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Dr. Farouk El Baz - NASA space scientist... president of the Arab Society for Desert

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  • Arsalan
    replied
    Re: Dr. Farouk El Baz - NASA space scientist... president of the Arab Society for Des

    In britain one of the MOST SENIOR guys in the royal college of surgeons is egyptian muslim , he comes on tv sometimes when things about cariodlogy and heart surgery ( his speciality ) are being discussed.. has a nice beard stubbly beard too

    Leave a comment:


  • Al-Nasser
    replied
    Re: Dr. Farouk El Baz - NASA space scientist... president of the Arab Society for Des

    i like him......he is not fake.......not arrogant....very humble and simple....in Egypt he speak using the accent of the tribal Egyptians which is used in the south....not using English to give the impression "everybody look here...i use english..i am very educated".....nah...he use this accent which is regarded by some Egyptians as the accent of the narrow minded unecuated bedouins.....but he is proud of his roots and his accent

    Leave a comment:


  • Supernova Nebula
    replied
    Originally posted by abdulhakeem
    Dr. Farouk El Baz


    NASA space scientist, Director of the Center for Remote Sensing at Boston University, president of the Arab Society for Desert Research

    December 2004 Volume #25 Issue 12
    By Noha Chakkal

    ASIDE FROM HAVING a spacecraft on Star Trek named after him, Farouk El-Baz’s achievements and awards are numerous. One of the founding fathers of using computer technology to describe geography, he holds a range of awards from NASA, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the government of Egypt, among others.

    El-Baz, who did his undergraduate work at Ain Shams and holds a PhD from the University of Missouri, rose to fame in the scientific community as a geologist with NASA’s space program, interpreting photographs of the moon and choosing landing sites for six Apollo missions. After a stint with the Smithsonian Institute, where he established the Center for Earth and Planetary Studies, and time in the private sector working on the Space Shuttle program, he joined Boston University in 1986 to establish and direct the Center for Remote Sensing, which works with space data and images.

    He continues to be an advisor to NASA, but says his personal research interests lie more in Egypt and the Arab world, studying desert land formation using satellite images.

    Is there a conflict today between science and religion?

    There is absolutely no contradiction between science and religion. A great deal of religion is faith you have faith and you believe, and there is nothing wrong with that. Nothing in religion contradicts the things we learn from science.

    Science changes all the time; there are no constants because our ideas change over time: What is the earth? What’s happening in the universe? The answers change. In all of His books the Torah, the Bible, the Qur’an God emphasizes that He created many wonderful things around us. Our faith whether we’re Christian or Muslim pushes us to learn more about God’s creations because the more we learn, the more we have faith in God’s abilities.

    One of the first groups of astronauts were test pilots for military aircraft; they were very religious people to be able to take such a huge risk. Their faith in God increased tremendously after their first missions because the more we learn, the more we have faith. All these discussions about the contradictions between science and religion are heresy.

    How does it feel, as an Arab and Muslim, to live in post-9/11 America?

    If we say that the people in the West, and in the US specifically, look differently at us or are even afraid of us, I would actually say it’s perfectly normal. Here are people who were hurt, shaken and terrified fear is an acceptable human reaction to the unknown.

    Their interest in learning about us has increased 100-fold. After 9/11, I personally felt distraught by what had happened. Why would a Muslim do something so criminal and inhuman, something from which we cannot possibly gain anything whatsoever?

    I began to hold weekly meetings, first for Muslim and Arab students. Later, Americans came, too. I began to wonder why they had so many misconceptions, why they knew so little about us. The answer is: It’s our fault. For instance, there is not a single [good] translation of the Qur’an [in the United Sates] by someone whose mother tongue is Arabic; no single book in the English-language published in the US [by an Arab author] that actually talks about Islam and its tenets.

    They know nothing about us because we haven’t provided them with the information. We need a whole army of people who know how to speak to the Americans or the British or the Germans in their own language, to explain in public Islam, the Christians of the Middle East, and the difference between Copts and other Christian groups. When someone asks what they can do, I always respond the same way: teach. Reach out to those who will grow up to become the politicians and teachers of tomorrow.

    Is American democracy suitable for the Arab world? Can it be tailored to our traditions and cultural norms?

    I think the present US administration saw something in the fact that the same societies that gave rise to Socialism and Communism then discredited those ideologies and are now moving to [liberal-democratic] capitalism they’re not problems any more.

    Then they look [to the Middle East] and see the future [of conflict] is in all these countries that are ruled by the sword. They think that if they fix the political system here, the whole world will take a turn for the better, that they will then be able to communicate with the rest of the globe and send their products worldwide.

    So they need an example of a nation that embraces democracy and turns out happy, productive citizens with good jobs in a growing economy. Iraq is their example, their test case. The decision was totally naïve.

