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New Generation, Will you follow Culture/traditions?

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  • |Sister|
    replied
    Re: New Generation, Will you follow Culture/traditions?

    Originally posted by Massilia View Post
    so technically, and i speak for my tradition i dont know about other, we wore white before the kuffar

    maybe tomorrow couscous will be outlawed before kuffar eat it
    In my culture, white wedding dresses are a christian tradition, so it is my duty to strive against it as a Muslim and make myself different from the kuffar. Rulings differ depending on culture and in a Muslim-majority culture, you follow the other Muslims.

    Leave a comment:


  • Constant Hope
    replied
    Re: New Generation, Will you follow Culture/traditions?

    The 'white wedding dress' was to represent a sign of chastity. Ahem... what 'chastity' most of these kaffir have left, I do wonder

    Leave a comment:


  • Massilia
    replied
    Re: New Generation, Will you follow Culture/traditions?

    Originally posted by nousername View Post
    Is it permissible for a woman to wear a white wedding dress on the wedding night? Or is it haraam because this is the dress of kaafir women?.

    Praise be to Allaah. There is nothing wrong with a woman wearing a white wedding dress on condition that she does not appear in it in front of men who are not her mahrams, because usually wedding dresses are adorned and decorated, and we have already stated in the answer to question no. 39570 that one of the conditions of women’s hijab is that it should not be an adornment in and of itself.
    It is also essential that this dress does not reveal any of the woman’s charms, even if she is only going to appear in front of women in it. See question no. 6569 and 34745.
    With regard to it being the dress of kaafir women, that is not the case. Rather many Muslim women nowadays, if not most of them, wear this kind of dress.
    Shaykh Ibn ‘Uthaymeen was asked:
    What is the ruling on a woman wearing white for her wedding as it is known that this is an imitation of the kuffaar?
    He replied:
    It is permissible for a woman to wear white so long as it is not in the same form as men’s clothing. With regard to it being an imitation of the kuffaar, that is no longer the case, because now all Muslim women wear such clothes when they are getting married. The ruling depends on whether the reason for it is present or not. If it is no longer an imitation of the kuffaar and this has now become something that is common to both Muslims and kaafirs, then the ruling no longer applies, unless something is haraam in and of itself and not because it is an imitation of others. Such things are haraam in all cases.
    Majmoo’at As’ilat tahumm al-Mar’ah, p. 92.

    Islam Q&A

    So it comes down to intentions... as long as I don't think "I wanna look like a christian" than it's fine. It's ubiquitous, like t-shirts.
    it is not even a matter of intention, just reading some clothing history book. The "white dress" is not a kaffir thing since they use it only since Victorian times. For centuries women just wore their nicest dress, in any color


    so technically, and i speak for my tradition i dont know about other, we wore white before the kuffar

    maybe tomorrow couscous will be outlawed before kuffar eat it

    Leave a comment:


  • |Sister|
    replied
    Re: New Generation, Will you follow Culture/traditions?

    ^ :jkk: The above would apply to pants and facial piercings as well, then, right? As long you're not showing awra.

    There is a different opinion listed here: http://www.fatwa.org.au/white-weddin...ing-rings.html
    In the Name of Allah, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful.

    The peculiar white wedding dress and wedding rings are customs of the kuffar. It is not permissible to follow such customs of the kuffar. The hadith says “Whoever resembles a nation is from them.”


    And Allah knows best.

    Darul Ifta Australia

    And a similar opinion saying it should be avoided if one believes it is imitation:
    http://www.islamweb.net/emainpage/in...twaId&Id=87504

    Wearing a white dress at the time of marriage or at any other time is allowed. If one objects believing that it belongs to Christian customs or it is similar to the dress of men then it should be avoided. Originally it was a Christian custom but now it is widespread among Muslims and has became a part of their culture. Hence imitating non-Muslims no longer exists in this practice. The criteria of imitation is that the practice should be a sign and symbol of non-Muslims so that a person merely looking at it considers the person doing it as non-Muslim such as the cap of Jews, the dress of monks and wearing the cross, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • nousername
    replied
    Re: New Generation, Will you follow Culture/traditions?

    Is it permissible for a woman to wear a white wedding dress on the wedding night? Or is it haraam because this is the dress of kaafir women?.

