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UK: Young men most vulnerable to suicide

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  • UK: Young men most vulnerable to suicide

    Nov 7 2003
    The Western Mail

    YOUNG men continue to be the most likely to commit suicide, with almost half opting for hanging and suffocation, figures revealed yesterday.

    Men aged 15 to 44 have had the highest suicide rate since the late 1990s, accounting for 60% of all deaths in men at the peak of suicides in 1998.

    But young women, aged 15 to 44, had the lowest suicide rate between 1979 and 2001 - the period studied by the Office for National Statistics (ONS).

    The suicide trends were among a series of figures published by the ONS in its Health Statistics Quarterly publication.

    The ONS also revealed that people in Manchester continue to have the lowest life expectancy of anywhere in England and Wales.

    Men and women from the city can expect to reach 71 years and 77.3 respectively - compared to an average of 75.9 and 80.6 years, according to figures calculated between 2000-2002.

    They show that men in Rutland can expect to live the longest, reaching 79.5 years on average.

    Highest life expectancy for women is in Kensington and Chelsea, where females can expect to survive for just over 84 years on average.

    For the first time, the ONS used information from death certificates provided by coroners to look at different methods of suicide.

    They found that suicide in young men from hanging, strangulation and suffocation had almost doubled between 1979 and 1998.

    There was also a 50% increase in suicide by those methods among young women during the 1990s.

    Most common methods of suicide among women were drug-related, accounting for 46% in 2001.

    Only 20% of male suicides were by drugs.

    Antidepressants and paracetamol were the two most commonly mentioned substances on drug-related poisoning, suicide death certificates in both 1993 and 2001.

    Suicides from "other" poisoning, such as carbon monoxide poisoning (being gassed in a car), declined dramatically in men during the course of the 1990s.

    This could be partly put down to 1993 legislation concerning the use of catalytic converters on cars, as well as the increase in hanging as the preferred suicide method.

    In other statistics, infant mortality figures showed that babies born outside marriage were 42% more at risk than others.

    The ONS also looked at the increase of 6% in stillbirths in England and Wales in 2002, compared with the previous year - the first increase since the definition of a stillbirth was changed in 1992.

    Stillbirths outside marriage, that were registered solely by the mother, increased by 24% - higher than at any time since 1993.

    But the increase in stillbirths between 2001 and 2002 showed no clear link with birth weight, age of mother, gestation, sex, mother's country of birth or cause of stillbirth.

    All the figures in Health Statistics Quarterly are available on the website www.statistics.gov.uk.

    http://icwales.icnetwork.co.uk/0100n...name_page.html
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  • #2
    No wonder, I heard on the radio today that, according to a new survey, young male drivers are much more likely to commit accidents than their female counterparts.

    As a male, this is a shame to admit, but it is very probably true.
    Please Re-update your Signature

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