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The quran has different interpretations. What's the right one?

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  • The quran has different interpretations. What's the right one?

    I always see non Muslims use different interpretations of the Quran in their arguments. How do you know what's the right interpretations of the Quran or sunnah?

  • #2
    The quran has different interpretations. What's the right one?

    The one Rasoolallah :saw: taught to his companions and how they and the next two generations understood it (salaf).
    You think you know more than my scholar's qiyās? He was more learned than you and all other scholars combined. Yeah, the devil was the greatest scholar too and look where his qiyās of fire being better than tīn got him. Sorry.

    You follow your scholar's qiyās, and I will follow the Qur'ān and Sunnah.

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    • #3
      Re: The quran has different interpretations. What's the right one?

      What the prophet said can be interpreted differently too.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by hassan246 View Post
        What the prophet said can be interpreted differently too.
        If then how the sahaba interpreted it.
        You think you know more than my scholar's qiyās? He was more learned than you and all other scholars combined. Yeah, the devil was the greatest scholar too and look where his qiyās of fire being better than tīn got him. Sorry.

        You follow your scholar's qiyās, and I will follow the Qur'ān and Sunnah.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: The quran has different interpretations. What's the right one?

          Originally posted by hassan246 View Post
          I always see non Muslims use different interpretations of the Quran in their arguments. How do you know what's the right interpretations of the Quran or sunnah?
          This is a pretty loaded question to be honest - it depends on what you mean.

          If you mean on issues of ibadaat - then we have a religion with a scholastic tradition that is more than a thousand years old that has been around longer than some random movement that suddenly has popped into existence and centuries after scholars have been working on these issues bypasses and negates all those tens and thousands of scholars who worked for decades at a time to establish a canon of acceptable opinion. In many respect, the ''right interpretation'' just doesn't exist on a lot of issues - instead Sunni Islam over centuries developed a canon of acceptable opinion with multiple authoritative opinions in circulation which still retains a great deal of internal consistency and integrity which is remarkable and exceptional given that we do not have a Pope.

          The fact that a community of scholars over the centuries simply through conversation have managed to create a series of equally authoritative schools of law is unique.

          When it comes to contemporary issues and ethics it becomes a great deal harder because a lot of the challenges we face today are unprecedented. Take for instance the issue of tackling and critiquing the neo-liberal economic framework, enviornmentalism in the context of an industrial age, the ethics of statecraft in the shadow of the nation-state, the challenge of citizenship (to give a few examples). Much of the ethical treatises written in the pre-modern age, reflects the historical and socio-cultural factors of that age. This is because as humans we are all products of the time and place we live in.

          I guess the best thing to do is read history and you will see the fluidity and creativity of our tradition to respond to challenges as they arose - don't believe anyone who says they have all the answers ready made because they live in an ahistorical world devoid of context or common sense.

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