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Random FOOD Thread ---/ What did you eat today?/ What did you make today?

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  • Oh cool photo. I've never seen dates like that before. They look like proper fruits- like apricots. I wonder if that means they taste different.

    In my experience a lot depends on the freshness of the dates. I used to buy mejdool dates but noticed a variation in quality depending on where they were from and how fresh or old the batch was. Now I eat ajwa dates and noticed that even though they might have an expiry date a year long, but once you take them out of the packet (even if it's to store them in a jar or sealed bag), they dry out and after 6 weeks they taste more dry and sometimes go bad or have tiny bugs in them, whereas the first couple of weeks after opening the packet, that same batch tastes fresh and nice. This is why I don't buy big boxes of them and buy them in small batches. Sometimes I think maybe I should invest in some proper airtight jars to see if that helps preserve the freshness a bit longer.

    Originally posted by Mufti Cheesecake View Post
    Also, isn't it weird, for most of us that grew up outside of warm climates, and maybe even others, when we think of dates, we think of the dried dates. But when our Prophet (SAW) was referring to dates, it was usually the fresh dates, he broke his fasts with fresh dates, unless he didn't have fresh, then he'd eat dried ones.



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    Another note about dates: bear in mind, it's not just the 'Israel' dates you have to avoid, but also some are listed as from 'Gaza' but are actually 'settlement produce' (ie came from stolen land in the hands of Allah's enemies) and mainstream supermarkets still sell them. Also certain 'Israeli' brands don't say Israel but will disguise their origins by saying something along the lines of 'Jordan Valley' or that sort of thing. If the origins are vague such as 'Middle East' then that should make you suspicious.
    The Lyme Disease pandemic: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z5u73ME4sVU

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    • Originally posted by neelu View Post
      Oh cool photo. I've never seen dates like that before. They look like proper fruits- like apricots. I wonder if that means they taste different.
      Ye thats how dates look fresh from the tree, crazy right? And ye they do taste different, the taste reminds me of sugar canes, and also a bit of tartness.

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      • I've had the raw dates when I went Hajj and not a fan, it has an apple like texture and is sort of like sugar cane, but the latter is better in taste.
        I prefer the dried ones and there was a fresh version of the dried one which was SO.DAIM.GUD.

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        • I've seen the harvesting of mejdool dates on TV and the way they showed it, mejdool dates pretty much look the same on the tree as they do in the supermarket- in other words, the ones we see in the shops are also fresh dates and not dried. Dried dates in Pakistan are called chuwaray and have a much firmer, stiffer texture and I don't like them. I guess a lot depends on the type of date you get as to whether there's a huge contrast between fresh and dried or not.
          The Lyme Disease pandemic: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z5u73ME4sVU

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          • A bit off topic but do any Pakistanis (or anyone else tbh) know how to make chapli kebabs if so please share the recipe!! I’ve tried watching YouTube videos but don’t really understand them. I’ve used the spice mix for it before and added my own stuff but would prefer not to use a mix it possible! Hopefully someone has a good recipe for it
            https://islamicgemsandpearls.wordpress.com

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            • Originally posted by neelu View Post
              I've seen the harvesting of mejdool dates on TV and the way they showed it, mejdool dates pretty much look the same on the tree as they do in the supermarket- in other words, the ones we see in the shops are also fresh dates and not dried. Dried dates in Pakistan are called chuwaray and have a much firmer, stiffer texture and I don't like them. I guess a lot depends on the type of date you get as to whether there's a huge contrast between fresh and dried or not.
              They were probably just really ripe dates. When they grow on the tree they're first yellow like in the pic I posted. If you leave the dates for longer they darken and get softer, more like the dry dates, but they're still juicy. Just like any other fruit, if you leave it on the tree:

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              and then if you leave it longer:

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              It makes sense why they'd leave it to ripen especially if they're producing them for shipping internationally, or maybe even if they just prefer those ones, they're sweeter and softer, and easier to dry from that stage.


              Ya I don't like those really dry hard dates either.

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              • Originally posted by Layla_ View Post
                A bit off topic but do any Pakistanis (or anyone else tbh) know how to make chapli kebabs if so please share the recipe!! I’ve tried watching YouTube videos but don’t really understand them. I’ve used the spice mix for it before and added my own stuff but would prefer not to use a mix it possible! Hopefully someone has a good recipe for it
                Nothing about food is off topic here

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                • Abisali

                  I don't have measurements as such because I eye ball ingredients (this is why I don't bake because you have to have the measure quite accurate).

