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what are the Alawite's beliefs??

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  • what are the Alawite's beliefs??

    what are the Alawite's beliefs??

    i heard that the are a very deviant sect of an already deviant sect (Shiite) but do they believe in who do they worship and what can cause them to commit such atrocities to our Syrian bros and sis can someone please elaborate?

  • #2
    Re: what are the Alawite's beliefs??

    you just made me google their belief, this came up on sheikh wiki,

    "Alevis believe in the unity of Allah, Muhammad, and Ali, but this is not a trinity composed of God and the historical figures of Muhammad and Ali. Rather, Muhammad and Ali are representations of divine energies, the first of which is Allah.
    In Alevi writings there are many references to the unity of Muhammad and Ali, such as: #I am not posting what it said, for such an act i would class it as heresy# "
    And he is the son of Ithel Goch ap Cynwrig ap Iorwerth Ddu ap Cynwrig Ddewis Herod ap Cywryd!

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    • #3
      Re: what are the Alawite's beliefs??

      I suggest a good google, it turned up such stuff as this:

      Alawite doctrines have not been written down, but rather they are handed down as secrets by the religious leaders. The Alawite faith is a secret religion even today. Alawites do not have mosques, only devotional rooms. They disapprove of the Islamic religious duties (praying five times, fasting during Ramadan etc), but under persecution they sometimes practise them to protect themselves.

      Whether this is true or not I don't know, source:
      http://www.30-days.net/muslims/musli...yria-alawites/

      Wiki says:
      Alawis are self-described Shia Muslims, and have been called Shia by other sources[10][11] including the influential Lebanese Shia cleric Musa al-Sadr of Lebanon.[42] The Alawis get their beliefs from the Prophets of Islam, from the Quran, and from the books of the Imams from the Ahlulbayt such as the Nahj al-Balagha by Ali ibn Abu Talib.[citation needed] At least one source has compared them to Baha'is, Babis, Bektashis, Ahmadis, and "similar groups that have arisen within the Muslim community".[49] However, the prominent Sunni Grand Mufti of Jerusalem Mohammad Amin al-Husayni issued a fatwah recognizing them as part of the Muslim community in the interest of Arab nationalism.[50][51] Sunni scholars such as Ibn Kathir, on the other hand, have categorized Alawis as pagans in their religious works and documents.

      HETERODOX

      Many of the tenets of the faith are secret and known only to a select few Alawi.[23][52] According to some sources, Alawis have integrated doctrines from other religions (syncretism), in particular from Ismaili Islam and Christianity.[9][23][43] Alawites are reported to celebrate certain Christian festivals, "in their own way",[43] including Christmas, Easter, and Palm Sunday, which make use of bread and wine.[33]
      According to author Theo Padnos, who lived in Syria from 2007 to 2010, the Alawi religion evolved during the years under Hafez Al Assad's rule, so that Alawites became not Shia, but effectively Sunni. Public manifestation or "even mentioning of any Alawite religious activities" was banned, as was any Alawite religious organizations or "any formation of a unified religious council" or a higher Alawite religious authority. "Sunni-style" mosques were built in every Alawite village, and Alawi were encouraged to perform Hajj.[53]
      [edit]

      Orthodox

      Some sources have suggested that the non-Muslim nature of many of the historical Alawi beliefs notwithstanding, Alawi beliefs may have changed in recent decades. In the early 1970s a booklet entitled "al-`Alawiyyun Shi'atu Ahl al-Bait" ("The Alawis are Followers of the Household of the Prophet"), was issued in which doctrines of the Imami Shi'ah were described as 'Alawi, and which was "signed by of numerous `Alawi` men of religion".[54]
      A scholar suggests that factors such as the high profile of Alawi in Syria, the strong aversion of the Muslim majority to apostasy, and the relative lack of importance of religious doctrine to Alawi identity may have induced Syrian leader Hafez al-Assad and his successor son to press their fellow Alawi "to behave like 'regular Muslims', shedding or at least concealing their distinctive aspects".[55]

