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  1. #1
    الفقير إلى رحمة الله ahaneefah's Avatar
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    Exclamation Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    First Letter from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa):

    26th of Dhu al-Qa'dah, 1430 / 14th of November, 2009

    In the Name of Allah, I praise Allah and invoke peace and blessings on the Messenger of Allah.

    as-Salamu 'alaykum wa Rahmatullah wa Barakatuh;

    First of all, I would like to thank you all from the bottom of my heart for your immense support. Each and every person who is praying for my family and I, who has written a letter, and who attended a hearing or raised general awareness of what is going is known to Allah, and I ask that they each be rewarded with the good of this life and the next, and that Allah relieves each of you of trials and calamities just as you have helped to relieve my own.

    Literally ,there were times when I would be laying in my cell and would begin to feel some distress coming about, and out of nowhere and without doing anything, it would suddenly be washed away, and I would be overcome by a feeling of relaxation and happiness that I cannot describe. I am 100% certain that this is the direct result of the du'a' of some of you. What a wonderful gift...

    I cannot speak in detail about the charges and accusations against me, but suffice to say that nobody who truly knows me would for a second believe the utter lies and sensationalist garbage that has been peddled around in the media since my arrest. I am not the first person the government has played this game with, and I certainly won't be the last. regardless, that's OK because {"Indeed, Allah defends those who believe..."} [Surat al-Hajj; v. 38]. And the Prophets themselves were targets of slander and lies by their opponents. So, who am I to be spared?

    First of all, it is clear that the prison system here is inept. they call this place a 'correctional facility', but I see very little correction of anyone going on around me. Most of the prisoners I've had the chance to speak to are repeat offenders, meaning they were previously jailed here, released, committed more crimes (often the same one), and were brought back. Some have been brought back so many times that they consider this home, and they consider release to be a temporary visit to some strange place. I can't deny that some are beyond hope, but the point is that people are pulled off the streets and brought in here, and nobody makes a single serious effort to get them to change their ways or give them hope of an alternative lifestyle. For example, I was in the prison van yesterday on my way back from court and struck up a conversation with a guy next to me who was losing it. So, I calmed him down, and told him to stay positive, and use his time here to clean his heart and mind, get stronger, and learn more about himself and his purpose in life, and that way he could gain more from prison than he ever would outside. he just looked at me and said: "That's the first time anyone has said something like that to me since I got here," and my words were quite simply and easy...

    There are roughly 1,700 prisoners here. The only rehabilitation programs here take 50 prisoners every four months--combined! So, the remaining 1,650 are being "corrected" by people who for the most part are just here to finish an 8-hour shift and go home without a headache, and couldn't care less about the futures and interests of those they are responsible for. It's a real shame, because the way I see it, a lot of good can be done by just passing each prisoner's cell and sitting down for a short chat to let him know that he can make better choices in life, he should keep his head up, etc. Such simple, brief exchanges can go a long way in changing someone's life, if only this was the purpose of such a facility. Society in general would become much better if this approach were taken by prison staff. If you've ever seen the movie 'American History X', the turn of events there is a good example of how this can come about.

    Another concept that has been reinforced in my mind is tha tno matter how bad things may be going for a given person, there is always someone worse off. There is always that one person you meet who gives you a reality check that reminds you that even though you are in prison going through hardship, etc., there are still things that you can take for granted. Case in point: a fellow prisoner I learned of who was just moved into the isolation unit a few cells down from me, who I had a chance to speak to when he was being moved. He told me his story, and I asked him how often he called his family, to which he replied that his mother literally told him to never contact her again until he was out. He was nearly in tears--a grown man--while questioning how a mother can turn away from her son in such a manner at his greatest time of need. After, I spoke to him, I tried to put myself in his shoes, and I came to realize that despite whatever I'm going through, I never once had to worry about my family forsaking me or abandoning me. In our culture, it's generally unfathomable. However, it is these reality checks that clarify that what might be guaranteed for some isn't guaranteed for all, and we should thus realize at all times that no matter how bad you may have it, you have things that grown men will cry for. So, thanks and praise to Allah for giving us what we have.

    Another example that just popped into my mind is something I read in the newspaper today. It was about a woman who had been attacked by a chimpanzee weighing 200 lbs coming on TV and showing what the chimp had done to her face: her eyes were so severely attacked that she is now blind. A flap of skin now sits where her nose used to be. Her cheeks are a series of tears, gashes, and scars. She is unrecognizable, and can only eat through a straw. I just read that, shook my head, and realized that something as basic as having an intact face, having a nose, being able to see--these were luxuries I have that this woman is now deprived of.

    Another benefit of being here is that you come to realize that the Muslim's relationship with Allah is one of give and take, and good and desirable things don't come easy. If you want something valuable, you have to be able to come up with money for it. We sometimes will wish for something, make du'a' that it comes to be, have high hopes, but our level of faith, worship, and attachment to Allah isn't changed at all, because we don't tend to these while making the du'a' for what we want. As a result, we don't achieve the desired outcome. In the Hadith Qudsi, Allah says: "Whoever shows hostility to a Wali of Mine, I will declare war on him." So, we often pay attention to the entire sentence except for the 'Wali' part, as well as what comes next. A person reaches this level of closeness to Allah by performing so many nawafil (extra) deeds--praying more, fasting more, giving more charity--that Allah becomes his hearing, seeing, etc. Instead of just praying his normal twelve extra rak'at, he prays twenty. Instead of praying a third of the night, he boosts it up to half the night. He makes his sujud longer. He reads two azja' a day instead of his regular one juz! he fasts four days a week instead of two. He makes his way through a series of adhkar that is twice as long as what he would normally do--basically, he puts in more of his time and energy to worship Allah, and shows Him that he truly wants to become close to Him, truly wants His wilayah, truly loves Him, truly sees himself as a slave who is broken, humbled, weak, and is simply manifesting the reason he exists. Such a person wants to dig deeper into the treasures of faith, worship, and attachment to Allah. He knows that attachment to Allah is of levels, and he doesn't rest and is not satisfied with himself until he reaches the highest level that he can of this attachment. Only then can we complete the hadith and say: "if he asks Me, I will give him what he wants, and if he asks for My Protection, I will Protect him."

