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How do you take the pain away of someone grieving?

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  • #16
    Re: How do you take the pain away of someone grieving?

    Originally posted by GoogleSlayer View Post
    Maulana Tariq Jameel has changed his view about shias

    if his pro shia stance is a problem for members then it is quite surprising. Because there are lots of members on this forum who have a very moderate view about shias.......but they have issues with maulana
    That's but one issue, there's like a hundred others, but i linked you to that thread so as to keep this one on track.
    "The more you know, the more you realise how little you know. The less you know, the more you think you know." - Abu Mus'ab.
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    • #17
      Re: How do you take the pain away of someone grieving?

      وعليكم السلام

      Lots of cuddles and listening.. It will take time but as long as they know you're there that's all that counts.
      I love you, cherish you and worship you,
      Guide me on your path to your janna,
      Unite me beside you My King and all mighty,


      :love:Allah:love:

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      • #18
        Re: How do you take the pain away of someone grieving?

        talbina. There's sunnah evidence to suggest it's a good thing to give to a grieving person and it's supposed to ease their sorrows somewhat or something like that.

        Other than that, there's the obvious, being there for the person, offering practical help or a listening ear. Practical help can mean that if the deceased helped take care of the person's kids, then you often to do that sometimes or gestures like that. Also don't rush the person or tell them to "get over it", even if it's been several months or over a year. Keep an eye on the person by which I mean it's normal for the first few weeks or months to be in a bit of a daze and operating on autopilot cos' they're still in the grieving process so during that time, let the person vent, cry, break plates or get their feelings out of their system whichever way suits them but after that, don't let them fall into permanent negative patterns of behaviour such as binge eating or that sort of thing.
        The Lyme Disease pandemic: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z5u73ME4sVU

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