Ads by Muslim Ad Network

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Atkins diet could lower female fertility

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Atkins diet could lower female fertility

    12:59 29 June 04
    Philip Cohen
    NewScientist.com news service

    Women on a high-protein diet, including those following the Atkins regime and some sportswomen, could be significantly reducing their chances of conceiving, a study involving animals suggests.

    It remains to be proven if human fertility is also affected by a protein-rich diet, says David Gardner of the Colorado Center for Reproductive Medicine in Englewood, who led the study. "But to err on the side of caution, I'd suggest women who want to conceive get off a high-protein diet," he says.

    Eating protein-rich food increases levels of a metabolic byproduct, ammonium, in the female reproductive tract of mice and cows, and ammonium is known to slow development of mouse embryos.

    So Gardner and his colleagues wondered if high levels of ammonium would affect normal reproduction.

    "Tons of meat"

    They fed female mice a normal diet of 14% protein, or 25% protein for four weeks before mating. Embryos from females on the high-protein diet implanted only 65% of the time, versus 81% for the normal diet. And only 84% of the high-protein embryos developed to 15 days, compared with 99% of the normal embryos.

    "It's always hard to extrapolate from animals," says Randy Jirtle of the Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, whose team studies the effect of diet on embryos. "But from this data it doesn't look like a good thing for everyone to eat tons and tons of meat."

    However, Jeff Volek from the University of Connecticut says that blood levels of ammonium do not seem to increase in people on the Atkins diet, so levels in the female reproductive tract probably do not either.

    Gardner thinks this should be reassuring for people who adhere to the rules of the diet, but he also points out that many people might eat even higher levels of protein, and the effect of this on ammonium levels is not known.

    The research was presented at the 20th annual meeting of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology in Berlin, Germany.

    http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99996085
    URGENT!!! your help is badly needed - fundraising for marriage

  • #2
    Atkins diet may cut chance of pregnancy, study shows

    Sarah Boseley, health editor, in Berlin
    Tuesday June 29, 2004
    The Guardian

    The high-protein Atkins diet may be damaging the chances of weight-conscious women getting pregnant and having a healthy baby, scientists said yesterday.
    They advised those hoping to conceive to switch to more normal eating patterns.

    Researchers in Colorado revealed at a European fertility conference that embryos from mice that had been fed a high protein diet showed a failure to implant in the womb. They believe the results should be a warning to women who want children.

    "Although our investigations were conducted in mice, our data may have implications for diet and reproduction in humans," said David Gardner, scientific director of the Colorado Centre for Reproductive Medicine in Englewood.

    Some 3m people in the UK and 30m in the US are believed to have tried the controversial Atkins diet, which advocates high meat, fish and egg consumption and severely limited intake of carbohydrates such as bread, rice, pasta and starchy vegetables.

    Animal research has previously shown that the amount of protein in the diet can affect the levels of ammonium in the female reproductive tract of cows and mice.

    Laboratory tests have also demonstrated that ammonium can interfere with the development of mouse embryos. It appears to affect the H19 gene, found on chromosome 7, which is important to growth.

    The Colorado team fed mice a diet which contained a relatively high 25% protein. A con trol group were given a diet which was 14% protein.

    People trying to lose weight on the Atkins diet tend to consume around 35% protein initially, dropping to 25% later, although Atkins representatives say there is no upper limit to the amount of protein that can be consumed.

    "We definitely don't set a limit on how much protein people should eat. It's as much protein as you need to eat until you are full. Protein is quite satisfying so people don't tend to overeat," said a spokeswoman.

    In the study, detailed at the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology conference in Berlin, only a third of the mice (36%) on the high protein diet developed with a normal H19 gene, as opposed to 70% of the control group.

    Of the embryos in the high protein group, only 65% developed into foetuses once they had been transferred to the womb, compared with 81% in the control group.

    "Not only did fewer embryos develop into foetuses when transferred from the high protein group, but of all the embryos that implanted, only 84% developed further, whereas in the control group 99% of the embryos that implanted con tinued to develop," said Dr Gardner.

    By the 15th day of gestation, foetuses from the high protein group were a third of a day behind the control group in their development.

    One foetus had a neural tube defect - damage to that part of the foetus which becomes the spinal cord or brain. In humans the defect most commonly leads to spina bifida.

    "These findings, together with similar work carried out in cows, mean that it would be prudent to advise couples who are trying to conceive, either naturally or via ART [assisted reproduction technology], to ensure that the woman's protein intake is less than 20% of their total energy consumption," said Dr Gardner. "The available data certainly indicate that a high protein diet is not advisable while trying to conceive."

    A spokesman for Atkins Nutritionals Inc cast doubt on the findings. "It is important to note that there was no mention of carbohydrate control in the research conducted by Dr Gardner," he said. "The study subjects were mice, which are herbivores. Whether or not these findings or effects would apply to humans, who are omnivores, is unknown."