    Reaching this level isn't easy. It takes sincerity, persistence, resolve, conviction, true certainty that Allah will give you what you want if you reach the finish line, and it requires consistency. We can't be like the people Allah describes in verse 12 and verses 22--23 in Surat Yunus, who reach this level of humility and need before Allah, get the relief we want, and then go back to the way we were before we needed relief from Him.

    The point is that the deeper you go in these levels of servitude to Allah, the more evident and swift your need will be met. The level of certainty Prophet Musa had standing before the Red Sea splitting, the level of humility and need Yunus felt when he was released form the whale's grasp, the lengthy du'a' the Prophet Muhammad made before the Battle of Badr--all of these are examples of a deep level of attachment to Allah that went beyond what would exist on a daily basis while we're living in comfort, ease, and security, and this is part of the reason the response to their distress was quite literally miraculous. We can achieve the same to some extent if we reach deep enough into those treasures. And we can do that now, whether or not we are in dire need of something from Allah at the moment. And we are all in need of Him...

    These are just a few of the thoughts that have occupied my mind lately. I would like to close this letter by mentioning an incident with Babar Ahmad that I have heard shortly before I was arrested. In it, he says that a fellow prisoner was about to be released. So, Babar said: 'I want to apologize to you before you leave." The man asked: "For what?" Babar replied: "When I was free, I saw your story on TV. However, it meant nothing to me, because I never thought it could happen to me. So, I did nothing for you. Now that I am in prison and it has happened to me, there are people who heard about my story and will think nothing of it, thinking it will never happen to them. Once it happens to them, others will think nothing of it and do nothing, etc..." So, if you feel that you can just sit back and read about all these cases and do nothing to repel this injustice and that it can never happen to you, think again.

    Was-Salamu'alaykum wa Rahmatullah wa Barakatuh.

    Your brother,

    Tariq Mehanna

  2. #201
    الفقير إلى رحمة الله ahaneefah's Avatar
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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    Br. Tarek's speech:

    In the name of God the most gracious the most merciful

    Exactly four years ago this month I was finishing my work shift at a local hospital. As I was walking to my car I was approached by two federal agents. They said that I had a choice to make: I could do things the easy way, or I could do them the hard way. The “easy “ way, as they explained, was that I would become an informant for the government, and if I did so I would never see the inside of a courtroom or a prison cell. As for the hard way, this is it. Here I am, having spent the majority of the four years since then in a solitary cell the size of a small closet, in which I am locked down for 23 hours each day. The FBI and these prosecutors worked very hard—and the government spent millions of tax dollars – to put me in that cell, keep me there, put me on trial, and finally to have me stand here before you today to be sentenced to even more time in a cell.

    In the weeks leading up to this moment, many people have offered suggestions as to what I should say to you. Some said I should plead for mercy in hopes of a light sentence, while others suggested I would be hit hard either way. But what I want to do is just talk about myself for a few minutes.

    When I refused to become an informant, the government responded by charging me with the “crime” of supporting the mujahideen fighting the occupation of Muslim countries around the world. Or as they like to call them, “terrorists.” I wasn’t born in a Muslim country, though. I was born and raised right here in America and this angers many people: how is it that I can be an American and believe the things I believe, take the positions I take? Everything a man is exposed to in his environment becomes an ingredient that shapes his outlook, and I’m no different. So, in more ways than one, it’s because of America that I am who I am.

    When I was six, I began putting together a massive collection of comic books. Batman implanted a concept in my mind, introduced me to a paradigm as to how the world is set up: that there are oppressors, there are the oppressed, and there are those who step up to defend the oppressed. This resonated with me so much that throughout the rest of my childhood, I gravitated towards any book that reflected that paradigm – Uncle Tom’s Cabin, The Autobiography of Malcolm X, and I even saw an ethical dimension to The Catcher in the Rye.

    By the time I began high school and took a real history class, I was learning just how real that paradigm is in the world. I learned about the Native Americans and what befell them at the hands of European settlers. I learned about how the descendents of those European settlers were in turn oppressed under the tyranny of King George III. I read about Paul Revere, Tom Paine, and how Americans began an armed insurgency against British forces – an insurgency we now celebrate as the American revolutionary war. As a kid I even went on school field trips just blocks away from where we sit now. I learned about Harriet Tubman, Nat Turner, John Brown, and the fight against slavery in this country. I learned about Emma Goldman, Eugene Debs, and the struggles of the labor unions, working class, and poor. I learned about Anne Frank, the Nazis, and how they persecuted minorities and imprisoned dissidents. I learned about Rosa Parks, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, and the civil rights struggle. I learned about Ho Chi Minh, and how the Vietnamese fought for decades to liberate themselves from one invader after another. I learned about Nelson Mandela and the fight against apartheid in South Africa. Everything I learned in those years confirmed what I was beginning to learn when I was six: that throughout history, there has been a constant struggle between the oppressed and their oppressors. With each struggle I learned about, I found myself consistently siding with the oppressed, and consistently respecting those who stepped up to defend them -regardless of nationality, regardless of religion. And I never threw my class notes away. As I stand here speaking, they are in a neat pile in my bedroom closet at home.

