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Exzema

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  • Exzema

    This is a rather common, non-contagious skin condition characterized by reddening, rash-like blotchiness, sometimes cracking, weeping and crusting and bleeding of the skin. It's usually accompanied by fiery itching that can be near impossible to resist scratching, and scratching often makes the condition worse and leads to damage the affected area.

    It can affect different people at different times of their lives, in different areas of their body, at differing severities. Some don't get it that badly and not for too long, some have it on-going, some have it covering large areas of their body and are affected by it badly, even left with massive scars. Although there are some suggested causes such as stress, diet and contact with irritating substances such as clothes washed with the wrong washing powder (and thus removing these things can sometimes clear it up), sometimes it can appear and disappear with no apparent cause.

    Doctors are still baffled to this day as to the exact cause of it and there is no known cure, only treatments that reduce the severity of the symptoms. Different treatments work for different people, what works for one person may not necessarily work for another.

    I thought we could perhaps share some treatments we've found here, as some sufferers are always looking for a better treatment (some haven't found anything that works yet).

    I remember being prescribed something... P something, some number of whatever. It BURNED and only made me want to itch it more. I couldn't actually stand it. I had to wash it off and apply sudocreme, which cooled the burning instantly.

    I found sudocreme cools the itching and stinging, and it helped to stop the itching which ultimately helped the excema go away at the affected site. But now it's come back elsewhere, and the sudocreme doesn't really work any more.

    Currently trying a different cream (all natural ingredients, plant oils and extracts) that my grandma thinks works wonders. I'll report back with how it goes.

  • #2
    Re: Exzema

    my son had eczema up until he was about 18 months...he was prescribed soooo many things from emolients (diprobase, cetraben) to steriod creams (hydrocortisone) to that all round antibiotic/antifungal cream (Trimovate). and of course the usual oilatum bath products

    in the end he just suddenly grew out of it alhamdulillah.

    i've heard of people apply mashed banana to their eczema (for the potassium) and a popular home treatment is to apply aloe vera directly from the plant (my father does this when he has a flare up and it works a treat mashallah).

    inshallah you find relief from your new natural cream :)

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    • #3
      Re: Exzema

      Sometimes it can be related to diet, so maybe it is worth keeping a detailed food diary for a couple of weeks and chating next to it when the eczema flares up.

      Also make sure you get loads of oil in your diet, fish, dried fruits, or tke an oil or evening primrose supplment. Keep the skin hydrated at all times, even if it means moistursing several tilmes a day!!

      Keep your home humidified as well, this can be easily done by placing a bowl of water in each room near the radiators or even wet flannels/ towels on them to help put some moisture back into the air. also maybe keep a window open, even just a crack all day/ night long to help the house from getting too dry/ hot (esp. in winter!)

      Use gloves when using any cleaning liquids/ washing up and maybe check that your washing up powders/ liquids are suitable for sensitive skin ie: non bio instead of bio.

      Natural stuff you can use to relieve itching is aloe vera (very effective), cucumbers, cold flannels, basically you want to cool the area down to prevent you from itching and scratching (and keep your nails short so you are less likely to break the skin and bleed and spread infection) Check what soap/ shampooo you use, change to milder/ baby ones if you can (no scent/ perfumes ones)
      What does 'freedom' mean?

      Does the eagle want to swim in the sea,
      Restricted by the sky?

      Does the fish want to dance on the wind,
      Not enough river to explore?

      Yet the sky is freedom for the bird
      but death for the fish,

      The sea is wide for the fish
      but will engulf the bird.

      We ask for freedom but freedom to do what?
      We can only express our nature as it was created.

      The prayer mat of the earth is freedom,
      freedom from slavery to other than the One,
      Who offers an shoreless ocean of love to swim in
      and a horizon that extends to the next life,
      Yet we chose the prison and call it freedom.

      “All our handling of the child will bear fruit, not only at the moment, but in the adult they are destined to become.” Donate today! http://campaign.justgiving.com/chari...iyahschool2015

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      • #4
        Re: Exzema

        i use eumovate and its very effective and well known around pharmacies here aswell :)

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        • #5
          Re: Exzema

          exzema is dermatitis but not dangerous and it have simple treatment.. it should be not effected from bacteries...
          maybe the patient should wear cotton clothing etc..and not use soap on skin for cleaning ..but should use oil soap for cleaning and need some moisturizer for skin :)
          Last edited by RoseCandle; 05-03-11, 08:32 AM.

