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Hifz Experiences

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  • #61
    Re: Hifz Experiences

    Also read it in Tahajjud prayer. Its the best thing ever.

    10 a day is quite a stretch. If I'm reading regular every day, the most juzz I can read in one go in 7 or 8 then I start to feel sickish.

    There's even a hadith which says that (not the exact words) read as much as your heart allows.
    الصلوۃ والسلام علیک یا سیدی یارسول اللہ

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    • #62
      Re: Hifz Experiences

      Originally posted by Kas1m View Post
      Also read it in Tahajjud prayer. Its the best thing ever.

      10 a day is quite a stretch. If I'm reading regular every day, the most juzz I can read in one go in 7 or 8 then I start to feel sickish.

      There's even a hadith which says that (not the exact words) read as much as your heart allows.
      10 a day during Ramadan is do- able come on , you can do 5 juzz in about 2-3 hours if recite at a average pase and then another 3 hours after asr till magrib and your done

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      • #63
        Re: Hifz Experiences

        :start:

        ~~~~~~

        When people ask me how long it took me to complete my hifz, I’m not really sure how to reply. I consider saying either more than ten years; or just under two years.

        This is because I started memorising when I was still in primary school and would memorise at my afternoon madrasah. It continued during high school, where I would attend the hifz class they had there after school each day. So by the time I completed my schooling career, I had managed to finish about 25 ajza. However, my dhor (old lessons) was extremely weak; practically non-existent I’d say. I didn’t really know what I had memorised.

        Continue reading
        "And thus have We willed you to be a community of the middle way."
        (al-Baqarah: 143)

        Allahumma innaa na'udhu bika min an nushrika bika shai-an na'lamuh; wa nastaghfiruka limaa laa na'lam.

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        • #64
          Re: Hifz Experiences

          People keep saying that the mind is at its best at fajr, but i am the only one who finds it extremely difficult? SubhanAllah maybe its to do with my eeman. Can u enlighten me in ways to stay up after fajr?
          Allahumma innaa na'udhu bika min an nushrika bika shai-an na'lamuh; wa nastaghfiruka limaa laa na'lam

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          • #65
            Re: Hifz Experiences

            No, I also don't learn that well at that time. It's probably a good time for most people, but that doesn't mean it applies to everyone.
            "And thus have We willed you to be a community of the middle way."
            (al-Baqarah: 143)

            Allahumma innaa na'udhu bika min an nushrika bika shai-an na'lamuh; wa nastaghfiruka limaa laa na'lam.

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            • #66
              Re: Hifz Experiences

              Originally posted by Sam_87 View Post
              People keep saying that the mind is at its best at fajr, but i am the only one who finds it extremely difficult? SubhanAllah maybe its to do with my eeman. Can u enlighten me in ways to stay up after fajr?
              Not only is the mind at its best and most alert, it is also witnessed by the Angels:

              "Keep up prayer from the declining of the sun till the darkness of the night and the morning recitation; surely the morning recitation is witnessed." (17:78)

              That should be the first thing one should keep in mind when intending to read the Qur'an after fajr: to seek the Face of Allah and enjoy the blessings of your recitation being witnessed by the Angels.

              Also a practical tips that may insha Allah facilitate your reading after fajr:

              1) Don't read on your bed! You will inevitably end up falling asleep.

              2) Have your mashaf by your place of prayer. Simply pick it up and read it whilst on your masallah.

              3) Set yourself small baby goals. Initially, intend to read only half a page and increase the amount you read daily. Insha Allah in time the sweetness of the Qur'an will permeate your tongue making you want to read more and more! insha Allah!

              4) Make dua to Allah to help you and make your reading of His book easy for you. He will answer it bi'itnillah.

              Incidentally, from what I've heard it takes about 2 weeks of constantly doing something daily for it to become a habit. You will feel sluggish and lazy as you embark on this noble journey but as you persevere and fight the waswas of shaytaan you will insha Allah find yourself reaching a point when you physically CAN'T go back to sleep until you've read some Qur'an!

              Give yourself a 2 week target and may Allah make it easy for you and for us ajma3een!

              AQ
              What can my enemies possibly do to me? My paradise is in my heart; wherever I go it goes with me, inseparable from me. For me, prison is a place of retreat; execution is my opportunity for martyrdom; and exile from my town is but a chance to travel - Ibn Taymiyyah

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              • #67
                Re: Hifz Experiences

                Jzk akhi, May Allah SWT reward u with Ilm
                Allahumma innaa na'udhu bika min an nushrika bika shai-an na'lamuh; wa nastaghfiruka limaa laa na'lam

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                • #68
                  Re: Hifz Experiences

                  :start:

                  We planned and planned for the end of Juz Amma. At first, it was to happen in March, then April. Those months came and went, and we were still struggling with Surah Al Inshiqaq, then Mutaffifeen. A trip to Dallas was deferred, in part, as that was to be our celebratory spot. Day after day, we worked (albeit after my son’s Kindergarten classes and with the constant interruption of his younger sister) learning and reviewing. Sometimes the ayaat were difficult; sometimes they were less difficult, but they were never easy, and the end-date kept being pushed out. In June, I stopped planning. My six year old son would reach the end of Juz Amma when it was right for him. We would continue working, but I wanted to do away with the pressure for fear that it might take away from the fun and ultimately the true learning of hifdh al Qur’aan. We resumed more drawing and calligraphy, more translation, more recitation while walking, more hifdh games, more focus
                  on the sequencing of surahs—an area he loved, and one that his sister could enjoy as well. Of course, somewhere in the back of my mind, I wondered how we would ever reach the end, but I no longer communicated it to him. Meanwhile, I completed my own memorization of the Juz, approximately a month before Ramadan, but deferred any family celebration of my own for a later date when my son would join me (followed, hopefully, by his sister, one day, as well).