    From all the historical figures I learned about, one stood out above the rest. I was impressed by many things about Malcolm X, but above all, I was fascinated by the idea of transformation, his transformation. I don’t know if you’ve seen the movie “X” by Spike Lee, it’s over three and a half hours long, and the Malcolm at the beginning is different from the Malcolm at the end. He starts off as an illiterate criminal, but ends up a husband, a father, a protective and eloquent leader for his people, a disciplined Muslim performing the Hajj in Makkah, and finally, a martyr. Malcolm’s life taught me that Islam is not something inherited; it’s not a culture or ethnicity. It’s a way of life, a state of mind anyone can choose no matter where they come from or how they were raised. This led me to look deeper into Islam, and I was hooked. I was just a teenager, but Islam answered the question that the greatest scientific minds were clueless about, the question that drives the rich & famous to depression and suicide from being unable to answer: what is the purpose of life? Why do we exist in this Universe? But it also answered the question of how we’re supposed to exist. And since there’s no hierarchy or priesthood, I could directly and immediately begin digging into the texts of the Qur’an and the teachings of Prophet Muhammad, to begin the journey of understanding what this was all about, the implications of Islam for me as a human being, as an individual, for the people around me, for the world; and the more I learned, the more I valued Islam like a piece of gold. This was when I was a teen, but even today, despite the pressures of the last few years, I stand here before you, and everyone else in this courtroom, as a very proud Muslim.

    With that, my attention turned to what was happening to other Muslims in different parts of the world. And everywhere I looked, I saw the powers that be trying to destroy what I loved. I learned what the Soviets had done to the Muslims of Afghanistan. I learned what the Serbs had done to the Muslims of Bosnia. I learned what the Russians were doing to the Muslims of Chechnya. I learned what Israel had done in Lebanon – and what it continues to do in Palestine – with the full backing of the United States. And I learned what America itself was doing to Muslims. I learned about the Gulf War, and the depleted uranium bombs that killed thousands and caused cancer rates to skyrocket across Iraq. I learned about the American-led sanctions that prevented food, medicine, and medical equipment from entering Iraq, and how –according to the United Nations – over half a million children perished as a result. I remember a clip from a ‘60 Minutes’ interview of Madeline Albright where she expressed her view that these dead children were “worth it.” I watched on September 11 th as a group of people felt driven to hijack airplanes and fly them into buildings from their outrage at the deaths of these children. I watched as America then attacked and invaded Iraq directly. I saw the effects of ‘Shock & Awe’ in the opening day of the invasion – the children in hospital wards with shrapnel from American missiles sticking out of their foreheads (of course, none of this was shown on CNN). I learned about the town of Haditha, where 24 Muslims – including a 76-year old man in a wheelchair, women, and even toddlers –were shot up and blown up in their bedclothes as the slept by US Marines. I learned about Abeer al-Janabi, a fourteen-year old Iraqi girl gang-raped by five American soldiers, who then shot her and her family in the head, then set fire to their corpses. I just want to point out, as you can see, Muslim women don’t even show their hair to unrelated men. So try to imagine this young girl from a conservative village with her dress torn off, being sexually assaulted by not one, not two, not three, not four, but five soldiers. Even today, as I sit in my jail cell, I read about the drone strikes which continue to kill Muslims daily in places like Pakistan, Somalia, and Yemen. Just last month, we all heard about the seventeen Afghan Muslims – mostly mothers and their kids – shot to death by an American soldier, who also set fire to their corpses. These are just the stories that make it to the headlines, but one of the first concepts I learned in Islam is that of loyalty, of brotherhood – that each Muslim woman is my sister, each man is my brother, and together, we are one large body who must protect each other. In other words, I couldn’t see these things beings done to my brothers & sisters –including by America – and remain neutral. My sympathy for the oppressed continued, but was now more personal, as was my respect for those defending them.

    I mentioned Paul Revere – when he went on his midnight ride, it was for the purpose of warning the people that the British were marching to Lexington to arrest Sam Adams and John Hancock, then on to Concord to confiscate the weapons stored there by the Minuteman. By the time they got to Concord, they found the Minuteman waiting for them, weapons in hand. They fired at the British, fought them, and beat them. From that battle came the American Revolution. There’s an Arabic word to describe what those Minutemen did that day. That word is: JIHAD, and this is what my trial was about. All those videos and translations and childish bickering over ‘Oh, he translated this paragraph’ and ‘Oh, he edited that sentence,’ and all those exhibits revolved around a single issue: Muslims who were defending themselves against American soldiers doing to them exactly what the British did to America. It was made crystal clear at trial that I never, ever plotted to “kill Americans” at shopping malls or whatever the story was. The government’s own witnesses contradicted this claim, and we put expert after expert up on that stand, who spent hours dissecting my every written word, who explained my beliefs. Further, when I was free, the government sent an undercover agent to prod me into one of their little “terror plots,” but I refused to participate. Mysteriously, however, the jury never heard this.

    So, this trial was not about my position on Muslims killing American civilians. It was about my position on Americans killing Muslim civilians, which is that Muslims should defend their lands from foreign invaders – Soviets, Americans, or Martians. This is what I believe. It’s what I’ve always believed, and what I will always believe. This is not terrorism, and it’s not extremism. It’s what the arrows on that seal above your head represent: defense of the homeland. So, I disagree with my lawyers when they say that you don’t have to agree with my beliefs – no. Anyone with commonsense and humanity has no choice but to agree with me. If someone breaks into your home to rob you and harm your family, logic dictates that you do whatever it takes to expel that invader from your home. But when that home is a Muslim land, and that invader is the US military, for some reason the standards suddenly change. Common sense is renamed “terrorism” and the people defending themselves against those who come to kill them from across the ocean become “the terrorists” who are “killing Americans.” The mentality that America was victimized with when British soldiers walked these streets 2 ½ centuries ago is the same mentality Muslims are victimized by as American soldiers walk their streets today. It’s the mentality of colonialism. When Sgt. Bales shot those Afghans to death last month, all of the focus in the media was on him—his life, his stress, his PTSD, the mortgage on his home—as if he was the victim. Very little sympathy was expressed for the people he actually killed, as if they’re not real, they’re not humans. Unfortunately, this mentality trickles down to everyone in society, whether or not they realize it. Even with my lawyers, it took nearly two years of discussing, explaining, and clarifying before they were finally able to think outside the box and at least ostensibly accept the logic in what I was saying. Two years! If it took that long for people so intelligent, whose job it is to defend me, to de-program themselves, then to throw me in front of a randomly selected jury under the premise that they’re my “impartial peers,” I mean, come on. I wasn’t tried before a jury of my peers because with the mentality gripping America today, I have no peers. Counting on this fact, the government prosecuted me – not because they needed to, but simply because they could.

