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Is homeschooling hard?

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  • Red Apples
    replied
    Re: Is homeschooling hard?

    Originally posted by Layla_ View Post
    Salam

    Ok so I've been thinking about homeschooling for a while now as my eldest is approaching school age. State school for me is a big no no, would have liked to send to an Islamic school but I may potentially be a single mum and obv won't have the finances. Plus, a lot of Islamic school teachers are not qualified, so surely I can teach just as well as them?!

    But, is it hard...obviously you need to spend time and money on homeschooling but can a single mum really do this with no other support? How long do you homeschool for anyway...what if my kids want to go to college / uni ?

    Tell me all you know about homeschooling!
    Salaam
    Are you referring to homeschooling in the UK (Which i can write an entire book about)
    If not UK - then unfortunately I wouldn't be able to say much as the syllabus and content etc differs from country to country.

    Leave a comment:


  • Layla_
    replied
    Re: Is homeschooling hard?

    Originally posted by neelu View Post
    Walaykum salam,

    A number of my fb friends home school their children; some in the UK and some in the US. Sadly one of the UK mums has been forced to place her children in state school against her wishes. As a single mum on benefits, she was told that she has to be available for work (and training courses) if she wishes to continue getting benefits (and i think this applies to tax credits as well). She explained that she home schools but was told that if her children weren't enrolled in school, she'd lose her benefits.

    We talked about potential loopholes but none of those were viable options for her. For example; one loophole is to say you're available during those hours and arrange for a friend/sitter/family member to watch the kids when you're not at home- she would've been allowed to continue home schooling if she knew someone who could watch the kids when she's not at home.

    She was very successful at home schooling, in fact I think she used the term "unschooling" which means it's not like a traditional classroom set up. I mean, the kids were taught the usual reading, writing, arithmetic etc, but also a lot of their learning would involve things like going to parks and woods (the kids were under 7 at the time), partly to play, partly to spend time outdoors with fresh air and partly to learn about the different types of leaves, seasons, trees and plants etc so it still involves learning but not in a traditional classroom way. Her children have a much higher reading age than their actual ages and are academically bright so this form of learning hasn't hindered their progress.

    There are facebook groups for home school parents to find resources, websites that offer learning courses for various key stages, where to get free or low price resources and a lot of posts on personal experiences of dealing with a kid who keeps disrupting an older sibling or other day to day challenges like that. I think one grandparent dealt with home schooling by paying for a computer course that offered a lot of the texts and resources for the main type of school curriculum subjects online. So there's a range of parents from the unschoolers who DIY it by completely rewriting the rule book on what they think education should consist of on their own terms- to the opposite end where someone buys a reputable course online that covers the main subjects her teen needed to learn to get his qualifications.

    I know one page is called "abi homeschools too", I can't remember the others. From what I know of the other home schooler parents, the main thing you need is confidence. There is such a strong culture of society telling parents that children MUST be in school and if they aren't then "how will they learn to socialise with other kids their own age?" and the typical questions like that, which I also asked before I knew better. It leads parents to lack the self esteem to take it on themselves, so if you have the confidence, then the next step is to connect with other parents experienced in this, make a plan as to what you want your child to learn and what resources and steps you'll need to get there and take it from there. If you feel you can't do it alone, find other home school parents in your area, meet up and maybe you can help each other out and so on.
    Subhanallah, I'm unsure how I missed your post but :jkk: great post. I looked into unschooling and it really interested me. I have applied for a place for my daughter for school for next year. The more I look into it, I don't think homeschooling is for me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ni'mah
    replied
    Re: Is homeschooling hard?

    Originally posted by neelu View Post
    Walaykum salam,

    A number of my fb friends home school their children; some in the UK and some in the US. Sadly one of the UK mums has been forced to place her children in state school against her wishes. As a single mum on benefits, she was told that she has to be available for work (and training courses) if she wishes to continue getting benefits (and i think this applies to tax credits as well). She explained that she home schools but was told that if her children weren't enrolled in school, she'd lose her benefits.

