Ads by Muslim Ad Network

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

RAW Honey & Bee Pollen

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • RAW Honey & Bee Pollen

    Assalamualaiku wah rahmatullahi wah barakatuhu

    hey peeps so i know some of you are into raw honey but i was wondering how many of you have tried bee pollen?

    This bee pollen is supposed to be amazing classed as like a 'superfood' due to its nutritional content subhanAllah

    Got some the other day alongside with some RAW Honey as i needed some more

    Been wanting to buy this bee pollen for so long so got a chnace and snapped it up Alhamdulillah Allahumma Bareek

    Best way to describe the taste of the bee pollen is probably exactly like how some youtuber said and he called it earthy, so i sort of agree with that tbf



    This is the RAW Honey and Bee Pollen i got Alhamdulillah Allahumma Bareek 💯🔥👍

    Please make dua Allah swt uses it as a means to grant me shifa Ameen
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Simply_Logical; 27-07-21, 11:05 PM.

  • #2
    Hope it works for you. Didi's ex husband used to take bee pollen for his hayfever. Can't remember whether it helped much though. I've been wondering whether to try Royal Jelly as that's meant to be a bee made product that's good for health too, though never tried it so don't know what to expect.
    The Lyme Disease pandemic: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z5u73ME4sVU

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by neelu View Post
      Hope it works for you. Didi's ex husband used to take bee pollen for his hayfever. Can't remember whether it helped much though. I've been wondering whether to try Royal Jelly as that's meant to be a bee made product that's good for health too, though never tried it so don't know what to expect.
      i like bee pollen but got like a earthy taste Alhamdulillah Allahumma Bareek no allergic reactions at all

      yea i heard about royal jelly forgot what that one words called but its a by product

      Comment


      • #4
        neelu i went to a bee show recently, was amazing to see the queen bee and was like at least 1000 bees within the frames the local beekeepers brought with them

        also had some nice honey, beeswax and all sorts of products for sale too

        i did ask the beekeepers if its true whether its true or if its a myth that if you have local honey it helps with your hayfever,
        answer i got in a nutshell was theres no scientific proof could be a myth but it comes down to personal experiences, som say it helps and some dont, could be potentially be a placebo, Allah knows best

        Comment


        • #5

          Some beneficial link:
          https://www.pule.si/en/experiences/apitherapy

          Bee polen is a real superfood.
          Some recommend soaking 1-2 tablespoons of granules in water or milk from before dinner until breakfast and best consumed with two tablespoons of raw organic honey.

          There is also bee propolis, but it is often diluted in alchohol. Other carrier is Propylene glycol.

          Please read:
          https://www.bee-pollen-buzz.com/bee-pollen-dosage.html

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks for letting me know, that sounds pretty cool. Anecdotally, I've heard of a few people who found local honey quite useful for hayfever. I don't know in the broader sense how effective it is on the wider population. I've also heard that some shops sell what they call 'local honey' but if the local area didn't produce enough honey to meet demand, then they mix in a lot of honey that came from elsewhere, so it wouldn't be a true local honey and wouldn't have the same benefits. This is because when a person suffers from hayfever in a particular area, it normally means they are reacting to a certain pollen of a tree or plant that is common in that area so the honey that comes from that particular pollen is the treatment for it, whereas a honey from elsewhere could've been derived from different pollen that came from different flowers and that's why it wouldn't have been effective. That would be my theory as to why some people might have thought they tried a local honey only to find it didn't help. Also it needs to be taken daily for a few weeks before it has an effect- it's not like a drug where you notice a difference on a first or second day.
            The Lyme Disease pandemic: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z5u73ME4sVU

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by neelu
              Thanks for letting me know, that sounds pretty cool. Anecdotally, I've heard of a few people who found local honey quite useful for hayfever. I don't know in the broader sense how effective it is on the wider population. I've also heard that some shops sell what they call 'local honey' but if the local area didn't produce enough honey to meet demand, then they mix in a lot of honey that came from elsewhere, so it wouldn't be a true local honey and wouldn't have the same benefits. This is because when a person suffers from hayfever in a particular area, it normally means they are reacting to a certain pollen of a tree or plant that is common in that area so the honey that comes from that particular pollen is the treatment for it, whereas a honey from elsewhere could've been derived from different pollen that came from different flowers and that's why it wouldn't have been effective. That would be my theory as to why some people might have thought they tried a local honey only to find it didn't help. Also it needs to be taken daily for a few weeks before it has an effect- it's not like a drug where you notice a difference on a first or second day.
              Another interesting thing was some honey they sold had the bees fed on strictly the same flowers by the beekeepers specifically so that honey cost more and then you had some of the cheaper honey where the bees were being fed on different types of flowers etc

              he explained some honey do have stronger taste and some not as much, was interesting tbh @neelu

              Comment


              • #8
                Yes I've heard that about how manuka honey is made. They put the bee hives in the middle of a forest full of manuka so that the bees don't get a chance to feed on other flowers and the honey is exclusively manuka honey, because manuka honey is known to have a lot more medicinal properties than other types so that's how they ensure the bees feed on manuka and not other stuff and it is more expensive than most other honeys.

                I tend to buy sidr honey which is very expensive. Sidr is in the sunnah and apparently it has a lot of good medicinal properties as well. The weird thing is, one site I bought it from it sells "summer harvest" and "winter harvest" sidr honey and there's a big price difference between the two. I'm guessing the winter one is the more medicinal one or something. I've noticed a taste difference as well: the expensive sidr honey has a sort of resiny taste, it doesn't taste like the typical rowse honey you see in the supermarket, whereas the summer sidr honey I've got tastes more like the honey we're used to (more similar to the supermarket brands). I don't know if anyone has an explanation as to why there's such a big difference in taste as well as price due to the seasons. Indeed it is a very interesting topic.
                The Lyme Disease pandemic: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z5u73ME4sVU

                Comment

                Collapse

                Edit this module to specify a template to display.

                Working...
                X