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Is homeschooling hard?

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  • notEVOLVED
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  • AbuNajm
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    Originally posted by AbuMubarak View Post
    That video barely talked about "sheltering" Muslim children at all. More like a plug for Daniel's products.

    There is no question that simply teaching Muslim children Quran is a form of "sheltering", even if a person wants to deny it.

    It is not "sheltering" a child when a parent methodically and carefully introduces subjects while explaining their opposition to right guidance and Islamic values at the appropriate time in their maturity and intellectual development.

    There are values contrary to Islam and subjects which are complicated and challenging to comprehend that a child will be exposed to by the mere fact of living in a non-Muslim country. The objective for Muslim parents is to keep those values and subjects away from children as long as possible until they have first formulated an instinctive acceptance for what is Islamic and repulsion for what is un-Islamic. Then, and only then, is it possible to slowly introduce matters for which they will be instinctively repulsed and their intellectual curiosity can be satiated in a healthy discussion through guided exposure.

    Simply pretending mainstream society is not there or that young Muslims will be able to take it in and instinctively reject it without the above approach is naive and irresponsible for parents.

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  • AbuNajm
    replied
    Muslim parents absolutely have an obligation to shelter their children from exposure to Shirk and Kufr through homeschooling and teaching their children from a young age that all of the things they might witness outside the home like dating, churches, temples, music, birthdays, halloween, christmas, easter, valentines decorations and others are all contrary to Islam and things which draw the anger of Allah AWJ.

    There is no way to shelter a Muslim child from Shirk and Kufr unless a parent homeschools because some of these things even find their way into "Islamic" schools and the children who attend them.

    Just to be clear- as difficult and challenging as homeschooling can be, there is no such thing as failing a Muslim child through homeschooling. The biggest failure is exposing one's children to mainstream society in non-Muslim countries through their education system.

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  • AbuMubarak
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  • notEVOLVED
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    78% of peer-reviewed studies on academic achievement show homeschool students perform statistically significantly better than those in institutional schools (Ray, 2017).

    87% of peer-reviewed studies on social, emotional, and psychological development show homeschool students perform statistically significantly better than those in conventional schools (Ray, 2017).

    https://www.nheri.org/research-facts-on-homeschooling

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  • Fectiv
    replied
    Ask Allaah to provide you with enough finances to afford the Islamic school. May Allaah help you.

    I suggest you visit the Islamic schools and talk to them and see. The fees may be lower than what you have heard. Or they may even agree to give some scholarship or something?

    See if there are other Islamic schools in the city.

    Talk to other Muslim parents in the masjid and ask them for suggestions on public schools. They might give you the names of some schools that are not too bad.

    Homeschooling: My kids are not homeschooled. But when I spend 2-4 hours teaching them, they benefit more than the time they spend at school. You could set 30 minutes for each year of age. For example, a 4-year-old spends 2 hours colouring, cutting, pasting, and learning. And a 10-year-old would spend 5 hours (with breaks in between) for all their learning activities.

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  • notEVOLVED
    replied
    I once heard a Sheikh saying that parents should not be sending their kids to school before they are 7 (or 6). Because they're the most vital years of the child and the most effective time for tarbiyyah.

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  • Morose
    replied
    I have not read the thread, however, I add my thoughts to the conversation if you’ll suffer to have them.

    I can understand the desire to homeschool in today’s environment and I think it is a good idea, in principle. However, besides the great deal of hard work and dedication it requires, for homeschooling is no easy undertaking, it is also important to bear in mind the child’s social skills, particularly if it is probable that he or she will have to work among non-Muslims in their adult lives.

    Of course, this very consideration is the precise reason why most choose to homeschool (to avoid the negatives of socialising with non-Muslims), and yet, it is also necessary for proper functioning within a non-Muslim society (specifically, a work environment).

    Without social interactions at a young age, children can become shy, awkward, diffident creatures in their adult age and therefore experience difficulties at work (or even attending job interviews).

    I think therefore, if you choose to homeschool, you could balance this with extracurricular activities (such as sports or some other club for children). This way, the child is able to socialise, however in a controlled environment without negative influences.

    But then again, I am not a parent so maybe I am talking bakwaas. Sheer and utter bakwaas.

    I am just grateful I managed to get my education done during a time when things were not so bad.

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  • AbuNajm
    replied
    Originally posted by .khayriyyah. View Post

    Did your son have to study for the SAT/ACT? And do you happen to know if homeschooling would effect the chances of a student getting accepted into universities in the Muslim world?

    But is it easier for their parent/educator? My concern was with being overburneded with managing multiple children on different levels and eventually burning out.
    He did not study for the ACT/SAT. Many universities have stopped requiring those scores for entrance.

    Instead of worrying about what all universities require, try to narrow down specific universities where you want your children to qualify for. Then, look at their requirements and make sure to meet them in the course of your homeschooling.

    To prevent burnout for homeschool teachers, use the curricula available online. Use the resources available like Khan Academy and other platforms which have teaching modules.