    We talked about potential loopholes but none of those were viable options for her. For example; one loophole is to say you're available during those hours and arrange for a friend/sitter/family member to watch the kids when you're not at home- she would've been allowed to continue home schooling if she knew someone who could watch the kids when she's not at home.

    She was very successful at home schooling, in fact I think she used the term "unschooling" which means it's not like a traditional classroom set up. I mean, the kids were taught the usual reading, writing, arithmetic etc, but also a lot of their learning would involve things like going to parks and woods (the kids were under 7 at the time), partly to play, partly to spend time outdoors with fresh air and partly to learn about the different types of leaves, seasons, trees and plants etc so it still involves learning but not in a traditional classroom way. Her children have a much higher reading age than their actual ages and are academically bright so this form of learning hasn't hindered their progress.

    There are facebook groups for home school parents to find resources, websites that offer learning courses for various key stages, where to get free or low price resources and a lot of posts on personal experiences of dealing with a kid who keeps disrupting an older sibling or other day to day challenges like that. I think one grandparent dealt with home schooling by paying for a computer course that offered a lot of the texts and resources for the main type of school curriculum subjects online. So there's a range of parents from the unschoolers who DIY it by completely rewriting the rule book on what they think education should consist of on their own terms- to the opposite end where someone buys a reputable course online that covers the main subjects her teen needed to learn to get his qualifications.

    I know one page is called "abi homeschools too", I can't remember the others. From what I know of the other home schooler parents, the main thing you need is confidence. There is such a strong culture of society telling parents that children MUST be in school and if they aren't then "how will they learn to socialise with other kids their own age?" and the typical questions like that, which I also asked before I knew better. It leads parents to lack the self esteem to take it on themselves, so if you have the confidence, then the next step is to connect with other parents experienced in this, make a plan as to what you want your child to learn and what resources and steps you'll need to get there and take it from there. If you feel you can't do it alone, find other home school parents in your area, meet up and maybe you can help each other out and so on.
    Solid post. It definitely takes a lot of courage to deviate from the norm. My sister has opted to homeschool and the questions/judgement from other mothers is constant. We forget that, anyone who is a parent is already a teacher by default.

    Abi homeschool too is an awesome resource, I also like Elizabeth Hanson (she's an education consultant) who has homeschooled her children. She follows the classical education approach. There are so many methods and approaches to home schooling, so parents need to do the research beforehand to be clear about their objectives.

    Un-schooling, sounds interesting and probably requires a lot more creativity.

    Leave a comment:


  • neelu
    replied
    Re: Is homeschooling hard?

    Walaykum salam,

    A number of my fb friends home school their children; some in the UK and some in the US. Sadly one of the UK mums has been forced to place her children in state school against her wishes. As a single mum on benefits, she was told that she has to be available for work (and training courses) if she wishes to continue getting benefits (and i think this applies to tax credits as well). She explained that she home schools but was told that if her children weren't enrolled in school, she'd lose her benefits.

    We talked about potential loopholes but none of those were viable options for her. For example; one loophole is to say you're available during those hours and arrange for a friend/sitter/family member to watch the kids when you're not at home- she would've been allowed to continue home schooling if she knew someone who could watch the kids when she's not at home.

    She was very successful at home schooling, in fact I think she used the term "unschooling" which means it's not like a traditional classroom set up. I mean, the kids were taught the usual reading, writing, arithmetic etc, but also a lot of their learning would involve things like going to parks and woods (the kids were under 7 at the time), partly to play, partly to spend time outdoors with fresh air and partly to learn about the different types of leaves, seasons, trees and plants etc so it still involves learning but not in a traditional classroom way. Her children have a much higher reading age than their actual ages and are academically bright so this form of learning hasn't hindered their progress.

