Ads by Muslim Ad Network

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Food Database: How chocolate can ward off cancer

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Food Database: How chocolate can ward off cancer

    HELEN PUTTICK, Health Correspondent
    March 19 2004

    CHOCOLATE muffins and Scotch pies could help ward off cancer, according to the first guide of its type in the world.

    Burgers, biscuits, and knickerbocker glories are also among foods normally labelled bad for your health which achieve positive scores on the database, designed to help people protect themselves against the killer disease.

    Dr Margaret Ritchie, of St Andrews University, launched the internet-based index yesterday after four years of research breaking down the chemical components of food. The finished chart details levels of natural compounds called phyto-oestrogens in 8000 different foods.

    Studies have shown teenage girls and young women who consume relatively high levels of phyto-oestrogens are far less likely to develop aggressive forms of breast cancer in middle age. Links have also been drawn between lower risk of prostate cancer in men and reduction in the severity of cancer in women who have already been diagnosed.

    Dr Ritchie said: "In Indonesia, they can consume up to 200mg of phyto-oestrogens a day and they have the lowest rates of breast and prostate cancer in the world."

    With a view to enabling further research on the link and providing consumers with better information, Dr Ritchie set out to create an official list of the phyto-oestrogen content of foodstuffs.
    As well as using existing research, her mission involved contacting supermarkets across the country for information and carrying out intricate chemical analysis of products, ranging from Yorkshire pudding to abalone.

    She then double-checked her mathematics by recruiting 14 volunteers to record everything they ate during a day, keeping duplicates of every item. Dr Ritchie worked out how much phyto-oestrogen each individual had consumed based on her database and then homogenised the duplicate products so she could analyse the total phyto-oestrogen content and verify her database was right.

    The work produced some surprising findings. Choc ices contain 85 micrograms of phyto-oestrogens per 100g, jam doughnuts 200mcg per 100g and grilled beef sausages 580mcg per 100g.

    However, it is wholemeal bread, soya, and raisins which are among the real winners, and their high phyto-oestrogen content pushes up the scores for products which contain them. Dr Ritchie said the use of soya in foods like Scotch pies and Cornish pasties explained their high scores.

    While she recommended trying to boost cancer protection by eating healthier meals such as wholemeal humus rolls and wholemeal rice with tofu, she also said: "It is rather nice that someone can say I have had a Scotch pie and there is something in it that is good for me."

    She hopes people with a family history of cancer will use the database to guide their food choices, recommending consumption of 20-40mg of phyto-oestrogens a day, but advising studies show as little as 5mg can make a difference.

    Dr Ritchie said: "If you say to people 'start changing your bread to wholemeal, start using more plant foods in sandwich fillings', then you are probably taking amounts which could be protective."

    Dr Catherine Hankey, lecturer in nutrition at Glasgow University, said of the database: "It is really a research tool rather than something that can be used by the public. I do not think there is enough understanding . . . the public struggle with nutritional labelling at the moment."

    Ian Young, development consultant of Europe for Health Scotland, the health education agency, also warned the public on how they used it.

    He said: "Foods like soya are obviously very high in this compound, but there are different ways you can get your soya."

    He added that people had to consider what else foods contained before selecting them for their phyto-oestrogen properties, saying: "You get nice things like mung beans which are high in the compound. You could produce a nice vegetarian curry."

    Dr Tim Key, of Cancer Research UK, warned that the power of phyto-oestrogens to reduce the risk of developing some types of cancer had not been proven.

    However, he called it "an interesting hypothesis."

    http://www.theherald.co.uk/news/12291.html
    URGENT!!! your help is badly needed - fundraising for marriage

  • #2
    Scientists' anti-cancer recipes

    Last Updated: Friday, 19 March, 2004, 07:13 GMT

    A special website carrying anti-cancer recipes has been created by scientists at a Scottish university in a bid to cut cancer risks among teenagers.

    The alphabetical database was created by Dr Margaret Ritchie from the School of Biology at St Andrews University.

    It highlights foods that contain natural compounds known as phyto-oestrogens, which exist in wholemeal bread, soya, yoghurt and some fruits.

    It aims to protect youngsters from developing breast and prostate cancer.

    The database has been used in the University of Edinburgh's prostate cancer study and will be used in Scotland's largest breast cancer study undertaken by the University of Aberdeen.

    'Cancer protection'

    That study will specifically look at young women who tend to develop the most aggressive strain of the disease.

    Dr Ritchie said: "Put simply, we're pinpointing foods which you can introduce to your diet - or that of your teenage son or daughter - so they can build up cancer protection in later life."

    The database is the result of three years work, based on intricate biology, chemistry and maths.

    Studies in the past have shown that teenagers and young adults who consume relatively high levels (between 300 and 1500 micrograms per 100g) of phyto-oestrogens are far less likely to develop aggressive forms of breast cancer when they reach middle age.

    Likewise, the compounds, which only exist in plants and vegetables, may also provide young men with protection against prostate cancer.

    Dr Ritchie said: "It appears that they prevent the development of cells in the breast that are likely to become cancerous in later life.

    "We have yet to establish the exact mechanism involved, but it seems clear that we are dealing with a very important class of compounds, one which is going to become increasingly important to our diets in coming years."

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/scotland/3525348.stm
    URGENT!!! your help is badly needed - fundraising for marriage

    Comment


    • #3
      great excuse to eat more choc bars

      you can access/download the database here after being provided with a password from the author:

      Margaret Ritchie: Phyto-oestrogen database
      URGENT!!! your help is badly needed - fundraising for marriage

      Comment


      • #4
        wow, i can go buy a whole bunch of chocolate, can't wait to see my husbands face when i tell him.. "just trying to prevent cancer, thought i would stock up on some chocolate pie, bars, ice cream, hot chocolate, fudge, cookies....." lol, who would have thought, :p


        by the way, what in the world are knickerbocker glories ?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Jaserah
          wow, i can go buy a whole bunch of chocolate, can't wait to see my husbands face when i tell him.. "just trying to prevent cancer, thought i would stock up on some chocolate pie, bars, ice cream, hot chocolate, fudge, cookies....." lol, who would have thought, :p


          by the way, what in the world are knickerbocker glories ?
          its an ice cream...i think its like the biggest icecream u can get, basically....they put it in a glass n shove in as much chocolate n whatever as poss :p something like that :p
          <button id="tw_schedule_btn" class="tw-schedule-btn" style="padding: 4px 6px;position: absolute;left: 141px;top: 840px;background-color: #F7F7F7; background: linear-gradient(#FFF, #F0F0F0); border: 1px solid #CCC; color: #5F5F5F; cursor: pointer; font-weight: bold; text-shadow: 0 1px #FFF; white-space: nowrap;border-radius: 3px;font-size: 11px; display: none; z-index: 8675309">Schedule</button>

          Comment


          • #6
            wow, sounds yummy. :D

            Comment

            Collapse

            Edit this module to specify a template to display.

            Working...
            X