    I learned one more thing in history class: America has historically supported the most unjust policies against its minorities – practices that were even protected by the law – only to look back later and ask: ‘what were we thinking?’ Slavery, Jim Crow, the internment of the Japanese during World War II – each was widely accepted by American society, each was defended by the Supreme Court. But as time passed and America changed, both people and courts looked back and asked ‘What were we thinking?’ Nelson Mandela was considered a terrorist by the South African government, and given a life sentence. But time passed, the world changed, they realized how oppressive their policies were, that it was not he who was the terrorist, and they released him from prison. He even became president. So, everything is subjective – even this whole business of “terrorism” and who is a “terrorist.” It all depends on the time and place and who the superpower happens to be at the moment.

    In your eyes, I’m a terrorist, and it’s perfectly reasonable that I be standing here in an orange jumpsuit. But one day, America will change and people will recognize this day for what it is. They will look at how hundreds of thousands of Muslims were killed and maimed by the US military in foreign countries, yet somehow I’m the one going to prison for “conspiring to kill and maim” in those countries – because I support the Mujahidin defending those people. They will look back on how the government spent millions of dollars to imprison me as a “terrorist,” yet if we were to somehow bring Abeer al-Janabi back to life in the moment she was being gang-raped by your soldiers, to put her on that witness stand and ask her who the “terrorists” are, she sure wouldn’t be pointing at me. The government says that I was obsessed with violence, obsessed with “killing Americans.” But, as a Muslim living in these times, I can think of a lie no more ironic.

    -Tarek Mehanna 4/12/12

  3. #202
    أنا مسلم AbuMubarak's Avatar
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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    i can think of no one that i am more proud of than our brother on this day, he has shown the patience and conviction that every muslim should show
    .لا نريد زعيما يخاف البيت الإبيض
    نريد زعيما يخاف الواحد الأحد
    دولة الإسلامية باقية






  4. #203

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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    Indeed, Subhanallah.

    He puts us to shame and should be an example for the shabaab. may Allah reward him immensely and hasten his release.

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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    Those last few paragraphs... one has to wonder what is in the minds of people that they don't spot the things Tarek Mehanna notices in such an abundant supply. I agree, one day, we'll look back on history and wonder how the hell we got it so wrong; like history shows us humans end up doing again and again.
    Ya Muqallib al-Quloob, thabbit qalbi 'alaa Deenik
    O' Converter of Hearts, make my heart steadfast upon Thy Way
    We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.

  6. #205
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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    It brought tears to my eyes. May Allah hasten the release of all Muslim prisoners, ameen.

  7. #206
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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    I just read up on Brother Tarek's story and came in to share the above.

    May Allah reward him.

    its truly sad, I don't get teared up as i thought my heart has turned to solid rock but I am truly glad it is not...

  8. #207
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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    Quote Originally Posted by ahaneefah View Post
    Br. Tarek's speech:
    Magnificent.
    May Allah reward him immensely and forgive all his sins and elevate him to the highest ranks of Jannah. Ameen.

    I don't want to spoil the mood of this topic, but look at what those pieces of human trash over at the Daily Mail have as their headline regarding the brother "Al Qaeda Terrorist" they call him...and the comments section lets not even get started on that.

  9. #208
    ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥♥ ♥ ♥ ♥♥ ♥ ♥ ♥♥ ♥
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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    Truly beautiful speech.. May Allah 'azza wa jal give our brother Tariq and all those in the same position and indeed all those whom are opressed, the most beautiful of patience and enduring strength. Aameen

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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    Br Tarek's drawing (2 years ago) sums up his sentencing statement:


  11. #210
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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    Amazing:


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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    I've seen alotta non Muslims also praising the speech he gave, though there seems to be a lively debate over the actual reason why he got jailed.

    May Allah elevate his status in Jannah and grant him & his family sabr and hasten his release.

  13. #212
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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    The Real Deal on the NYPD Informant - Tariq Mehanna


    My arrest and trial had little to do with “terrorism.” The overwhelming majority of “terrorism” cases in America can fit into a category in which the FBI picks the gullible Muslim youth, sends an undercover agent to “befriend” him, and over a period of time, prod him to agree to carry out some attack. The agreement is recorded on tape. The undercover FBI agent offers the kid weapons, and arrests him as soon as he is about to proceed with the so-called “plot.” While the intended impression is that the Feds swooped in to save the day, the reality is that they “foiled” their own plot. An artificial victory, and this is the formula which you see every other day when you read the news, whose purpose is to compensate for the lack of authentic “terror plots.”

    The government attempted this strategy with me, but failed. This has been one of the most underreported aspects of my case, despite it being in the public record. This is what happened:

    In late 2005, I was approached by an individual whom I’d never met. Over the course of two years, he attempted to befriend me, and gradually began shifting otherwise mundane conversations to suggesting the need to “do something.” Eventually, this “something” that he was hounding me to “do” emerged as a plan of his to find American soldiers returning from Iraq (whose addresses he supposedly had) and kill them. He would show up at my house uninvited, and always try to steer the conversation in this directions, and I would steer it away and bury it, but he would never give up. Finally, I told this individual to never contact me again.