    There are facebook groups for home school parents to find resources, websites that offer learning courses for various key stages, where to get free or low price resources and a lot of posts on personal experiences of dealing with a kid who keeps disrupting an older sibling or other day to day challenges like that. I think one grandparent dealt with home schooling by paying for a computer course that offered a lot of the texts and resources for the main type of school curriculum subjects online. So there's a range of parents from the unschoolers who DIY it by completely rewriting the rule book on what they think education should consist of on their own terms- to the opposite end where someone buys a reputable course online that covers the main subjects her teen needed to learn to get his qualifications.

    I know one page is called "abi homeschools too", I can't remember the others. From what I know of the other home schooler parents, the main thing you need is confidence. There is such a strong culture of society telling parents that children MUST be in school and if they aren't then "how will they learn to socialise with other kids their own age?" and the typical questions like that, which I also asked before I knew better. It leads parents to lack the self esteem to take it on themselves, so if you have the confidence, then the next step is to connect with other parents experienced in this, make a plan as to what you want your child to learn and what resources and steps you'll need to get there and take it from there. If you feel you can't do it alone, find other home school parents in your area, meet up and maybe you can help each other out and so on.

    Leave a comment:


  • Layla_
    replied
    Re: Is homeschooling hard?

    Originally posted by pronorah View Post
    It certainly helps. There are truckloads of "Teach English Online" sites that desperately try to hire online teachers:


    You may also want to look at what British Council says about teaching online. They clearly think that it is a great idea, and a real opportunity for English language majors, but also that you should try to avoid the "pitfalls". These sites seem to pay $20+ per hour or more (sometimes also less) for this job. So, it is not a "get rich quick" scheme, but it can clearly help you paying the inevitable bills left, right, and center. You will still need common sense, though, concerning payment and working conditions. There is really nothing that can exempt you from being alert and knowing what you are doing.

    There are also firms that cater to the business crowd with "Commercial English" and things like that. They pay even more for one-to-one tuition for their staff (and executives). This is often the cheapest way out for them. Just let someone call in a few hours a week and talk in English with someone who is generally useful to the company, but should also be able to talk in English with customers or suppliers.

    Then, there are also the local-market opportunities that should be not too bad. Even in the poorest countries there are parents who are financially able -- and are more than happy -- to send their kids for private English classes to your house. It is a really interesting opportunity to make money when you need to stay at home to keep an eye on the kids too. You can even add a few of such "external kids" to the classes you would give to your own children. Then, you would even get paid to basically teach your own kids!
    Jazakallah khayr

    When I graduated I was doing proof reading for Saudi students (females) for their masters but I stopped as sometimes they expect you to do the work for them

    I think I am going to educate myself on the national literacy curriculum & offer tuition to children and it will also help my children too if I decide to go ahead with the homeschooling. Thanks for the idea I hadn't actually thought about tuition in a long time

    Leave a comment:


  • pronorah
    replied
    Re: Is homeschooling hard?

    Originally posted by Layla_ View Post
    I have a degree in English, if that helps...
    It certainly helps. There are truckloads of "Teach English Online" sites that desperately try to hire online teachers:


    You may also want to look at what British Council says about teaching online. They clearly think that it is a great idea, and a real opportunity for English language majors, but also that you should try to avoid the "pitfalls". These sites seem to pay $20+ per hour or more (sometimes also less) for this job. So, it is not a "get rich quick" scheme, but it can clearly help you paying the inevitable bills left, right, and center. You will still need common sense, though, concerning payment and working conditions. There is really nothing that can exempt you from being alert and knowing what you are doing.

    There are also firms that cater to the business crowd with "Commercial English" and things like that. They pay even more for one-to-one tuition for their staff (and executives). This is often the cheapest way out for them. Just let someone call in a few hours a week and talk in English with someone who is generally useful to the company, but should also be able to talk in English with customers or suppliers.

