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Should little girls wear headscarves?

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  • Should little girls wear headscarves?

    This is something thats confusing to me when it comes to peoples perception of it, especially Muslims today.

    Kids obviously don't have an obligation to maintain hijab and cover their awrah, since they're kids. But that doesn't mean we let them be naked everywhere until they hit puberty, we still teach them to cover their awrah, but if they don't follow it fully then its not their fault.

    When it comes to the awrah for women, theres no distinction between the genitals and the head, they're both awrah that need to be covered in public. So why does it seem like a significant amount of Muslim parents if not most, are against the idea of getting their girls to wear the headscarf at an early age? Like when you teach them to pray and they're with you in salah, you still teach them to have hijab and modesty infront of Allah(SWT), but that after salah its ok to not where the headscarf in public?

    I just wanna understand why that is, so that if I have a daughter in the future, inshallah, should I get her to wear it or do I wait until she's old enough? Its like we say ok heres the dress code, part of it you have to always keep, the other part you don't have to wear until you become of age and it actually matters. Maybe this is also why when girls become women its becoming harder these days for them to transition to wearing full hijab, since they're not used to it.

  • #2
    There is no need for confusion, it is clear in shariah. Personally I've never seen girls walking around exposing their genitals (or was that an exaggeration?). My daughters started early because I pushed that but in hindsight this was wrong and I advise others now to be mindful of shariah. There are Muslims who (wrongly) believe that girls are a fitna and should be covered up - I'm talking about 5 year old here - and I think that is sexualizing children which we need to be very wary of.
    I instilled the notion of awrah very early on for my children, so I wouldn't openly change their nappy in front of people, and they were always covered to the knee. I get surprised sometimes when I see a young girl with a religious looking mother who is wearing hot pants and a spaghetti strap top, but I remind myself that this is not wrong, it is just not my preference. I really hate to see sisters shaming their young daughters for not wearing abaya or for playing etc, that is very dangerous IMO.

    ETA: I think the sisters who take hijab off often cite the reason that they were forced into it from an early age and then as a result feel it imprisoned them. As I said I have changed my mind over the years about this, I think we should encourage our daughters to wear it from a young age but not actually enforce it until it becomes compulsory (or at least after 10). Hijab isn't just a piece of cloth, it is a code of conduct. Children have the right to be allowed to be children, we shouldn't make their Islam hard on them.
    Last edited by UmmAbdullah86; 19-09-21, 06:19 AM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by UmmAbdullah86 View Post
      There is no need for confusion, it is clear in shariah. Personally I've never seen girls walking around exposing their genitals (or was that an exaggeration?). My daughters started early because I pushed that but in hindsight this was wrong and I advise others now to be mindful of shariah. There are Muslims who (wrongly) believe that girls are a fitna and should be covered up - I'm talking about 5 year old here - and I think that is sexualizing children which we need to be very wary of.
      I instilled the notion of awrah very early on for my children, so I wouldn't openly change their nappy in front of people, and they were always covered to the knee. I get surprised sometimes when I see a young girl with a religious looking mother who is wearing hot pants and a spaghetti strap top, but I remind myself that this is not wrong, it is just not my preference. I really hate to see sisters shaming their young daughters for not wearing abaya or for playing etc, that is very dangerous IMO.

      ETA: I think the sisters who take hijab off often cite the reason that they were forced into it from an early age and then as a result feel it imprisoned them. As I said I have changed my mind over the years about this, I think we should encourage our daughters to wear it from a young age but not actually enforce it until it becomes compulsory (or at least after 10). Hijab isn't just a piece of cloth, it is a code of conduct. Children have the right to be allowed to be children, we shouldn't make their Islam hard on them.
      Ya this is what I mean with the confusion. You make a distinction between what needs to be covered for children and the headscarf, where is this coming from? You say that putting on a headscarf will sexualize them, yet you still clothed them to a point that you saw fit and and wouldn't change their nappy in public. You get what I'm trying to say?

      Like where is this difference between the head/hair and the rest of the awrah, coming from, because as far as I know, Islam does not make a distinction between them? I think this obsession with the headscarf only really came to be because of modern western culture.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Mufti Cheesecake View Post

        Ya this is what I mean with the confusion. You make a distinction between what needs to be covered for children and the headscarf, where is this coming from? You say that putting on a headscarf will sexualize them, yet you still clothed them to a point that you saw fit and and wouldn't change their nappy in public. You get what I'm trying to say?