    Praise be to Allaah. There is nothing wrong with a woman wearing a white wedding dress on condition that she does not appear in it in front of men who are not her mahrams, because usually wedding dresses are adorned and decorated, and we have already stated in the answer to question no. 39570 that one of the conditions of women’s hijab is that it should not be an adornment in and of itself.
    It is also essential that this dress does not reveal any of the woman’s charms, even if she is only going to appear in front of women in it. See question no. 6569 and 34745.
    With regard to it being the dress of kaafir women, that is not the case. Rather many Muslim women nowadays, if not most of them, wear this kind of dress.
    Shaykh Ibn ‘Uthaymeen was asked:
    What is the ruling on a woman wearing white for her wedding as it is known that this is an imitation of the kuffaar?
    He replied:
    It is permissible for a woman to wear white so long as it is not in the same form as men’s clothing. With regard to it being an imitation of the kuffaar, that is no longer the case, because now all Muslim women wear such clothes when they are getting married. The ruling depends on whether the reason for it is present or not. If it is no longer an imitation of the kuffaar and this has now become something that is common to both Muslims and kaafirs, then the ruling no longer applies, unless something is haraam in and of itself and not because it is an imitation of others. Such things are haraam in all cases.
    Majmoo’at As’ilat tahumm al-Mar’ah, p. 92.

    Islam Q&A

    So it comes down to intentions... as long as I don't think "I wanna look like a christian" than it's fine. It's ubiquitous, like t-shirts.

    Leave a comment:


  • |Sister|
    replied
    Re: New Generation, Will you follow Culture/traditions?

    White dresses are copying the kuffar. Which is why I refuse to use one and why I won't let my daughters use them either.

    White wedding gowns are a relatively recent phenomenon, before which almost any colour dress was acceptable, including black if the intended bridegroom was a widower. In early Celtic cultures, red was the bridal colour of choice, worn to invoke fertility; early Christians preferred blue, which was symbolic of truth and purity and used in depictions of the Virgin Mary, either for the whole dress or as a band around the hem. Right up until the late 19th century, most ordinary women were married in their ‘Sunday best’, which, adapted if necessary, could be worn again. Grey was much favoured as both modest and useful, and brown was not uncommon; white was usually just too impractical.

    The white wedding dress as we recognise it today is a tradition started by Queen Victoria, who wore white to her own wedding to Albert of Saxe-Coburg in 1840. But white wedding gowns, worn as a token of the bride’s purity and innocence, were worn by royalty and the wealthy long before then: Henry IV of England’s daughter, Princess Philippa, is reported to have worn a tunic and mantle of white satin, edged with velvet and ermine, at her marriage to Eric of Pomerania (modern Scandinavia) in 1406; Anne of Brittany, daughter of Francis II, Duke of Brittany, wore white at her third marriage in 1499 to Louis XII of France; while in 1572, Margaret of Valois is said to have married Henry of Navarre in a dress trimmed with white ermine, topped with a blue coat with a 1.5m (5ft) train. Mary, Queen of Scots wore white for her wedding with the Dauphin of France in 1558, flouting the French custom that white was only to be worn in mourning for French royalty. (Ironically, her husband died two years later.)

    The bride’s wedding veil has several different associations. It may have evolved as a symbolic protection from malign spirits, in particular the Evil Eye. It also implies a bride’s submission to her future husband, the man to whom she allows the privilege of lifting the veil. It has also been seen as a representation or development of the Anglo-Saxon ‘care cloth’ that was held over the heads of both bride and groom. The Saxon cloth was itself related to the Jewish chuppah, a square vestment held over the heads of the couple, and to the linen canopy that is traditionally used in Catholic wedding ceremonies.

    Flowers carried and worn are bridal essentials. A floral crown was once de rigeur for both bride and groom. The blooms were carefully chosen for their meanings – orange blossoms for fecundity and roses for love, and combined with herbs: rosemary for remembrance and sage for wisdom; garlic would be added to ward off evil spirits. The crowning of the bride with a coronet of gold or silver, sometimes entwined with flowers, is still observed in Eastern Orthodox weddings. The buttonhole worn by the groom is the remnant of his crown and also dates back to the custom of a knight wearing the colours of his lady to signify his love. http://www.readersdigest.com.au/white-wedding-dress

    During the medieval and renaissance periods, wedding dresses were basically just more elaborate versions of contemporary styles, displaying a wealth of intricate embroidery, beading, expensive fabrics, and dyes. The white wedding dress as we recognize it today is actually a tradition started by Queen Victoria who wore white to her own wedding. In fact, up until the late 19th century, brides wore just about any color for their wedding gown, including black if the intended bridegroom was a widower. For example, in early Celtic cultures, red was the bridal color of choice, worn to invoke fertility, as evident in Elizabethan silk weaver turned balladeer Thomas Deloney's description of a German bride's attire as a "gowne of sheepes russet, and a kirtle of fine worsted."