    It's always much harder in the beginning because at the younger ages, children require much more one on one attention. As they get older, the teaching can be more automated and self-study oriented.

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  • Abu julaybeeb
    replied
    Originally posted by .khayriyyah. View Post

    Did your son have to study for the SAT/ACT? And do you happen to know if homeschooling would effect the chances of a student getting accepted into universities in the Muslim world?

    But is it easier for their parent/educator? My concern was with being overburneded with managing multiple children on different levels and eventually burning out.
    You can refer to facebook posts by Umm Khalid wife of danial haqiqatchou

    They have multiple children all in elementary school age range they home school

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  • Ya'sin
    replied
    I have been following a lady on YouTube for many years, she homeschools all are kids.

    I find her videos helpful even though it is a different curriculum and country.

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  • .khayriyyah.
    replied
    Originally posted by AbuNajm View Post
    We only used the math and language arts subjects [sorry, also science] because the other subjects are pretty much indoctrination into Kufr and Shirk and they're also useless when it comes to university studies.

    These days, as long as you're willing to pay for university in the USA, then anyone can get accepted, even with a GED. As long as your child can pass the General Educational Development exam, then they can be admitted to many universities.

    Studying for the GED exam is easy for a child who has been studying math and language arts up to the 12th grade level. The social studies part of the GED exam is easy to study for last minute.

    Our son studied around 3 hours per day on average. Some days more and some days less.

    Children generally do better with individual attention. Studying in groups has more to do with socialization or economics than academic achievement.
    Did your son have to study for the SAT/ACT? And do you happen to know if homeschooling would effect the chances of a student getting accepted into universities in the Muslim world?

    But is it easier for their parent/educator? My concern was with being overburneded with managing multiple children on different levels and eventually burning out.
    Last edited by .khayriyyah.; 08-06-22, 07:08 PM.

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  • AbuMubarak
    replied
    Originally posted by Layla_ View Post
    Salam

    Ok so I've been thinking about homeschooling for a while now as my eldest is approaching school age. State school for me is a big no no, would have liked to send to an Islamic school but I may potentially be a single mum and obv won't have the finances. Plus, a lot of Islamic school teachers are not qualified, so surely I can teach just as well as them?!

    But, is it hard...obviously you need to spend time and money on homeschooling but can a single mum really do this with no other support? How long do you homeschool for anyway...what if my kids want to go to college / uni ?

    Tell me all you know about homeschooling!
    An interesting observation after watching 40+ years of Muslims homeschooling

    It is not hard, but it take a certain type of mother to handle it. Some try without the correct attitude, and they fail. Some try without proper planning, and they fail. Some try without researching what's needed to be successful and they fail

    Seems like the only successful ones are those who understand the dedication, planning, attitude needed to be successful

    But it can be done. I have seen it done, very successfully

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  • AbuNajm
    replied
    Originally posted by .khayriyyah. View Post

    I hope you don't mind, but I have some questions.

    Why did you only use math and language arts curriculum from these online schools and not other subjects? Did this effect his chances of getting accepted into university?

    How long did it take for him to reach proficiency in these subjects and how many hours did he study each day?

    Do you think it would be easier to have children of a similar age group (about 1-3 years apart) and teach them all at the same time rather than have them go through secular studies separately?
    We only used the math and language arts subjects [sorry, also science] because the other subjects are pretty much indoctrination into Kufr and Shirk and they're also useless when it comes to university studies.

    These days, as long as you're willing to pay for university in the USA, then anyone can get accepted, even with a GED. As long as your child can pass the General Educational Development exam, then they can be admitted to many universities.

    Studying for the GED exam is easy for a child who has been studying math and language arts up to the 12th grade level. The social studies part of the GED exam is easy to study for last minute.

    Our son studied around 3 hours per day on average. Some days more and some days less.

    Children generally do better with individual attention. Studying in groups has more to do with socialization or economics than academic achievement.

    Leave a comment:


  • .khayriyyah.
    replied
    Originally posted by AbuNajm View Post

    We homeschooled our son who is now getting his BA, in sha Allah. My wife did 95% of the work. We used a lot of online curricula and only used the math and language arts elements of them. The rest of the homeschool curriculum was Arabic studies, recitation, Tajweed, and a lot of writing exercises.

    Don't waste time with 99% of the "Islamic schools". They are 90% secular education and 10% Arabic/Islamic studies. I know because I have been hired to put together lesson plans for elementary school children.

    It is extremely difficult to homeschool children. It takes a lot of dedication and perseverance from the parents.
    I hope you don't mind, but I have some questions.

    Why did you only use math and language arts curriculum from these online schools and not other subjects? Did this effect his chances of getting accepted into university?

    How long did it take for him to reach proficiency in these subjects and how many hours did he study each day?

    Do you think it would be easier to have children of a similar age group (about 1-3 years apart) and teach them all at the same time rather than have them go through secular studies separately?
    Last edited by .khayriyyah.; 08-06-22, 02:43 AM.

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