    Then, there are also the local-market opportunities that should be not too bad. Even in the poorest countries there are parents who are financially able -- and are more than happy -- to send their kids for private English classes to your house. It is a really interesting opportunity to make money when you need to stay at home to keep an eye on the kids too. You can even add a few of such "external kids" to the classes you would give to your own children. Then, you would even get paid to basically teach your own kids!

    Leave a comment:


  • Layla_
    replied
    Re: Is homeschooling hard?

    Originally posted by pronorah View Post
    Salaam,

    From looking at your post, your level of literacy is more than enough to do the homeschooling by yourself, unless you are really poor at arithmetic. That is something that your post does not reveal, of course. I just suppose that you can handle that as well. The materials only become more challenging at A levels. Until then, I suspect that you should be able to handle it by yourself. No need to worry. The kids would certainly not do better by sitting in a rowdy class with twenty other pupils vying for an often burnt out state-school teacher's attention. For A levels, there are lots of sites like tutor.com where your children could access a specialized subject teacher for their advanced questions. Furthermore, at that age, they should probably just learn how to "Google" for things anyway.
    Salaam

    I have a degree in English, if that helps...

    Math is most certainly not my strongest subject, however, I'm sure i can manage till at least secondary school age

    I'm still confused about homeschooling. Im just not sure I have the patience

    Leave a comment:


  • Layla_
    replied
    Re: Is homeschooling hard?

    Originally posted by Indefinable View Post
    I'm looking forward to this challenge. It's a huge commitment (and I tend to have commitment issues lol)

    But - I'm thinking/planning In Shaa Allaah - to start homeschooling my son when he is 11, so he doesn't attend the local Secondary School. I've sort of looked into the curriculum, and what subjects I'd like to teach him.

    Short listed it to the following:
    English (Literature/Language), Mathematics, Science (Bio/Chem/Phys), Islamic History, Secular History, Islamic Studies, Arabic, Religious Studies (Secular), Qur'aan/Tajweed.

    So basically build him up/teach him so he can gain all those GCSEs In Sha Allaah.

    Wishful thinking. I'm not sure how feasible it is, it's not impossible, it is manageable though I reckon. In Sha Allaah.

    Just needs to be planned accordingly I think.
    Sounds good Insha Allah: yes it is defo manageable Insha Allah depending on how it's all planned out but secondary home schooling seems a lot easier than primary home schooling

    Leave a comment:


  • pronorah
    replied
    Re: Is homeschooling hard?

    Originally posted by Layla_ View Post
    Salam

    Ok so I've been thinking about homeschooling for a while now as my eldest is approaching school age. State school for me is a big no no, would have liked to send to an Islamic school but I may potentially be a single mum and obv won't have the finances. Plus, a lot of Islamic school teachers are not qualified, so surely I can teach just as well as them?!

    But, is it hard...obviously you need to spend time and money on homeschooling but can a single mum really do this with no other support? How long do you homeschool for anyway...what if my kids want to go to college / uni ?

    Tell me all you know about homeschooling!
    Salaam,

    From looking at your post, your level of literacy is more than enough to do the homeschooling by yourself, unless you are really poor at arithmetic. That is something that your post does not reveal, of course. I just suppose that you can handle that as well. The materials only become more challenging at A levels. Until then, I suspect that you should be able to handle it by yourself. No need to worry. The kids would certainly not do better by sitting in a rowdy class with twenty other pupils vying for an often burnt out state-school teacher's attention. For A levels, there are lots of sites like tutor.com where your children could access a specialized subject teacher for their advanced questions. Furthermore, at that age, they should probably just learn how to "Google" for things anyway.

    Leave a comment:


  • Indefinable
    replied
    Re: Is homeschooling hard?

    Originally posted by Layla_ View Post
    Jazakallah khayr, yes defo need a structure

    Yes I don't think it's for me. I think maybe once the primary years are over I will consider it Insha Allah. Too bad I didn't apply for a space from September and everywhere is full :|
    I'm looking forward to this challenge. It's a huge commitment (and I tend to have commitment issues lol)

    But - I'm thinking/planning In Shaa Allaah - to start homeschooling my son when he is 11, so he doesn't attend the local Secondary School. I've sort of looked into the curriculum, and what subjects I'd like to teach him.