    Although many peasant brides of the 13th and 14th centuries wore gowns dyed with woad (a herb of the mustard family which produced a vibrant but easily-faded blue dye), green was also a popular wedding gown color, as shown by Madame Arnolfi in Jan Van Eyck's Wedding Portrait, painted in 1434. http://www.renaissancemagazine.com/b...wedcustom.html

    Leave a comment:


  • snow_flakes
    replied
    Re: New Generation, Will you follow Culture/traditions?

    Originally posted by Kas1m View Post
    Either you are in it all the way or you are not. That might not make sense but read it like four times.
    Brother its not immitating to wear white dress...immitating is when the dress is not covering fully...or religious dress code resemblance...e.g we can not wear the cap like that of pope...or the stick he carries...

    Leave a comment:


  • nonameakhi
    replied
    Re: New Generation, Will you follow Culture/traditions?

    generally speaking it depends what people mean by culture and traditions. I mean I realise the topic has gone into things like weddings etc but I also think madhabs we follow etc can be tradition and culture

    I odnt want another madhab debate but Ihave seen people stick to their ''side'' regardless of what is presented and that shows that in the end tradition and culture will win for most

    Leave a comment:


  • nonameakhi
    replied
    Re: New Generation, Will you follow Culture/traditions?

    Originally posted by nousername View Post
    Sorry, it's Monday and I've read it..are you saying we can't filter out the bad?
    without trying to label here, things like wedding rings white dresses etc are a copy of what?

    I think that's what the brother means. we leave it all as it is bad

    Leave a comment:


  • nousername
    replied
    Re: New Generation, Will you follow Culture/traditions?

    Originally posted by Kas1m View Post
    Either you are in it all the way or you are not. That might not make sense but read it like four times.
    Sorry, it's Monday and I've read it..are you saying we can't filter out the bad?

    Leave a comment:


  • Kas1m
    replied
    Re: New Generation, Will you follow Culture/traditions?

    Originally posted by nousername View Post
    I will keep the good: like I love my white wedding dress, our foods, my time orientation, etc but leave the haram like dating.
    Either you are in it all the way or you are not. That might not make sense but read it like four times.

    Leave a comment:


  • nousername
    replied
    Re: New Generation, Will you follow Culture/traditions?

    I will keep the good: like I love my white wedding dress, our foods, my time orientation, etc but leave the haram like dating.

    Leave a comment:


  • iRepIslam
    replied
    Re: New Generation, Will you follow Culture/traditions?

    ofcourse.. if it doesnt go against islam

    food and clothing i will keep. i will pick and choose actually.

    Leave a comment:


  • Massilia
    replied
    Re: New Generation, Will you follow Culture/traditions?

    Originally posted by Maghrebia00 View Post

    Oh days! the haik does look good... and sarouels are so cute!
    You go girl! Bring them back!
    for sisters only : here is the haik, it is coming back in force in Algeria http://www.babeddart.com/article-moi...s-de-mars-1427
    http://www.reporters.dz/belaredj-moi...les-dehors/426

    Leave a comment:


  • Maghrebia00
    replied
    Re: New Generation, Will you follow Culture/traditions?

    Originally posted by |Sister| View Post
    I can't think of many things from my culture that aren't already haraam, not off the top of my head anyway.

    Things like having a "white wedding in a chapel", getting something "old new borrowed and blue" for good luck, avoiding walking under ladders or passing black cats, ect. These are already haraam anyway.

    I guess we have some family traditions which I think are pretty stupid, but I've always refused to do them even when I was nonmuslim, so I don't think they count either. Ex: Putting your elbows off the table, eating with the correct utensil, ect. I just began sitting on the floor and eating with my hands. You don't need a knife and fork to eat pizza and burritos lol.