    Two years later, I found myself here in a Plymouth jail awaiting trial on terrorism charges. From day one, I related this to my lawyers, and that I was 100% sure this had been an attempt by the FBI to entrap me in one of their artificial “plots” so that they could have additional firepower in this case. But my lawyers explained that without some acknowledgement from the government, it would be impossible to prove. So we filed numerous motions over the course of the two years before trial requesting exculpatory evidence (i.e., evidence that would be in my favor) from the government regarding this, but they feigned ignorance, and said that they had nothing.

    Finally, in the early summer of 2011, my lawyer, Jay Carney, got a call from an Associated Press reporter who said that two sources within the NYPD had contacted her and confirmed to her that the NYPD had sent an undercover agent up to Boston to “befriend” me, and try to prod me into carrying out a “terrorist attack,” and that I had refused to go along (bingo!). Furthermore, these sources in the NYPD told this journalist that when the prosecutors in my case found out about this – the same prosecutors at my trial, Aloke Chakravarty and Jeffrey Auerhahn – they became frantic and called the NYPD to come up to Boston for a meeting, where they admonished them for “interfering” in my case. With this information, my lawyers filed an additional motion asking the judge to compel the government to disclose these details so that they could be mentioned at trial – the logic being that this is a “terrorism” trial, and here was an attempt by the government to actually push me to carry out an act of “terrorism,” and I had refused, and they were trying to cover this up. The motion was filed on July 15 th , 2011.

    A hearing took place in court on August 3 rd , 2011 to discuss this. A number of other motions were discussed first, then at the end, Jay got up to argue this one. He mentioned to the judge tat we were seeking exculpatory evidence from the government, as they had thus far given us none. And then he mentioned that from the items we sought were details of an attempt by the NYPD to prod me to engage in a domestic attack, which I refused, etc. This was apparently the first the prosecutors knew that we were privy to this, and the surprise was evident on their faces. The judge asked them if they knew anything about this, and Mr. Chakravarty’s response was an ambiguous “we have no information from our office on this, and it is the defendant who should know,” to which Jay stood up again, faced Mr. Chakravarty, and asked: “So you’re willing to say, on record, before the court, that no members of the NYPD came up to Boston at anytime to meet with you to discuss an attempt to prod Tarek Mehanna to engage in an act of terrorism that he refused to go along with?” The prosecutor’s response, verbatim, was: “Well, I didn’t say that either…”

    O’Toole said he would wait to rule on the motion, and immediately, the prosecutors requested a private meeting with him in the judge’s chambers. He granted their request. My lawyers stood outside the judge’s door as the prosecutors walked in and protested: “Well, that’s not fair. How are you going to meet with the judge privately about this motion, and we have no idea what is being said?” But the judge met with them for almost 20 minutes. We will never know what was said in that meeting, but the next morning, O’Toole denied our motion, and that was the last anyone had ever heard of it: nothing about this topic was allowed to be mentioned to the jury at trial. Not a single word.

    A brief mention of the motion and the hearing was made in an August 2th 2011 article in the Boston Globe, written by Milton Valencia. But the article was published before O’Toole had officially denied the motion. This was the only media attention that this incident received.

    Conversely, the baseless “shopping mall plot” received the lion’s share of media attention, and was freely introduced at trial by the government. The progression of this particular story is interesting, and quite telling as to how dishonest the government is: -October 21 st , 2009: I’m introduced to the world as having plotted to gun down shoppers at a local mall. -10/21/09 to 10/24/11: The two year period before my trial: not a single additional detail is presented about this.

    -My trial: Not only was no evidence presented to support this, but the government’s own witnesses admitted that I never participated in any such discussions, and that I in fact spoke against such ideas.

    -Closing arguments at trial: The prosecutor backtracks, and says that even if these were not my ideas, that I knew people who had these ideas was enough.

    In the end, you’re damned if you do, damned if you don’t. At this point, it should be clear that my trial was about many things, but it was not about “terrorism.”

    (To be continued…)

    - Tariq Mehanna

  14. #213
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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    i read it on another forum, and i didn't have the words to express what i felt..i read it again now and i still feel the same way, subhanAllah

    ameen @ ad'iyah

    Quote Originally Posted by ahaneefah View Post
    Br. Tarek's speech:
    "We have a a history to be proud of and a future to believe in.."

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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    May Allah swt free our brother in deen, and grant him Firdaus al aala. Ameen, Thumma Ameen.

    I don't get this comment though (below). What does this mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by MWarrior View Post
    Inna lillahi wa inna ilaihi raji'oon

    Carry on preaching nonsense ... Yes am talking to you al maghrib, waleed basyouni, yes sir qadhi and all the other 'jokers' in the 'great USA'.

    It's sad, people (generally speaking) still can't see this blatant war against Islam that is going on out there. I think we will only wake up in the hereafter, when it's too late.

    may Allah guide us all.

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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    This is a leaked audio of brother Tariq's sentencing statement in court. It was contributed by an anonymous/unknown supporter!

    https://rapidshare.com/#!download|57...62B8E22B68|0|0

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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    Heard it earlier today. BarakAllah feek for putting it here.

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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    You can subscribe to latest updates from the main website - via email:
    http://www.freetarek.com/

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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    Quote Originally Posted by ahaneefah View Post
    Br. Tarek's speech:
    This speech is so moving. Everybody should read it.


