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You can see jupiter tonight!

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  • You can see jupiter tonight!

    Jupiter Making Closest Approach to Earth in 47 Years


    Updated: 1 day 2 hours ago

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    AOL Canada
    Better catch Jupiter this week in the night sky. It won't be that big or bright again until 2022.

    Jupiter will pass 368 million miles from Earth late Monday, its closest approach since 1963. You can see it low in the east around dusk. Around midnight, it will be directly overhead. That's because Earth will be passing between Jupiter and the sun, into the wee hours of Tuesday.




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    Views From Space
    This image provided by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope taken with it's Wide Field Camera 3 on Thursday July 23, 2009 shows the sharpest visible-light picture taken of the impact feature (dark spot) and "backsplash" of material from a small object that plunged into Jupiter's atmosphere and disintegrated. The only other time in history such a feature has been seen on Jupiter was in 1994 during the collision of fragments from comet Shoemaker-Levy 9. This is a natural color image of Jupiter as seen in visible light.
    AP Photo/NASA
    NASA / ESA / SSC / CXC / STScI


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    This image provided Wednesday, April 21, 2010 by NASA shows an eruptive prominence blasting away from the sun, upper left, March 30, 2010 observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory satellite. NASA on Wednesday unveiled the first images from the new satellite designed to predict disruptive solar storms, and scientists say they're already learning new things.
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    The sun shines over the Earth in this photo by British hobbyist Robert Harrison. The space enthusiast has caught the eye of NASA officials after taking some remarkable photos of the Earth's surface from space. Hobbyist Robert Harrison spent a little more than $700 to conquer space. And all it required was a digital camera, some duct tape, a GPS system, a helium balloon, and a bit of ingenuity.
    Views From Space
    Clouds are seen over the Earth's surface in this photo by British hobbyist Robert Harrison. The space enthusiast has caught the eye of NASA officials after taking some remarkable photos of the Earth's surface from space. Hobbyist Robert Harrison spent a little more than $700 to conquer space. And all it required was a digital camera, some duct tape, a GPS system, a helium balloon, and a bit of ingenuity.
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    An image released by NASA Jan. 5, 2010, shows Sagittarius A, the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way Galaxy made from data provided by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The Chandra image of Sagittarius A and the surrounding region is based on data from a series of observations lasting a total of about one million seconds, or almost two weeks.
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    A TV communications satellite is drifting out of control thousands of miles above the Earth, threatening to wander into another satellite's orbit and interfere with cable programming across the United States, the satellites' owners said Tuesday, May 11. Above, in an image from NASA Television one of the spherical satellites comes out of its canister, upper left, after it was deployed from the shuttle Discovery above the Pacific Ocean, Thursday, Dec. 21, 2006.
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    The solar system's largest planet already appears as an incredibly bright star - three times brighter than the brightest star in the sky, Sirius. The only thing brighter in the night sky right now is our moon. Binoculars and telescopes will dramatically improve the view as Jupiter, along with its many moons, rises in the east as the sun sets.

    "Jupiter is so bright right now, you don't need a sky map to find it," said Tony Phillips, a California astronomer under contract with NASA. "You just walk outside and see it. It's so eye-catching, there it is."

    Phillips has never seen Jupiter so bright. "To an experienced observer, the difference is notable," he said Friday.

    Coincidentally, Uranus also will make a close approach the same night. It will appear close to Jupiter but harder to see with the naked eye. Through a telescope, it will shine like an emerald-colored disk less than one degree from Jupiter.

    Jupiter comes relatively close to Earth about every 12 years. In 1999, it passed slightly farther away.

    What's rare this time is Uranus making a close appearance at the same time, Phillips said. He called it "a once-in-a-lifetime event." While seen right next to Jupiter through a telescope, Uranus actually will be 1.7 billion miles from Earth on Monday night.

    Phillips urges stargazers not to give up if it's cloudy Monday night. Jupiter will remain relatively close for many weeks, he noted, providing good viewing opportunities for some time. And for those who are early risers instead of night owls, Jupiter will be visible setting in the west just before sunrise.
    http://news.aol.ca/ca/article/jupite...c1_lnk3|171699
    ‎"Listen with the ears of tolerance. See through the eyes of compassion. Speak with the language of love."
    Rumi RahimuAllah.

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