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  • #16
    Re: feminist and muslim??

    Originally posted by miss-islamic View Post

    God-given rights. InshaAllah.
    very true quote
    Surat Al-An'am verse 26: Of them there are some who (pretend to) listen to thee; but We have thrown veils on their hearts, so they understand it not, and deafness in their ears; if they saw every one of the Signs, they will not believe in them; in so much that when they come to thee; they (but) dispute with thee; the Unbelievers say: "These are nothing but tales of the ancients."

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    • #17
      Re: feminist and muslim??

      Originally posted by Kal-El View Post
      I know someone who whole-heartedly believes Islam dictates any woman to be worth only half, of any man. Half the value, half the intelligence etc..

      That person is a female Muslim.
      does she say where in islam this view is supported?
      muslim sister

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      • #18
        Re: feminist and muslim??

        Originally posted by heaven2002 View Post
        does she say where in islam this view is supported?
        Might be because of the fact that 2 female witnesses can be used in place of 1 male? ... :scratch:
        "...Creator of the heavens and the earth! You are my Protector and my Guardian in this world and the Hereafter. Make me die as a Muslim,and join me with the righteous."12:101
        Please as you read this, make du'a to Allah SWT to guide all those "interested in Islam" to take the decisive step.

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        • #19
          Re: feminist and muslim??

          Originally posted by Cristiana View Post
          Might be because of the fact that 2 female witnesses can be used in place of 1 male? ... :scratch:
          might be. but i dont see how this can be then interpreted to mean that in islam a woman is 'half the value' of a man as the poster quoted

          inshallah will post more articles of muslim women who a believe were early feminists (as according to definition in original post) tomorrow
          muslim sister

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          • #20
            Re: feminist and muslim??

            Kal El, the Muslim girl you're referring to clearly doesn't understand Islam much. Maybe she's been talking to too many feminists:p I'm sticking to my original point anyhow:

            Originally posted by neelu View Post
            Why are people seeking to give new fangled Kufar labels to what Allah (swt) has already given us in Islam for centuries? Is Islam not good enough; that people want to refer to our God given rights as "Feminism", "Human rights", "Freedom" etc
            The Lyme Disease pandemic: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z5u73ME4sVU

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            • #21
              Re: feminist and muslim??

              Originally posted by Cristiana View Post
              Might be because of the fact that 2 female witnesses can be used in place of 1 male? ... :scratch:


              Yes, that too but also she referred to (dont know the complete hadith), where it says our women are our other half? She focused on the word I assume, and took it literally as if "they are half"
              If you read this closely enough you might spot the secret message hidden in it

              Mr President, You Are Wrong

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              • #22
                Re: feminist and muslim??

                Men are the protectors and maintainers of women, because Allâh has made one of them to excel the other, and because they spend (to support them) from their means. Therefore the righteous women are devoutly obedient (to Allâh and to their husbands), and guard in the husband's absence what Allâh orders them to guard (e.g. their chastity, their husband's property, etc.). As to those women on whose part you see ill*conduct, admonish them (first), (next), refuse to share their beds, (and last) beat them (lightly, if it is useful), but if they return to obedience, seek not against them means (of annoyance). Surely, Allâh is Ever Most High, Most Great. (An-Nisa 4:34)

                One of the things that we as muslims must understand is that we must firstly refer back to the book of Allah (Quran) and the sunnah of His Messenger Muhammad (s) in all affairs. Secondly that Islam is a way of life. Allah has given the Men distinctive roles, as he has given the Women their role in society. So each person must abide by his/her role in society inorder for the society to be up right. Im tired of hearing that the women dont have certain rights as men do. Of course not because they are not men, as on the flip side men dont have certain rights that women posses. I could sit up here and complain about it not being fare that women dont have to pray a week out of the month, where as us men caint miss a single prayer EVER, without a legitamite excuse. But the truth of the matter is that we were created different, thus our rights are different and that is something that we as a community have to accept. Like the sahabas said "we hear and we obey".
                Last edited by MedinaGreen; 24-02-07, 01:56 AM.