    Most american traditions are tied to christianity so by default are haraam to practice. Some newer non-christian traditions are haraam anyway like kissing a stranger on new year's eve, being weird if you don't have a bf/gf by the sixth grade, weekend/tailgate/sports parties, hazing into clubs and beer pong, celebrating (even nominally) halloween/groundhogs day/valentines day/st patricks day. These are all social things that are "expected" of you if you want to fit in.

    Another tradition that I reject is living your "own life" in a nuclear family and not taking care of your parents anymore. The reason my mom doesn't want me to move out is because she "knows" (thinks) that once I go I'm gone forever and she will never receive help or friendship from me again, because this is the tradition in the culture we're from specifically (yes the usa has many cultures depending on the area you're in). I'm having a hard time convincing her that I don't believe in nuclear family, that i'm an extended-family person and I'd never abandon her or cut off contact, but she doesn't believe me because her other kids followed this tradition so she thinks I will as well, and so is fighting me tooth and nail. If I tell her she is being annoying about something, she always says things like "well you'll abandon me one day and won't have to worry about it".

    It's really hard to break tradition and even harder to convince your family that you really do mean it and you really won't follow those traditions. They're just like "yeah yeah you're just saying that" or "don't you dare even think about it you traitor". My cousin's dad beat him up because he said football was stupid lol. They treat it like a religion.

    * I didn't even include the racist traditions but they are just too ignorant to mention. And american racism isn't similar asian racism. It's not about tribes, it's purely skin color. I have cousins of varying race, but one white cousin has a very young daughter. When she was born he got into an arguement with me about arabs. I said I don't care what color my husband is as long as he's a good person. He told me that humans are like dogs and should keep our breeds pure, and that mixed mutts should be exterminated/arrested. And if he ever caught his daughter with an "impure" colored man, he'd have to kill them both. That is why I think americans who point out and mock asian honor killings are being super hypocritical. There are tons of racist americans who do the same thing.
    Oh! That was interesting. OFCOURSE! you can't eat pizza with knife and fork. It kills the cheese moment, you need to choke on the stretchy cheese. That is the only way to eat a pizza.

    Oh my days, so many rules. and poor child for disliking football.

    :(

    Originally posted by Constant Hope View Post
    I'm from a south Asian background, so I totally see the crap that goes on. Truthfully, I think educating and making our children much, much more mature from a younger age is the way to go about things. My parents were like kids having kids. My mum was 17 when she married, so had zilch life experience to that point I guess of the real world knocks. My father, he KNEW what responsibility should be, cause he was driving trucks at the age of 11 for my grandfathers brick factory in Azad Kashmir to all over Pakistan. When he got here, he started to work, but I noticed he had a very mean, greedy streak due to his culture and he didn't offer my mother any money or look after her properly like Islam teaches him to. Disgustingly patriarchal from a cultural PoV.

    So, I suppose the goals making your children stalwart with deen and not babying them. As soon as my kid turns 12 i'm going to tell him to start earning money to pay for the things he wants and especially to start saving for his marriage. I'm going to basically have him save away his own tax free ISA the governments give them.

    Inshallah, i'll be doing a lot of things differently, but at the same time, I understand people will never shed their culture entirely. So, weddings with a lot of people that cost a bit are still going to be around. I'm just going to make sure my children have a proper grasp on what it means to marry in a budget of what you can afford. Inshallah by the time they're 18, maybe 16 even they'll have the money and maturity to marry if they choose to do so, and they'll balance all the responsibilities.

    I'd like to think, that as one generation takes the hard knocks, the other ones get taught how to avoid them and prosper Inshallah. It's why I don't like the 'leave them' attitude some take towards our less practicing brothers and sisters as if they're a helpless cause. Just like the widows, if we don't as men or women take those who Inshallah do wish to change and slowly do it, you're going to see a continuing divide on how practicing some are and most aren't because they're not taught much better.
    That is abit extreme about a 12 year old making money...
    that reminded me of something i read.
    http://business.time.com/2013/03/29/...or-30-million/

    Originally posted by Massilia View Post
    apart from the rubbish linked to female virginity and some superstitions, i can follow the rest. Especially for the clothing. I am like even getting fashionly patriot against my own kin from ME and their clothing.
    I want my haik and sarouels back in track!!!
    Oh days! the haik does look good... and sarouels are so cute!
    You go girl! Bring them back!
    Originally posted by F_R View Post
    I'm not waiting.
    lol... idk why that comment made me laugh but LOL!

    Leave a comment:

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