        Like where is this difference between the head/hair and the rest of the awrah, coming from, because as far as I know, Islam does not make a distinction between them? I think this obsession with the headscarf only really came to be because of modern western culture.
        There is a MASSIVE difference between the genitals and the head. I follow the opinion that the major awrah (between navel to knees) should always be covered. Islam does make a distinction between them. I will try to get some proof now inshaAllah.

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        • #5
          https://islamqa.org/hanafi/darululoo...ren-in-public/

          https://seekersguidance.org/answers/...s-young-child/
          ​​​​​​​

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          • #6
            Originally posted by UmmAbdullah86 View Post

            There is a MASSIVE difference between the genitals and the head. I follow the opinion that the major awrah (between navel to knees) should always be covered. Islam does make a distinction between them. I will try to get some proof now inshaAllah.
            I know between the navels to the knees is the awrah for women when they're infront of other women, but I've never heard anything about major awrah, and I can't find anything about it. I'm talking about the awrah in public which for women is required to be covered. For children there is no ruling.

            I don't like using IslamQA org, because its an aggregate site that compiles opinions from different sites of random alims, a lot of times you can't trace it back and find them, or who they are, especially when it comes to opinions like these where they don't offer the evidence. Similarly with seekers guidance. Basically theres nothing objective in shariah that says that there is a major awrah, seems like this has been just up to the discretion of scholars.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Mufti Cheesecake View Post

              I know between the navels to the knees is the awrah for women when they're infront of other women, but I've never heard anything about major awrah, and I can't find anything about it. I'm talking about the awrah in public which for women is required to be covered. For children there is no ruling.

              I don't like using IslamQA org, because its an aggregate site that compiles opinions from different sites of random alims, a lot of times you can't trace it back and find them, or who they are, especially when it comes to opinions like these where they don't offer the evidence. Similarly with seekers guidance. Basically theres nothing objective in shariah that says that there is a major awrah, seems like this has been just up to the discretion of scholars.
              I'm not necessarily advocating either of these sites, just showing that there is difference of opinion. Yes it would be good to know how the scholars arrived at these conclusions.
              Do you mean about the daleel for women's hijab in public?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Mufti Cheesecake View Post
                This is something thats confusing to me when it comes to peoples perception of it, especially Muslims today.

                Kids obviously don't have an obligation to maintain hijab and cover their awrah, since they're kids. But that doesn't mean we let them be naked everywhere until they hit puberty, we still teach them to cover their awrah, but if they don't follow it fully then its not their fault.

                When it comes to the awrah for women, theres no distinction between the genitals and the head, they're both awrah that need to be covered in public. So why does it seem like a significant amount of Muslim parents if not most, are against the idea of getting their girls to wear the headscarf at an early age? Like when you teach them to pray and they're with you in salah, you still teach them to have hijab and modesty infront of Allah(SWT), but that after salah its ok to not where the headscarf in public?

                I just wanna understand why that is, so that if I have a daughter in the future, inshallah, should I get her to wear it or do I wait until she's old enough? Its like we say ok heres the dress code, part of it you have to always keep, the other part you don't have to wear until you become of age and it actually matters. Maybe this is also why when girls become women its becoming harder these days for them to transition to wearing full hijab, since they're not used to it.
                A child is a child. You cannot compare genitals to hair. A non muslim woman and non practising woman will have her hair out but never her genitals (in public). We don’t ‘teach’ our children that this needs to be covered either, it’s a natural thing to do and even when Adam and Hawa had no concept of awra, they covered their private parts. Non Muslim children have their private parts covered but that doesn’t mean their parents are teaching them this, it’s just not a part of the body that has ever been exposed publically.

                Feet is also awrah and so is everything apart from hands and face (the opinion I follow) does that mean that i should cover my child up in socks in summer because there is no distinction between the awra of the genitals And feet? Let’s not forget that when we cover the awra your clothes are not supposed to be tight/see through so what should children be dressed in?

                https://islamicgemsandpearls.wordpress.com

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                • #9
                  Not just girls even boys must cover their awra from young age you allow the girls to wear short clothing the boy to wear short clothing then when they grow up they get used wearing harram and feel no shame in dressing in that manner

                  We make it seem as if its ok in sports for man to be half naked and women not which is wrong both have awra that needs covering

