upon him) held his face and moved him, as a kind reminder for him not to gaze at them. If the women were all covered in niqab, what was there to gaze at them. If women have to wear niqab, what is th epoint in the verse in Quran that asks men to lower their gaze. What is left to gaze at? In another hadith, women who prayed fajr in the mosque during the time sof the Prophet (peace be upon him) could not be recognized as it was still dark. If women were wearning niqab, they could not be recognized even during day time.

    Leave a comment:


  • IbnulQayyim
    replied
    Re: Niqaab....?

    The Niqab and its obligation in the Hanafi madhhab
    April 28, 2009 An original Deoband.org article

    By Mufti Husain Kadodia

    بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

    In the name of Allah, the Most Gracious, Most Merciful.

    Our discussion will entail the following:

    1. Introduction

    2. The juristic definition of shahwah (desire)

    3. The Hanafi stance

    3.1 Types of gazes and their respective rulings

    3.1.1 A gaze accompanied with conviction of no possibility of attraction
    3.1.2 A gaze accompanied with doubt of attraction
    3.1.3 A gaze accompanied with strong possibility or certainty of attraction

    3.2 The obligation of covering the face

    4. Conclusion

    ___________

    1. Introduction

    It is with great sadness that we note confusion in the minds of many students and even some scholars concerning the obligation of the niqab (veil) in the Hanafi madhhab, which expressly classifies covering the face as binding on women and forbids the exposure of the face in the presence of ghayr mahrams (strangers). While there have been dozens of works penned on this issue, we wish to focus on the Hanafi stance due to the abuse it is being subjected to. We ask Allah Most High to grant us the tawfiq (ability) to explain the issue in a manner pleasing to Him. Amin.

    2. The juristic definition of shahwah (desire)3. The Hanafi stance3.1. Types of gazes and their respective rulings3.1.1. A gaze accompanied with conviction of no possibility of attraction

    Also worthy of note is that this ruling has been recorded from none other than the great imam and mujtahid of the madhhab, Imam Abu Yusuf al-Qadi.[26] This ruling is not applicable to old women who have passed the age of being desired, as they have been clearly exempted from these rulings.[27]

    Thus, the authoritative position of the madhhab is that while looking at the face of a strange female is not completely forbidden when there exists conviction of no desire at all towards her, it would still be makruh tahrimi.
    3.1.2. A gaze accompanied with doubt of attraction

    This type of gaze has been classified as haram (forbidden).[28]

    3.1.3. A gaze accompanied with strong possibility or certainty of attraction

    This gaze is also been forbidden, just as the one before it.[29]

    3.2. The obligation of covering the face

    4. Conclusion

    We can thus conclude that it is obligatory on a man to lower his gaze from the face of strange women under all circumstances, just as it is binding on a woman to cover her face in the presence of strange men.

    Allah Most High knows best.

    Husain Kadodia
    14 Ramadan 1429 / 14 September 2008
    Durban, South Africa

    قال إمام الحرمين الجويني (ت 478 هـ): اتفق المسلمون على منع النساء من الخروج سافرات الوجوه

    جامع الرموز 2/305

    Leave a comment:


  • PurpleMuslimah
    replied
    Re: Niqaab....?

    Ok, here you go:

    It's unreasonable for either spouse to ask the other to do something that has no direct impact on the spouse making the request, but a major impact on the spouse who would actually be doing it. If she believes niqab is fard, she should wear it, and her husband's opinion on the matter is irrelevant. If she believes it's not fard, and doesn't want to wear it, then her husband's opinion is also irrelevant, because he's not the one who would be wearing it.

    It works both ways. I think my husband should sell his SUV and buy something more fuel-efficient, because he doesn't need it, and Muslims shouldn't be wasteful. However, it's not my decision, nor is it ultimately any of my business. I'm entitled to have an opinion, and express it in the proper manner, but I'm not entitled to expect him to act on every opinion I have just because I want him to.

    If he cared that much about it, he should have married a munaqabah. If he intended to 'change' that or anything else about her after marriage, he was wrong to not state that intention beforehand. The attitude of 'marry now, fix later' is why the divorce rate is so high.

    Leave a comment:


  • IbnulQayyim
    replied
    Re: Niqaab....?

    Originally posted by .mirror. View Post
    Don't just bump it, say something.
    Ok, Inshaa'Allah imam sahib

    Originally posted by Khalid b. Walid View Post
    He's increasing his post count. :o
    noo i want a proper discussion here im bored

    Leave a comment:


  • Khalid b. Walid
    replied
    Re: Niqaab....?

    Originally posted by .mirror. View Post
    Don't just bump it, say something.
    He's increasing his post count. :o

    Leave a comment:


  • .mirror.
    replied
    Re: Niqaab....?

    Don't just bump it, say something.

    Leave a comment:


  • IbnulQayyim
    replied
    Re: Niqaab....?

    bump

    Leave a comment:

Collapse

Edit this module to specify a template to display.

Working...
X