    Ben Gocial, a reproductive endocrinologist from Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, speaking on behalf of Atkins, said that controlling carbohydrate consumption had been shown to have a positive effect in women who were trying to conceive and who were over-weight and/or not ovulating properly.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/st...249565,00.html
    URGENT!!! your help is badly needed - fundraising for marriage

    Comment


    • #3
      Atkins diet 'may reduce women's fertility'

      By Maxine Frith, Social Affairs Correspondent in Berlin
      29 June 2004

      The Atkins diet could reduce a woman's chances of becoming pregnant, research published yesterday indicates.

      High-protein diets such as that advocated by the Atkins regime are linked to increased rates of pregnancy failure in the early stages of conception, scientists have found.

      Women who are trying to become pregnant should not adopt protein-rich diets, the experts warned.

      More than three million people in Britain are either on or have tried the low-carbohydrate, high-protein Atkins diet over the past few years.

      The latest research was presented at the annual meeting of the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) in Berlin yesterday.

      Scientists from the Colorado Centre for Reproductive Medicine in the United States fed mice on a diet made up of 25 per cent protein and compared them with mice on a normal diet. Both sets of rodents were then impregnated. The mice on increased protein were found to have a fourfold increase in levels of the chemical ammonium in their reproductive tracts. Ammonium has been linked to problems in mice embryos, such as delayed development and genetic defects.

      The embryos from the high-protein mice had fewer cell numbers and a higher rate of cell death, at a crucial stage in embryonic development, just before the embryo attaches to the inside of the womb. Without implantation, pregnancy cannot occur.

      The early-stage embryos from both sets of mice were implanted into a third group who had been fed a normal-protein diet. Only 65 per cent of those taken from high protein mice developed into a foetus. Embryos from mice on the lower protein diet had an 81 per cent success rate.

      Atkins followers are told to minimise their carbohydrate intake but can eat unlimited amounts of protein, such as meat. While the mice were fed a 25 per cent protein diet, Atkins adherents tend to eat 35 per cent protein during the first induction and weight loss stages of the diet, and are then recommended to remain at 25 per cent for the "maintenance" phase.

      The lead researcher, Dr David Gardner, said: "It is conceivable that people who have protein intakes greater than 30 per cent may have problems conceiving. These findings mean that it would be prudent to advise couples who are trying to conceive, either naturally or through [fertility treatment], to ensure that the woman's protein intake is less than 20 per cent of their total energy consumption. The available data certainly indicate that a high protein diet is not advisable while trying to conceive."

      Dr Stuart Trager, medical director of Atkins Nutritionals, said: "There was no mention of carbohydrate control in the research conducted by Dr Gardner. The study subjects were mice, which are herbivores. Whether or not these findings or effects would apply to humans is unknown."

      http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/hea...p?story=536314
      URGENT!!! your help is badly needed - fundraising for marriage

      Comment


      • #4
        High Protein and Pregnancy

        Air Date: 06/29/2004

        It may help trim the waistline, but a new study suggests the hi-protein low-carb craze may also create a baby. 7Healthcast Reporter Janet Wu explains.

        Cutting carbs may help you on the scale, but it could hurt a woman's chances of getting pregnant.

        Linda Antinoro, Brigham & Womens Nutritionist
        "Fact is, if we're doing some low-cal diets... how does that affect health and fertility, alike?"

        Davida Taylor
        "To me, if you're starving yourself... depriving yourself of nutrients you need."

        A study on mice found animals on a moderately high protein diet produced fewer embryos.

        The high-protein mice ate a diet of 25 percent protein, while the control group received a diet with 14 percent protein.

        Not only did the high-protein mice produce fewer embryos, those embryos were less likely to develop. One possible reason, the extra protein may disrupt genes linked to growth and function.

        Linda Antinoro, Brigham & Womens Nutritionist
        "If somebody's eliminating fruits, vegetables, and grains... host of minerals that they may not be getting."

        The study also found that protein affected levels of a compound in the reproductive tract called ammonium, which could impact embryo development.

        Health experts say that a balanced diet is the best bet when it comes to staying healthy.

        Linda Antinoro, Brigham & Womens Nutritionist
        "A varied diet -- balance, variety, moderation, are still the key players."

        Two things to keep in mind. This is an early animal study. Human studies have not confirmed this link. Also, fertility is a complex matter - with nutrition being just one of many factors.

        http://www1.whdh.com/features/articl...thcast/DBM483/
        URGENT!!! your help is badly needed - fundraising for marriage

        Comment


        • #5
          So diet may be used in the future as a natural means of family planning...
          Please Re-update your Signature

          Comment

          Collapse

          Edit this module to specify a template to display.

          Working...
          X