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                • #23
                  Re: feminist and muslim??

                  u cnt be a feminist and be a muslim sister Ideologically coz they just dont go together, the feministic term and thoughts are a western concept which have not only now become a problem for the west it self, but also a big problem in communitys of muslims...if so called Feminitic women thought about it, islam it its pure form of quran and sunnah gives women a much more beautifull life and reward.

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                  • #24
                    Re: feminist and muslim??

                    WHEN Imam Zuhri, a famous scholar of Sunna (Prophet Muhammad's traditions), indicated to Qasim ibn Muhammd (a scholar of the Qur'an), a desire to seek knowledge, Qasim advised him to join the assembly of a well-known woman jurist of the day, Amara bin Al-Rahman. Imam Zuhri attended her assembly and later described her as "a boundless ocean of knowledge." In fact, Amra instructed a number of famed scholars, such as Abu Bakr Muhammad ibn Hazama, and Yahya ibn Said.

                    Amra was not an anomaly in Islamic history, for it abounds with famous women narrators of jurisprudence, starting with Aisha, the Prophet's wife. A conservative count would reveal at least 2,500 extraordinary women jurists, narrators of Hadith, and poets throughout history.

                    That was then, but now we encounter hardly a single Islamic woman jurist. Women are all but absent from Islamic public and intellectual life. There are remarkable women activists in many Mosques and there are a few impressive writers, such as Zaynab al-Ghazali. But these are exceptions. One will rarely find a woman lecturing to a mixed audience about a gender-neutral topic such as "riba" (usury), for example. And while it is common to encounter professional Muslim women in every walk of life, it is very rare to find them on the boards of Islamic centers, or holding leadership positions.

                    There are several reasons for this alarming phenomenon. A particularly disturbing one is the derogatory attitude that seems to have infected many Muslim men. Very few are willing to be instructed or taught by women. Muslim men, in North America and elsewhere, seem to have developed a woman-phobia that consistently aspires to exclude women from conferences, meetings, gatherings, and even the Mosques.

                    May God bless Fatimah bint Qais, who tenaciously argued with Hazrat Umar and Hazrat Aisha over a legal point and refused to change her opinion. And there was Umm Yaqab, who on hearing Abdullah ibn Masud explain a legal point, then confidently told him, "I have read the entire Qur'an but have not found your explanation anywhere in it."

                    The fact is, that Islam neither limits women to the private sphere, nor does it give men supremacy over the public and private life. One notices that the Greek and Roman cultures that preceded Islamic civilization did not produce a single eminent woman philosopher or jurist. Likewise, until the 1700s, Europe failed to produce a single female social, political, or legal jurist. Islam did exactly the opposite in every respect, so much so that Hazart Umar bin al-Khitatab used to entrust Shaffa bint Abdullah as an inspector over the market in Medina. Moreover, Islamic history is replete with examples of female professors who tutored famous male jurists.

                    Yet the sad legacy of our time is that we have taken women back to the pre-Islamic era by excluding them from public exposure or involvement. A modern scholar, Muhammad al-Ghazali, once described this phenomenon as the "ascendency of Bedouin fiqh (jusrisprudence)." What he meant by this term is that in much of contemporary culture... the world revolves around men and everything is channeled to their service.

                    The sunna (traditions) of the Prophet reveals that he used to assist his wives in household duties. But most modern scholars have not had the probity to suggest that the practice of men lending a helping hand in the home is to be recommended or even required in certain circumstances. Most men are content to ignore this and selectively emphasize whatever in the sunna serves only their interests. It is well-known that women like Aisha, Umm Salamah, Laila bint Qasim, Asma bint Abu Bakr, Khaula bint Umm Darda, and many others, were trusted with preserving and teaching one fourth of our religion.

                    Isn't it time we again trusted women to contribute to our public and intellectual lives? May the Muslim community in North America lead the way in producing the first Muslim woman jurist in more than two centuries. It is certainly long overdue.