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          • #6
            Re: Exzema

            I had severe excema when I was young and it seemed to disappear. I started working in fast food more than a year ago when it developed on my hands. We have to wash our hands every time before putting on plastic gloves to handle food, and in order for the gloves to slide on your hands faster, the hands need to be slightly wet. Ergo, your hands just soak in water for long periods of time. I just got off a 9-hour shift from my job and my hands are all dry and cracking. I don't even have fingerprints anymore.

            I'm on a really powerful medication from my dermatologist, but I've been using it for more than a year and I'm afraid that if I keep using it, my body will become immune to the effects of the medicine and my excema condition will spiral out of control.
            Dreams feel real while we're in them. It's only when we wake up do we realize something was actually strange.

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            • #7
              Re: Exzema

              just like wolfn i get the same thing when washing my hands to much. the same thing happens if im dehydrated or in cold weather. i have dark patches on the back of my hands from where it happened last time. they take time to fade.
              glass half empty

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              • #8
                Re: Exzema

                I mentioned in a few posts before that you can try shea butter. You can buy natural shea butter in slabs from the internet. Google search it. Worked wonders for my neice.

                Try it.


                Visit: www.muslim-mums.co.uk

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                • #9
                  Re: Exzema

                  try going to a good dermatologist, I had bad eczema for years until I did. The cause of eczema is known nowadays, it's a defect in the skin's barrier which causes it to get washed away easily. This then leaves the skin open to drying and to allergens, causing the eczema. The key to its treatment is in having a good emollient cream, these creams contain no drugs but they contain oils that replace and rebuild the skin's barrier. Steroid creams can calm acute irritation/redness and itching, but they are only curing the symptoms not the cause and should only be a short term treatment. Long term treatment should be with a good emollient. In my experience, unguentum mearc or cetaphil emollient creams are very effective, but most of them all they do is moisturise, they don't help build and maintain the skin's protective layer. Doctors generally over prescribe steriod creams and don't understand the necessity for a good emollient. Sudocreme is a nappy rash cream, it may work on very mild cases of eczema but it's not good for severe cases. Also, some very severe cases the skin can get infected, in such cases a combined antibiotic and steriod cream such as fucibet should be used, but again this is just a short term thing to calm the infection and irritation, it should be combined with a decent emollient so that the skin barrier can build itself up again, so that once the infection and irritation has gone down, the steriod/antibiotic cream is stopped, but the emollient cream is continued. Depending on teh severity of the eczema, the emollient cream may be needed for life, BUT it contains no drugs, it's only a combination of oils so there are no long term side effects. Less severe cases once the skin barrier is strong again the emollient can be stopped.

                  Also there are some important issues regarding the management of eczema:

                  1. some people with eczema shouldn't wash too often as plain water removes the skin's barrier - if this is the case and the eczema is on parts of the body that are washed in wudu - they shouldn't do wudu, and should do tayammun (dry ablution) instead - this is one important reason to see a good dermatologist, who can advise you whether it's safe for you to do wudu or not (in the Qur'an it says that the sick person is excused from wudu - scholars clarify this saying that if an existing illness will be made worse or the recovery delayed by doing wudu, then tayammun should be done instead - this applies for this kind of eczema as washing 5x a day will make it worse) - in addition to the wudu issue, the dermatologist should advise on how often it's safe to wash the affected parts of the body

                  2. always use cleansing products that are designed for eczema or extremely sensitive skin, avoid anything alkaline like the plague it will eat away your skin's barrier just like that.

                  3. pat your skin dry, don't rub it with a towel, you can rub away the skin's barrier

                  4. be careful of detergents and fabric conditioners and any other chemical products that come into contact with the skin. use household gloves for housework, and be careful of latex household gloves (some people are allergic to latex) Even some fibres may irritate, cotton clothes are best

                  5. Although allergy to things that come in direct contact with the skin, it can be exacerbated by food allergies. If you think this may be the case, keep a diary of what you eat and how bad your eczema is, and see if there's a pattern.
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