    The European Union has just grown to include 25 countries with different languages, cultures and ethnic minorities. There are just 22 Arab nations, and we’re united by a single language and only two religions. Can the Arab world become a true power in the global economy in the next 25 years?

    That question makes me shiver. It is incredibly sad, and that’s why I keep saying that my generation failed miserably: We achieved none of our dreams. When we went to study abroad, my generation had four basic objectives: We were going to unite the Arab world, liberate Palestine, eradicate illiteracy, and institute social justice.

    Today, the Arab world is more divided than ever. Palestine is 20 percent of what it used to be in our time, illiteracy has increased in the Arab world in general, and in Egypt in particular, where 60 percent of all women are illiterate.

    Social justice is a disaster and poverty is increasing across the region, even in the Gulf states.

    Part of the problem is that we as individual nations do not trust our neighbors. But if we put these fears away and pull together, nothing will threaten us.

    What about the brain drain in the coming years?

    It is very important to remember that great people came from right here: [Nobel laureate] Ahmed Zuweil, [cardiac surgeon Sir] Magdi Yacoub. They’re as Egyptian as you and me and the people in the street. They were educated in the same schools, ate the same food and they were no greater than anybody they just had the opportunity to excel.

    What we really need is to have faith in the individual and to push each person to perform; do that and they’ll do wonders.

    The problem in the Arab world is management. Managers here think they are the “big boss” who sits and issue directives. Management is part of the problem behind our poor progress in science and technology.

    The best lesson in management that I ever heard was from Jim Webb, who was the director of NASA. He once said that, “If you get from the people working for you only what they think they’re capable of doing, you have failed. Your job is to pave the road for them, to solve their problems so they can accomplish more than they think they’re capable of doing.”

    That’s success in management: Motivate people, give them recognition, congratulate them, push them to do more and be a role model for them.

    What about women in society? In science and technology?

    This is a significant question. We have ignored the role of women in the Arab world in general, let alone in science and technology.

    There is absolutely no difference between men and women in terms of their potential, their minds and their abilities, so why is it that we tie the hands of half of society by not involving them in the production cycle and in innovation?

    Egypt is better off than many Arab countries, although we were even better in a time gone by. We have recognized women for their managerial abilities, and for their contributions and innovations, but we must re-educate ourselves in how to involve women more in education, health and science.

    In my experience, women have more intuition than men, they have a great more intellectual courage than men. And they have more guts: They’re not as afraid of making mistakes as men are.

    What is your advice for young people?

    The critical thing I always tell young people is to acquire knowledge constantly. When you acquire knowledge, your self-confidence increases because you are in the know. So when somebody asks you a question and you answer it with a great deal of confidence because you read the book and thought about it you grow more and more certain of yourself.

    When you answer questions with true knowledge, people tend to respect you. It’s about knowledge, knowledge and more knowledge.

    http://www.egypttoday.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=2265
    Wow...... I'm speechless mashaAllah, everybody must must must read this excellent article.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dr. Farouk El Baz - NASA space scientist... president of the Arab Society for Desert

    Dr. Farouk El Baz


    NASA space scientist, Director of the Center for Remote Sensing at Boston University, president of the Arab Society for Desert Research

    December 2004 Volume #25 Issue 12
    By Noha Chakkal

    ASIDE FROM HAVING a spacecraft on Star Trek named after him, Farouk El-Baz’s achievements and awards are numerous. One of the founding fathers of using computer technology to describe geography, he holds a range of awards from NASA, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the government of Egypt, among others.

    El-Baz, who did his undergraduate work at Ain Shams and holds a PhD from the University of Missouri, rose to fame in the scientific community as a geologist with NASA’s space program, interpreting photographs of the moon and choosing landing sites for six Apollo missions. After a stint with the Smithsonian Institute, where he established the Center for Earth and Planetary Studies, and time in the private sector working on the Space Shuttle program, he joined Boston University in 1986 to establish and direct the Center for Remote Sensing, which works with space data and images.

    He continues to be an advisor to NASA, but says his personal research interests lie more in Egypt and the Arab world, studying desert land formation using satellite images.

    Is there a conflict today between science and religion?

    There is absolutely no contradiction between science and religion. A great deal of religion is faith you have faith and you believe, and there is nothing wrong with that. Nothing in religion contradicts the things we learn from science.

    Science changes all the time; there are no constants because our ideas change over time: What is the earth? What’s happening in the universe? The answers change. In all of His books the Torah, the Bible, the Qur’an God emphasizes that He created many wonderful things around us. Our faith whether we’re Christian or Muslim pushes us to learn more about God’s creations because the more we learn, the more we have faith in God’s abilities.

    One of the first groups of astronauts were test pilots for military aircraft; they were very religious people to be able to take such a huge risk. Their faith in God increased tremendously after their first missions because the more we learn, the more we have faith. All these discussions about the contradictions between science and religion are heresy.