                  Even in fron of your own family

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                  • #10
                    Personally as long as you showcase or practice religion they will follow, but I don’t think you should make them cover their hair if they’re not ready or have the desire themselves. Also just cause a women or anyone covers doesn’t make them religious or an angle…they’re still human. As for the part where children walk around showing off skin, if you’re not comfortable with it then don’t let your kids do that. Also I feel like once the child is like eight or nine or even ten that’s when parents really start changing what they wear. So they go from sleeveless to sleeves. The reason for this is because they’re children, they get hot easily if they’re covered fully in the heat and it’s okay for them to show some skin…I think. The reason for this is because they’re kids they’re still learning. And yes it’s up to the parents if they’re covering the kids up or not. But usually when they’re younger they wear some skin showing clothes. And for the hijab PLEASE don’t force it, I wore it in fifth grade as a choice and took it off. I recently started wearing it again. My sisters use to wear it but only for my dad, and they stopped cause…look if you force your kids, they’ll do things behind your back.

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                    • #11
                      As a father of six grown women, and grandfather of 8 granddaughters, i will say this

                      the best teacher is example, so if your mothers, sisters, aunties cover properly, the girls will follow suit at a young age, it will be a natural thing for them, no different than wearing pants/skirts

                      when they do hit the ages of 10-15 covering wont be an issue, it will be natural

                      waiting until they are 13 to start covering is a recipe for disaster
                      .لا نريد زعيما يخاف البيت الإبيض
                      نريد زعيما يخاف الواحد الأحد
                      دولة الإسلامية باقية





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                      • #12
                        It should never be an expectation for young prepubescent children to wear hijab. The first important thing here isn't what they wear as kids, but what they are taught about hijab and appropriate codes of conduct and the importance of living by rules of halal and haram. I heard once a long time ago that apparently a lot of our vitamin D gets absorbed from sun exposure at a young age, so it's important for children to show some skin when they go outside (obviously lengthy sun exposure when it's hot and sunny can risk sunburn so that should be very limited and actually kids should go outside to play when the weather is not too bright so not at zuhr time for example).

                        I agree with allowing younger kids to wear sleeveless clothes and then as they edge towards the end of the primary years, they should start wearing sleeves and gradually encouraged towards more Islamic attire as they get older. I think if a young child wants to wear a headscarf to copy mummy then it's okay, but other than that, young children shouldn't be pressured into wearing it.
                        The Lyme Disease pandemic: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z5u73ME4sVU

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by AbuMubarak View Post
                          As a father of six grown women, and grandfather of 8 granddaughters, i will say this

                          the best teacher is example, so if your mothers, sisters, aunties cover properly, the girls will follow suit at a young age, it will be a natural thing for them, no different than wearing pants/skirts

                          when they do hit the ages of 10-15 covering wont be an issue, it will be natural

                          waiting until they are 13 to start covering is a recipe for disaster
                          I used to agree with that (that the child will naturally follow the mother) but in recent years I see a very different trend. I also know a lot of sisters who 'tone down' their hijab after marriage, because they were only dressing a certain way because of pressure from their parents. One of my daughters struggles with hijab, despite having lots of positive role models.

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                          • #14
                            The comparison with genitals is extreme but you are correct in saying that the 'hijab' (read:khimar) has been incorrectly symbolized. There's no difference between covering the legs, arms or hair Islamically. There's nothing symbolic about covering hair specifically just like there isn't anything specifically symbolic about covering one's shoulders or legs.

                            Muslims sadly view the hijab with this weird lens ('symbol of Islam') because of influence from modern kuffar where covering hair is considered odd.
                            You think you know more than my scholar's qiyās? He was more learned than you and all other scholars combined. Yeah, the devil was the greatest scholar too and look where his qiyās of fire being better than tīn got him. Sorry.

                            You follow your scholar's qiyās, and I will follow the Qur'ān and Sunnah.

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                            • #15
                              Trying to think if there was pressure from an early age with my many, many nieces... Alhamdulillaah all of them wear and have always worn hijab. Their mothers are the same. Unthinkable that they wouldn't, tbh. I guess since every single one of their aunts and cousins and sisters do, they don't have issues with it, Alhamdulillaah. Thankfully, they've managed, some of them in areas with very few Muslims at all.

                              Probably between 7-10 years at school, they start to get used to wearing it, or younger, but it isn't strictly done in the beginning.
                              Last edited by Fakhri-bin-Ali; 19-09-21, 04:09 PM.
                              ​​Your du'aa... Always dear, always needed (Jazaa'akumullah Khair.)

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