    In the name of God the most gracious the most merciful

    Exactly four years ago this month I was finishing my work shift at a local hospital. As I was walking to my car I was approached by two federal agents. They said that I had a choice to make: I could do things the easy way, or I could do them the hard way. The “easy “ way, as they explained, was that I would become an informant for the government, and if I did so I would never see the inside of a courtroom or a prison cell. As for the hard way, this is it. Here I am, having spent the majority of the four years since then in a solitary cell the size of a small closet, in which I am locked down for 23 hours each day. The FBI and these prosecutors worked very hard—and the government spent millions of tax dollars – to put me in that cell, keep me there, put me on trial, and finally to have me stand here before you today to be sentenced to even more time in a cell.

    In the weeks leading up to this moment, many people have offered suggestions as to what I should say to you. Some said I should plead for mercy in hopes of a light sentence, while others suggested I would be hit hard either way. But what I want to do is just talk about myself for a few minutes.

    When I refused to become an informant, the government responded by charging me with the “crime” of supporting the mujahideen fighting the occupation of Muslim countries around the world. Or as they like to call them, “terrorists.” I wasn’t born in a Muslim country, though. I was born and raised right here in America and this angers many people: how is it that I can be an American and believe the things I believe, take the positions I take? Everything a man is exposed to in his environment becomes an ingredient that shapes his outlook, and I’m no different. So, in more ways than one, it’s because of America that I am who I am.

    When I was six, I began putting together a massive collection of comic books. Batman implanted a concept in my mind, introduced me to a paradigm as to how the world is set up: that there are oppressors, there are the oppressed, and there are those who step up to defend the oppressed. This resonated with me so much that throughout the rest of my childhood, I gravitated towards any book that reflected that paradigm – Uncle Tom’s Cabin, The Autobiography of Malcolm X, and I even saw an ethical dimension to The Catcher in the Rye.

    By the time I began high school and took a real history class, I was learning just how real that paradigm is in the world. I learned about the Native Americans and what befell them at the hands of European settlers. I learned about how the descendents of those European settlers were in turn oppressed under the tyranny of King George III. I read about Paul Revere, Tom Paine, and how Americans began an armed insurgency against British forces – an insurgency we now celebrate as the American revolutionary war. As a kid I even went on school field trips just blocks away from where we sit now. I learned about Harriet Tubman, Nat Turner, John Brown, and the fight against slavery in this country. I learned about Emma Goldman, Eugene Debs, and the struggles of the labor unions, working class, and poor. I learned about Anne Frank, the Nazis, and how they persecuted minorities and imprisoned dissidents. I learned about Rosa Parks, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, and the civil rights struggle. I learned about Ho Chi Minh, and how the Vietnamese fought for decades to liberate themselves from one invader after another. I learned about Nelson Mandela and the fight against apartheid in South Africa. Everything I learned in those years confirmed what I was beginning to learn when I was six: that throughout history, there has been a constant struggle between the oppressed and their oppressors. With each struggle I learned about, I found myself consistently siding with the oppressed, and consistently respecting those who stepped up to defend them -regardless of nationality, regardless of religion. And I never threw my class notes away. As I stand here speaking, they are in a neat pile in my bedroom closet at home.

    From all the historical figures I learned about, one stood out above the rest. I was impressed by many things about Malcolm X, but above all, I was fascinated by the idea of transformation, his transformation. I don’t know if you’ve seen the movie “X” by Spike Lee, it’s over three and a half hours long, and the Malcolm at the beginning is different from the Malcolm at the end. He starts off as an illiterate criminal, but ends up a husband, a father, a protective and eloquent leader for his people, a disciplined Muslim performing the Hajj in Makkah, and finally, a martyr. Malcolm’s life taught me that Islam is not something inherited; it’s not a culture or ethnicity. It’s a way of life, a state of mind anyone can choose no matter where they come from or how they were raised. This led me to look deeper into Islam, and I was hooked. I was just a teenager, but Islam answered the question that the greatest scientific minds were clueless about, the question that drives the rich & famous to depression and suicide from being unable to answer: what is the purpose of life? Why do we exist in this Universe? But it also answered the question of how we’re supposed to exist. And since there’s no hierarchy or priesthood, I could directly and immediately begin digging into the texts of the Qur’an and the teachings of Prophet Muhammad, to begin the journey of understanding what this was all about, the implications of Islam for me as a human being, as an individual, for the people around me, for the world; and the more I learned, the more I valued Islam like a piece of gold. This was when I was a teen, but even today, despite the pressures of the last few years, I stand here before you, and everyone else in this courtroom, as a very proud Muslim.

    With that, my attention turned to what was happening to other Muslims in different parts of the world. And everywhere I looked, I saw the powers that be trying to destroy what I loved. I learned what the Soviets had done to the Muslims of Afghanistan. I learned what the Serbs had done to the Muslims of Bosnia. I learned what the Russians were doing to the Muslims of Chechnya. I learned what Israel had done in Lebanon – and what it continues to do in Palestine – with the full backing of the United States. And I learned what America itself was doing to Muslims. I learned about the Gulf War, and the depleted uranium bombs that killed thousands and caused cancer rates to skyrocket across Iraq. I learned about the American-led sanctions that prevented food, medicine, and medical equipment from entering Iraq, and how –according to the United Nations – over half a million children perished as a result. I remember a clip from a ‘60 Minutes’ interview of Madeline Albright where she expressed her view that these dead children were “worth it.” I watched on September 11 th as a group of people felt driven to hijack airplanes and fly them into buildings from their outrage at the deaths of these children. I watched as America then attacked and invaded Iraq directly. I saw the effects of ‘Shock & Awe’ in the opening day of the invasion – the children in hospital wards with shrapnel from American missiles sticking out of their foreheads (of course, none of this was shown on CNN). I learned about the town of Haditha, where 24 Muslims – including a 76-year old man in a wheelchair, women, and even toddlers –were shot up and blown up in their bedclothes as the slept by US Marines. I learned about Abeer al-Janabi, a fourteen-year old Iraqi girl gang-raped by five American soldiers, who then shot her and her family in the head, then set fire to their corpses. I just want to point out, as you can see, Muslim women don’t even show their hair to unrelated men. So try to imagine this young girl from a conservative village with her dress torn off, being sexually assaulted by not one, not two, not three, not four, but five soldiers. Even today, as I sit in my jail cell, I read about the drone strikes which continue to kill Muslims daily in places like Pakistan, Somalia, and Yemen. Just last month, we all heard about the seventeen Afghan Muslims – mostly mothers and their kids – shot to death by an American soldier, who also set fire to their corpses. These are just the stories that make it to the headlines, but one of the first concepts I learned in Islam is that of loyalty, of brotherhood – that each Muslim woman is my sister, each man is my brother, and together, we are one large body who must protect each other. In other words, I couldn’t see these things beings done to my brothers & sisters –including by America – and remain neutral. My sympathy for the oppressed continued, but was now more personal, as was my respect for those defending them.