                  For the usual chicken curry I use:

                  - oil
                  -onions -garlic ginger paste
                  -salt to taste
                  -coriander, turmeric, chilli powder, cumin and optional is garam masala, you don't have to if you add whole spices like cinnamon and cardomom which I do, near curries definitely need those for the smell (we usually boil the meat and chicken before adding to curries, my mum prefers to).


                  Method:

                  Cook the onions until sauted or soft, add salt while it cooks because this quickens the softening process, add garlic and ginger, add the whole spices if using

                  once soft, add all your spices, stir and wait for it to cook, once oil is on on the top you know it is ready for the protein, of the sauce gets dry add some water so it doesn't burn

                  Add chicken and stir, wait for it to release water

                  Stir and add a bit more water (I like bhuna style, this has a thicker sauce). (Sometimes I like adding tomatoes or tomatoe puree, can also cook with other vegetables).

                  Boil it and ready to serve

                  You can add fresh coriander if you want


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                  • I'm very sorry but forum is actually getting on my nerves
                    S seriously irritate with the typos, I type a word and it acts up


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                    • So more spelling mistakes than usual

                      Let me know if you want clarity
                      Jzk

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                      • For rough measurements I'd say teaspoon for each spcie bit add more coriander so 1 and a half
                        you can add less chilli powder or replace with paprika, I'd say add half a teaspoon or a quarter of chilli and a bit of paprika if you aren't sure about the heat

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Ya'sin View Post
                          Abisali

                          I don't have measurements as such because I eye ball ingredients (this is why I don't bake because you have to have the measure quite accurate).

                          For the usual chicken curry I use:

                          - oil
                          -onions -garlic ginger paste
                          -salt to taste
                          -coriander, turmeric, chilli powder, cumin and optional is garam masala, you don't have to if you add whole spices like cinnamon and cardomom which I do, near curries definitely need those for the smell (we usually boil the meat and chicken before adding to curries, my mum prefers to).


                          Method:

                          Cook the onions until sauted or soft, add salt while it cooks because this quickens the softening process, add garlic and ginger, add the whole spices if using

                          once soft, add all your spices, stir and wait for it to cook, once oil is on on the top you know it is ready for the protein, of the sauce gets dry add some water so it doesn't burn

                          Add chicken and stir, wait for it to release water

                          Stir and add a bit more water (I like bhuna style, this has a thicker sauce). (Sometimes I like adding tomatoes or tomatoe puree, can also cook with other vegetables).

                          Boil it and ready to serve

                          You can add fresh coriander if you want

                          Thank you very much. I'll try to make this when I'm not tired or being lazy.

                          Comment


                          • After a very long time indeed, I finally got round to cooking something today alhamdullilah and it's a new recipe I'd never tried before but it's so simple I let curiosity get the better of me and tried it out. These pancakes are gluten free, egg free, sugar free, nut free- it's such an easy recipe and I'm really pleased with how it turned out. These are besan and banana pancakes and even though it was sugar free, I ate them on their own and they still had a nice subtle sweetness to them. Before I ate them I thought they'd need a topping of nutella or maple syrup but that turned out to be unnecessary.

                            I think this would make a good sehri breakfast and I'm wondering if it might be suitable for some diabetics (ie those who don't get a sugar spike if they have banana) as a sugar free sweet treat.

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                            The Lyme Disease pandemic: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z5u73ME4sVU

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                            • i've been having parata with curry, banana, muesli bar, milkshake, dates and water for suhoor since beginning of ramadan. this morning i only had 3 dates and a glass of water and i feel better.
                              There is a clock on your forehead counting down to the time of your death. Only Allah knows how many seconds are left on it

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                              • Originally posted by Mufti Cheesecake View Post

                                They were probably just really ripe dates. When they grow on the tree they're first yellow like in the pic I posted. If you leave the dates for longer they darken and get softer, more like the dry dates, but they're still juicy. Just like any other fruit, if you leave it on the tree:

                                Click image for larger version

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                                and then if you leave it longer:

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                                It makes sense why they'd leave it to ripen especially if they're producing them for shipping internationally, or maybe even if they just prefer those ones, they're sweeter and softer, and easier to dry from that stage.


                                Ya I don't like those really dry hard dates either.
                                how do these fresh yelloq dates taste compared to the older dried brown ones we tend to eat?

                                remember seeing them years ago and i was like no way thats not dates lol

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