                    Professor Khalid Abou El Fadl. Dr. Abou El Fadl is a law professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he specializes in Islamic Law
                    muslim sister

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                    • #25
                      Re: feminist and muslim??


                      yes i agree with you, i think men and women do have different roles to an extent , however looking at islamic history and the role of women as islamic teachers/jurists in the days of early islam it seems like islam in this day and age has forgotten about how vital women were and still could be in fields such as islamic law
                      muslim sister

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                      • #26
                        Re: feminist and muslim??

                        Quran:
                        muslim sister

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                        • #27
                          Re: feminist and muslim??

                          Originally posted by heaven2002 View Post
                          yes i agree with you, i think men and women do have different roles to an extent , however looking at islamic history and the role of women as islamic teachers/jurists in the days of early islam it seems like islam in this day and age has forgotten about how vital women were and still could be in fields such as islamic law
                          You rarely find women seeking knowledge today unfortunatley. There is a female student of Knowledge from Yemen her name is Umm Abdillah Al-Wadiyyah. MashaAllah she has wrote a few books on various topics. (My Advice to the Women), and also (Supporting the Rights of the Believing Women) these books are extremely beneficial, she often relates to the female readers, while keeping to the authentic Sources. MahsaAllah you can see that she is a possessor of knowledge when reading her books. She never gives an opinion with out supporting it with a text from the quran and the sunnah. I urge all women to read these books they are full of benefit. And Yes i have read them! A man who is of the opinion that Allah has made the male superior to women as He has stated in the Quran. But like my friend said Our mother Aiesha was a Scholar from amongst the sahaba and sahabiyyat. She was from the 5 that narrated the most hadith from the prophet(s), and that is were we get our religion from. Was She a feminist?? La she was a Scholar of Al-Islam.
                          Last edited by MedinaGreen; 24-02-07, 09:54 PM.

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                          • #28
                            Re: feminist and muslim??

                            Originally posted by MedinaGreen View Post
                            Men are the protectors and maintainers of women, because Allâh has made one of them to excel the other, and because they spend (to support them) from their means. Therefore the righteous women are devoutly obedient (to Allâh and to their husbands), and guard in the husband's absence what Allâh orders them to guard (e.g. their chastity, their husband's property, etc.). As to those women on whose part you see ill*conduct, admonish them (first), (next), refuse to share their beds, (and last) beat them (lightly, if it is useful), but if they return to obedience, seek not against them means (of annoyance). Surely, Allâh is Ever Most High, Most Great. (An-Nisa 4:34)

                            One of the things that we as muslims must understand is that we must firstly refer back to the book of Allah (Quran) and the sunnah of His Messenger Muhammad (s) in all affairs. Secondly that Islam is a way of life. Allah has given the Men distinctive roles, as he has given the Women their role in society. So each person must abide by his/her role in society inorder for the society to be up right. Im tired of hearing that the women dont have certain rights as men do. Of course not because they are not men, as on the flip side men dont have certain rights that women posses. I could sit up here and complain about it not being fare that women dont have to pray a week out of the month, where as us men caint miss a single prayer EVER, without a legitamite excuse. But the truth of the matter is that we were created different, thus our rights are different and that is something that we as a community have to accept. Like the sahabas said "we hear and we obey".
                            I agree with you.

                            The fact that we have a week "off" praying... well... is for a biological thing we have no control over. Although I understand that not missing 1 single prayer in your life is quite a big thing, I miss praying when I can't.

                            What I refer to as "feminism" is that we should "hear and obey" Quran and Sunna, but we should beware of those brothers that distort the real contents of Islam to walk all over women according to what suits them.

                            In order to defend herself from this, every muslima should seek (first hand) knowledge of Islam insha'Allah:) (...one more reason to do so).

                            But yes, "feminism" is a label for something much more radical and completely alien to Islam (= alhamdulillah Islam provides us with our rights, as someone rightfully pointed out above).

                            What I mean is that I am very sensitive towards gender discrimination.
                            Alhamdulillah Islam has set me free from the need to "BURN MY BRA":D
                            "...Creator of the heavens and the earth! You are my Protector and my Guardian in this world and the Hereafter. Make me die as a Muslim,and join me with the righteous."12:101
                            Please as you read this, make du'a to Allah SWT to guide all those "interested in Islam" to take the decisive step.

                            Comment

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