    I mentioned Paul Revere – when he went on his midnight ride, it was for the purpose of warning the people that the British were marching to Lexington to arrest Sam Adams and John Hancock, then on to Concord to confiscate the weapons stored there by the Minuteman. By the time they got to Concord, they found the Minuteman waiting for them, weapons in hand. They fired at the British, fought them, and beat them. From that battle came the American Revolution. There’s an Arabic word to describe what those Minutemen did that day. That word is: JIHAD, and this is what my trial was about. All those videos and translations and childish bickering over ‘Oh, he translated this paragraph’ and ‘Oh, he edited that sentence,’ and all those exhibits revolved around a single issue: Muslims who were defending themselves against American soldiers doing to them exactly what the British did to America. It was made crystal clear at trial that I never, ever plotted to “kill Americans” at shopping malls or whatever the story was. The government’s own witnesses contradicted this claim, and we put expert after expert up on that stand, who spent hours dissecting my every written word, who explained my beliefs. Further, when I was free, the government sent an undercover agent to prod me into one of their little “terror plots,” but I refused to participate. Mysteriously, however, the jury never heard this.

    So, this trial was not about my position on Muslims killing American civilians. It was about my position on Americans killing Muslim civilians, which is that Muslims should defend their lands from foreign invaders – Soviets, Americans, or Martians. This is what I believe. It’s what I’ve always believed, and what I will always believe. This is not terrorism, and it’s not extremism. It’s what the arrows on that seal above your head represent: defense of the homeland. So, I disagree with my lawyers when they say that you don’t have to agree with my beliefs – no. Anyone with commonsense and humanity has no choice but to agree with me. If someone breaks into your home to rob you and harm your family, logic dictates that you do whatever it takes to expel that invader from your home. But when that home is a Muslim land, and that invader is the US military, for some reason the standards suddenly change. Common sense is renamed “terrorism” and the people defending themselves against those who come to kill them from across the ocean become “the terrorists” who are “killing Americans.” The mentality that America was victimized with when British soldiers walked these streets 2 ½ centuries ago is the same mentality Muslims are victimized by as American soldiers walk their streets today. It’s the mentality of colonialism. When Sgt. Bales shot those Afghans to death last month, all of the focus in the media was on him—his life, his stress, his PTSD, the mortgage on his home—as if he was the victim. Very little sympathy was expressed for the people he actually killed, as if they’re not real, they’re not humans. Unfortunately, this mentality trickles down to everyone in society, whether or not they realize it. Even with my lawyers, it took nearly two years of discussing, explaining, and clarifying before they were finally able to think outside the box and at least ostensibly accept the logic in what I was saying. Two years! If it took that long for people so intelligent, whose job it is to defend me, to de-program themselves, then to throw me in front of a randomly selected jury under the premise that they’re my “impartial peers,” I mean, come on. I wasn’t tried before a jury of my peers because with the mentality gripping America today, I have no peers. Counting on this fact, the government prosecuted me – not because they needed to, but simply because they could.

    I learned one more thing in history class: America has historically supported the most unjust policies against its minorities – practices that were even protected by the law – only to look back later and ask: ‘what were we thinking?’ Slavery, Jim Crow, the internment of the Japanese during World War II – each was widely accepted by American society, each was defended by the Supreme Court. But as time passed and America changed, both people and courts looked back and asked ‘What were we thinking?’ Nelson Mandela was considered a terrorist by the South African government, and given a life sentence. But time passed, the world changed, they realized how oppressive their policies were, that it was not he who was the terrorist, and they released him from prison. He even became president. So, everything is subjective – even this whole business of “terrorism” and who is a “terrorist.” It all depends on the time and place and who the superpower happens to be at the moment.

    In your eyes, I’m a terrorist, and it’s perfectly reasonable that I be standing here in an orange jumpsuit. But one day, America will change and people will recognize this day for what it is. They will look at how hundreds of thousands of Muslims were killed and maimed by the US military in foreign countries, yet somehow I’m the one going to prison for “conspiring to kill and maim” in those countries – because I support the Mujahidin defending those people. They will look back on how the government spent millions of dollars to imprison me as a “terrorist,” yet if we were to somehow bring Abeer al-Janabi back to life in the moment she was being gang-raped by your soldiers, to put her on that witness stand and ask her who the “terrorists” are, she sure wouldn’t be pointing at me. The government says that I was obsessed with violence, obsessed with “killing Americans.” But, as a Muslim living in these times, I can think of a lie no more ironic.