                  And then Ramadan dawned, and my son grew up, or so it seemed. He made Taraweeh a top priority. He integrated fasting and charity. He chose tilawaat as his pre-magreb activity, with very little to no cajoling on my part. We were still in Surah An Naziat, and I concluded that it would take us at least two more months given the pace of the previous months before we would be near the end of the Juz. But it was Ramadan, and miracles were in abundance (or perhaps we were simply more open to noticing them). And so, with the miraculous backdrop of Ramadan, my son approached the end of Juz Amma, with his sister repeating, all along the way. What I was expecting as an Eid gift did not, however, happen. On Eid, he was a good 10 ayaat off, and the following day he felt ill. And yet, it was in his illness that our little miracle finally occurred. Idle on his bed, we worked over the last 10 ayaat. Previously he had managed one, max two, ayah per day. Ten was unheard
                  of for us, and yet the day after Eid, we had another small celebration.

                  Meanwhile, we had long since re-planned the Dallas trip (over the weekend following Eid); it was simply intended to be a family, Eid get-together. On Saturday evening, three days after he had completed the Juz, the children were playing late into the night with their cousins. I tried to convince them of bedtime. In our midst was their father and four uncles. Remembering the recent accomplishment (and still trying to engage the children and get them off to bed), I beckoned for them to join the men who were seated on the couch. “Does your Uncle M know you completed the Juz?” I asked my son. He shook his head ‘no’; his sister mimicked him. “Do you want to recite something?” I suggested. He slowly found a seat on my lap, while his sister took up a spot in his father’s lap. One of their uncles who was nearby moved to give us space, not quite understanding our intentions.

                  I asked for the men’s attention, and whether they would be open to hearing my son recite. At once, there was quiet. I could feel my son’s palms press gently against mine. He looked at his uncles and then directly at his father, who had not yet heard him recite Surah An Naba, and he began. The recitation was not perfect, but it was beautiful masha’Allah. There were three instances where he lost his way, but I was there holding his hand, and he was able to navigate swiftly and smoothly back on course alhumdulilah. For both of us, it was a rite of passage (me as one of his coaches and him as the aspiring hafidh) in the company of his uncles and father. On some level, it was also a rite of passage for his sister, as she was the only voice, other than his and mine, occasionally, which could be heard —as she softly repeated ayaat she had heard her brother practice, over and over again. It was not the party for which we planned, but it was a celebration, of life, of family, of maturing into the Qur’aan and letting the text animate and shape our lives. Suffice it to say, I am humbled and very grateful for having had the real plan change me.

                  In faith, and constant awe,
                  Umm Muhemmed

                  (Link)
                  "And thus have We willed you to be a community of the middle way."
                  (al-Baqarah: 143)

                  Allahumma innaa na'udhu bika min an nushrika bika shai-an na'lamuh; wa nastaghfiruka limaa laa na'lam.

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                  • #69
                    Re: Hifz Experiences

                    :jkk: nice thread. Encouraging
                    check out this blog>>>http://myworldmuslimah.wordpress.com/

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                    • #70
                      Re: Hifz Experiences

                      Yes Jazakallah Khair for this thread.

                      Great reminder.

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                      • #71
                        Re: Hifz Experiences

                        :jkk:

                        Someone should sticky this, insha'Allah.
                        Ya Muqallib al-Quloob, thabbit qalbi 'alaa Deenik
                        O' Converter of Hearts, make my heart steadfast upon Thy Way
                        We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.

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                        • #72
                          Re: Hifz Experiences

                          mashAllah excellent thread, every1 make duaa i can start doin hifz

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                          • #73
                            Re: Hifz Experiences

                            May Allah bless us with memorization of the Quran. Ameen.
                            Blessed is He in Whose Hand is the Dominion, and He is Able to do all things. (67.1)

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                            • #74
                              Re: Hifz Experiences

                              ^ Ameen ya Rabb.

                              I hope to share my experience one day soon.
                              Last edited by Hamnah; 04-11-11, 08:41 PM.
                              اذاً لن يضيعنا الله

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                              • #75
                                Re: Hifz Experiences

                                :salams

                                So intention is where I think Im going wrong. It migh be a silly question but how can u be sure that you have the right intentions? Sometimes I have waswas that I'm doing it for such and such reason (other than pleasing Allah).
                                Allahumma innaa na'udhu bika min an nushrika bika shai-an na'lamuh; wa nastaghfiruka limaa laa na'lam

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