    Short listed it to the following:
    English (Literature/Language), Mathematics, Science (Bio/Chem/Phys), Islamic History, Secular History, Islamic Studies, Arabic, Religious Studies (Secular), Qur'aan/Tajweed.

    So basically build him up/teach him so he can gain all those GCSEs In Sha Allaah.

    Wishful thinking. I'm not sure how feasible it is, it's not impossible, it is manageable though I reckon. In Sha Allaah.

    Just needs to be planned accordingly I think.

    Leave a comment:


  • Layla_
    replied
    Re: Is homeschooling hard?

    Originally posted by Sister_2009 View Post
    Preschool is still young. I homeschooled mine during high school. I would suggest using a structured program, something that has your days planned out. I would have found it difficult if we did not have that structure, preplanned curriculum. Plus, with smaller children you really need to have one-on-one teaching time, whereas with older kids they can read and do a lot on their own. If it's really something you don't think you will be able to continue, I would go for the school route.
    Jazakallah khayr, yes defo need a structure

    Yes I don't think it's for me. I think maybe once the primary years are over I will consider it Insha Allah. Too bad I didn't apply for a space from September and everywhere is full :|

    Leave a comment:


  • Sister_2009
    replied
    Re: Is homeschooling hard?

    Originally posted by Layla_ View Post
    I am from the UK, East Midlands. Yes it is great but I really am starting to think it's not for me. I've got another year of it to fully make up my mind as I've not registered my daughter for her reception place this sep
    Preschool is still young. I homeschooled mine during high school. I would suggest using a structured program, something that has your days planned out. I would have found it difficult if we did not have that structure, preplanned curriculum. Plus, with smaller children you really need to have one-on-one teaching time, whereas with older kids they can read and do a lot on their own. If it's really something you don't think you will be able to continue, I would go for the school route.

    Leave a comment:


  • Layla_
    replied
    Re: Is homeschooling hard?

    Originally posted by Umm Fatimah View Post
    Just saw your daughter is still pre-school, you should be concentrating on having fun and lots of play :D Don't put any pressure on yourself, she isn't even school aged yet and yes if you decide that you feel it isn't for you then you can explore other options. After all of these years I now believe that home education isn't for everyone and not everyone is for home education lol.

    its great alhamdulillah no one will see your child she'll always remain in at home with honour and her hijab always protected.

    I'm not really sure that the purpose of home education should be a child always being at home with no one seeing her? I have met a few families like this and their children ended up in the care system.
    You're right lol, I guess I'm just getting ahead of myself. I'm that pushy parent. I really need to relax and calm down! Lol

    Leave a comment:


  • Umm Fatimah
    replied
    Re: Is homeschooling hard?

    Just saw your daughter is still pre-school, you should be concentrating on having fun and lots of play :D Don't put any pressure on yourself, she isn't even school aged yet and yes if you decide that you feel it isn't for you then you can explore other options. After all of these years I now believe that home education isn't for everyone and not everyone is for home education lol.

    its great alhamdulillah no one will see your child she'll always remain in at home with honour and her hijab always protected.

    I'm not really sure that the purpose of home education should be a child always being at home with no one seeing her? I have met a few families like this and their children ended up in the care system.

    Leave a comment:


  • Layla_
    replied
    Re: Is homeschooling hard?

    Originally posted by babadods View Post
    dont ... not yet keep going and fight on!
    where are you from? i might know some families that can help in homeschooling etc
    btw i helped homeschool my sister back when she needed it and im telling you its great alhamdulillah no one will see your child she'll always remain in at home with honour and her hijab always protected.
    I am from the UK, East Midlands. Yes it is great but I really am starting to think it's not for me. I've got another year of it to fully make up my mind as I've not registered my daughter for her reception place this sep

    Leave a comment:

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