      Alawis have their own scholars, referred to as shaikhs, although more recently there has been a movement to bring Alawism and the other branches of Twelver Islam together through educational exchange programs in Syria and Qumm.[56]
      Some sources have talked about "sunnification" of Alawites under Baathist Syrian leader and Alawite Hafiz al-Asad.[57] Joshua Landis, Director of the Center for Middle East Studies, writes that Hafiz al-Assad "tried to turn Alawites into 'good' (read Sunnified) Muslims in exchange for preserving a modicum of secularism and tolerance in society." While al-Asad "declared the Alawites to be nothing but Twelver Shiites", he "set the example for his people by adhering to Sunni practice. He built mosques in Alawite towns, prayed publicly and fasted and encouraged his people to do the same."[57] In a paper on "Islamic Education in Syria", Landis wrote that "no mention" is made in Syrian textbooks controlled by the Al Assad regime, of Alawites, Druze, and Ismailis or even Shi`a Islam. "Islam is presented as a monolithic religion and Sunni Islam is it."[58] Ali Sulayman al-Ahmad, chief judge of the Baathist Syrian state, has stated: “We are Alawi Muslims. Our book is the Quran. Our prophet is Muhammad. The Ka`ba is our qibla, and our religion is Islam.”[59]



      Make of it what you will, it is hard to see them as inside the fold of Islam but Allah (swt) knows best.

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      • #4
        Re: what are the Alawite's beliefs??

        The Nusayriyyah, who were named after Muhammad Ibn Numayr an-Nusayree (d.270H), refer to themselves as 'Alawiyyah after Alee Ibn Abee Taalib. Shaykhul-Islaam Ibn Taymiyyah said in Majmoo'ul-Fataawaa (35/145) in explanation of their deviance:

        "These people named 'an-Nusayriyyah,' and other groups from among the Qaraamitah and Baatiniyyah, are greater disbelievers than the Jews and Christians. Rather, they are greater disbelievers than most of the mushrikeen (idolaters), and their harm to the Ummah of Muhammad (saw), is greater than the harm of the disbelievers who are in war with Muslims, such as at-Tatar, disbelieving Europeans and others. For they present themselves in front of ignorant Muslims as supporters and advocates of the Family of the Prophet, while in reality they do not believe in Allaah, nor the Messenger, nor the Book, nor commands, nor prohibitions, nor reward, nor punishment, nor Paradise, nor the Fire, nor in one of the Messengers before Muhammad (saw), nor in a religion from among previous religions. Rather, they take the words of Allaah and His Messenger, known to the Scholars of Muslims, and they interpret them based upon their fabrications, claiming that their interpretations are 'hidden knowledge' ('ilmul-baatin).

        They have no limit in their unbelief with regards to Allaah's Name, His verses, and their distortion of the Speech of Allaah, the Most High, and His Messenger from their proper places. Their aim is repudiation of Islaamic beliefs and laws in every possible way, trying to make it appear that these matters have realities that they know, such as that 'five Prayers' means knowledge of their secrets, 'obligatory fast' hiding of their secrets, and 'pilgrimage to the Ancient House' means a visit to their shaykhs, and that the two hands of Aboo Lahab represent Aboo Bakr and 'Umar, and that 'the great news and the manifest imaam' (an-naba'ul 'adtheem walimaamul-mubeen) is 'Alee Ibn Abee Taalib. There are well known incidents and books they have written with regards to their enmity to Islaam and its people. When they have an opportunity, they spill the blood of Muslims, such as when they once killed pilgrims and threw them into the well of Zamzam.

        Once they took the black stone and it stayed with them for a period of time, and they have killed so many Muslim scholars and elders that only Allaah knows their number. Muslim scholars have written books, unveiling their secrets, exposing their veils, explaining what they are upon from disbelief, infidelity and atheism, by which they are greater disbelievers than the Jews, Christians, and Indian idol-worshipping Brahmans. It is known to us, that the coast of Shaam was only taken over by the Christians from their side. And also that they are always upon the side of every enemy against Muslims, so they are with Christians against Muslims. From the greatest afflictions that have befallen them are Muslims' opening conquest of the coast (of Shaam) and defeat of the Christians. Rather, one of the greatest afflictions that has befallen them is Muslims' victory over Tatar, and from the greatest holidays for them is the Christians conquest - and refuge is sought with Allaah the Exalted- of Muslim ports. They do not admit that this world has a Creator that created it, or that He has a Religion that He orders with, or that He has a place with which He will reward people for their deeds, other than this place (in this world).

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        • #5
          Re: what are the Alawite's beliefs??

          :jkk:

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