    How does it feel, as an Arab and Muslim, to live in post-9/11 America?

    If we say that the people in the West, and in the US specifically, look differently at us or are even afraid of us, I would actually say it’s perfectly normal. Here are people who were hurt, shaken and terrified fear is an acceptable human reaction to the unknown.

    Their interest in learning about us has increased 100-fold. After 9/11, I personally felt distraught by what had happened. Why would a Muslim do something so criminal and inhuman, something from which we cannot possibly gain anything whatsoever?

    I began to hold weekly meetings, first for Muslim and Arab students. Later, Americans came, too. I began to wonder why they had so many misconceptions, why they knew so little about us. The answer is: It’s our fault. For instance, there is not a single [good] translation of the Qur’an [in the United Sates] by someone whose mother tongue is Arabic; no single book in the English-language published in the US [by an Arab author] that actually talks about Islam and its tenets.

    They know nothing about us because we haven’t provided them with the information. We need a whole army of people who know how to speak to the Americans or the British or the Germans in their own language, to explain in public Islam, the Christians of the Middle East, and the difference between Copts and other Christian groups. When someone asks what they can do, I always respond the same way: teach. Reach out to those who will grow up to become the politicians and teachers of tomorrow.

    Is American democracy suitable for the Arab world? Can it be tailored to our traditions and cultural norms?

    I think the present US administration saw something in the fact that the same societies that gave rise to Socialism and Communism then discredited those ideologies and are now moving to [liberal-democratic] capitalism they’re not problems any more.

    Then they look [to the Middle East] and see the future [of conflict] is in all these countries that are ruled by the sword. They think that if they fix the political system here, the whole world will take a turn for the better, that they will then be able to communicate with the rest of the globe and send their products worldwide.

    So they need an example of a nation that embraces democracy and turns out happy, productive citizens with good jobs in a growing economy. Iraq is their example, their test case. The decision was totally naïve.

    The European Union has just grown to include 25 countries with different languages, cultures and ethnic minorities. There are just 22 Arab nations, and we’re united by a single language and only two religions. Can the Arab world become a true power in the global economy in the next 25 years?

    That question makes me shiver. It is incredibly sad, and that’s why I keep saying that my generation failed miserably: We achieved none of our dreams. When we went to study abroad, my generation had four basic objectives: We were going to unite the Arab world, liberate Palestine, eradicate illiteracy, and institute social justice.

    Today, the Arab world is more divided than ever. Palestine is 20 percent of what it used to be in our time, illiteracy has increased in the Arab world in general, and in Egypt in particular, where 60 percent of all women are illiterate.

    Social justice is a disaster and poverty is increasing across the region, even in the Gulf states.

    Part of the problem is that we as individual nations do not trust our neighbors. But if we put these fears away and pull together, nothing will threaten us.

    What about the brain drain in the coming years?

    It is very important to remember that great people came from right here: [Nobel laureate] Ahmed Zuweil, [cardiac surgeon Sir] Magdi Yacoub. They’re as Egyptian as you and me and the people in the street. They were educated in the same schools, ate the same food and they were no greater than anybody they just had the opportunity to excel.

    What we really need is to have faith in the individual and to push each person to perform; do that and they’ll do wonders.

    The problem in the Arab world is management. Managers here think they are the “big boss” who sits and issue directives. Management is part of the problem behind our poor progress in science and technology.

    The best lesson in management that I ever heard was from Jim Webb, who was the director of NASA. He once said that, “If you get from the people working for you only what they think they’re capable of doing, you have failed. Your job is to pave the road for them, to solve their problems so they can accomplish more than they think they’re capable of doing.”

    That’s success in management: Motivate people, give them recognition, congratulate them, push them to do more and be a role model for them.

    What about women in society? In science and technology?

    This is a significant question. We have ignored the role of women in the Arab world in general, let alone in science and technology.

    There is absolutely no difference between men and women in terms of their potential, their minds and their abilities, so why is it that we tie the hands of half of society by not involving them in the production cycle and in innovation?

    Egypt is better off than many Arab countries, although we were even better in a time gone by. We have recognized women for their managerial abilities, and for their contributions and innovations, but we must re-educate ourselves in how to involve women more in education, health and science.

    In my experience, women have more intuition than men, they have a great more intellectual courage than men. And they have more guts: They’re not as afraid of making mistakes as men are.

    What is your advice for young people?

    The critical thing I always tell young people is to acquire knowledge constantly. When you acquire knowledge, your self-confidence increases because you are in the know. So when somebody asks you a question and you answer it with a great deal of confidence because you read the book and thought about it you grow more and more certain of yourself.

    When you answer questions with true knowledge, people tend to respect you. It’s about knowledge, knowledge and more knowledge.

    http://www.egypttoday.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=2265
    Last edited by abdulhakeem; 25-12-04, 06:49 PM.
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