    -Tarek Mehanna 4/12/12
    "Woe be to the ignorant person once for not learning. Woe be to the scholar a thousand times for not practicing." - Al-Ghazali

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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    A poem by brother Tarek:
    “From Within a Hostile Land”

    In the Name of God…
    Halfway around the planet from the holy desert sands,
    Upon which God’s final Prophet built with his hands,
    A refuge for the believers, a Madinah so grand,
    I grant you these words from within a hostile land,
    To get you to understand that it was planned,
    To imprison a small band,
    Of young men upon the Truth who found their understanding outlawed and banned,
    Remanded to the custody of injustice’s American brand,
    Branded for life because of a way of life passed down from Negroes of sand,
    Slave masters and house Negroes conspiring to stop a force unstoppable,
    Inhospitable to the proposals of RAND,
    I am hostile,
    To any who would revile,
    The Truth even if they smile,
    In my face all the while,
    Yes, I live my life by the Book,
    So, don’t give me that look,
    You crooks,
    It is you who took,
    From humanity its freedom to let its soul fly,
    To its sole Creator,
    In Whose eyes this capitalistic, materialistic prison of a world isn’t worth the wing of a fly,
    So, we wait in this prison like knights without horses,
    Weeping on the nights that we recite His verses,
    Or hear it,
    Serious and bearded,
    No one had to force us,
    We just read ancient texts and decided to join forces,
    With the Prophet and his Companions,
    To accompany their fight,
    To become companions of the Right,
    Right to Heaven we hope to go and avoid Hellfire’s fright,
    To Hell with the enemies who frighten us with shackles and chains,
    Who go to great pains to keep us in pain,
    All in vain,
    Because our veins flow with blood,
    That is worth less to us than the Pleasure of the Lord who created them from mud,
    Their tears flow: “Why? Why won’t he submit to our manmade gods?” they furiously ask,
    As I throw mud in their faces, lean back, and laugh…
    By: Tariq Mehanna

    Tuesday, 5th of Ramadan 1433/ 24th of July 2012

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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    Masha-Allah! May Allah increase our brother in Sabr and grant him freedom
    The Prophet said: "The fear of people should never prevent any of you from speaking the truth when he sees it or pointing out its importance. Doing so will not hasten one's appointed time of death or lessen one's rizq."Tirmidhi, Hasanussaheeh
    He also said: ”If you see my ummah afraid to confront an oppressor and tell him - "You are an oppressor", then it is finished.Ahmad, Saheeh

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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    Recent photo of Tariq in his cell at the Terre Haute CMU, taken this past Ramadan:



    May Allah hasten his release. Ameen

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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    Tariq Mehanna: The Happiest People on Earth'

    Today is the day of 'Arafah.

    The Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) said: "The greatest supplication is the supplication of the day of 'Arafah, and the best thing I and the Prophets before me ever said is 'la ilaha ill Allah, Wahdahu la sharika lah, lahu al-mulk wa lahu al-hamd, wa Huwa 'ala kulli shay'in Qadir' [there is none worthy of worship but Allah; He has no partners; the kingdom is His, all praise is for Him, and He is Able to do all things]."

    http://alsiraat.co.uk/articles/tariq...t-people-earth

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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    A message from our dear brother Tariq Mehanna (may Allah release him):

    as-Salamu 'alaykum wa Rahmatullah wa Barakatuh.

    As we soon head into the blessed last ten nights of Ramadan, I ask you all to be keen each night in regards to our brothers & sisters around the world who are impoverished, sick, imprisoned, or putting their lives on the line each day in the struggle against ever-increasing international tyranny.

    As you awaken in the final hours of these nights and put your forehead to the ground in prostration, remember that Allah's Messenger (peace be upon him) said: "

    Indeed, Allah aids this ummah through its weak ones - through their supplications, prayers, and sincerity."

    Never, ever underestimate the power of your du'a' in alleviating the suffering of those halfway around the planet, or granting them victory...Was-Salam.

    Your brother,

    - Tariq

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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    May Allah hasten the release of all Muslim prisoners, ameen.

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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    Quote Originally Posted by ahaneefah View Post
    Recent photo of Tariq in his cell at the Terre Haute CMU, taken this past Ramadan:



    May Allah hasten his release. Ameen
    Brother, this link doesnt work. I'm keen to view the photo. Can you post a working link please or pm me and ill give you my email to send to please. JazakAllah.

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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)


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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    powerful writings

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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    Ameen
    And He found you lost and guided you,
    ~ Qur'an (Ad Duhaa) 93:7 ~

    Salaah Reminders

    Guide us to the straight.
    " Ihdina-s-sirata-l-mustaqim "
    ~ Quran 1:6 ~


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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    Recent photos of Tarek:




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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    Mash'Allah. He looks in good spirits, despite all that he has gone through.

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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    the noor on his face is amazing.

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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    Quote Originally Posted by Fadi View Post
    the noor on his face is amazing.
    Yeah indeed. He's been tested and he's been patient - they haven't broken him, and Insh'Allah, justice will be served and he will be released.

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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    may Allah make him a light in the darkness of that prison
    .لا نريد زعيما يخاف البيت الإبيض
    نريد زعيما يخاف الواحد الأحد
    دولة الإسلامية باقية






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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    ameen to all the dua's...

  36. #235
    Kamaa Tadeenu Tudaan Abu Mus'ab's Avatar
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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    Aameen.




    "Beware of the people of personal opinion (in Deeni matters), because the people of opinion are the enemy of the Sunnah, they were unable to safeguard the Ahaadeeth, so they speak (in matters of the Deen) with their opinion, so they go astray and they lead others astray."


    Hadhrat `Umar Ibn Al-Khattaab Radhiallaahu `Anhu.


    Forgive me if i appear harsh or tactless at time in my replies, I have a great amount of ghayrah for my deen, thus I am quickly angered when people mistreat it.

    Sisters: Please, do not send me pm's or wall messages if it's not for a necessity like a translation or a ruling etc, Jazaakunnallaahu Khayr.

  37. #236
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    Re: Message from our brother Tarek Mehanna (Abu Sabaayaa)

    http://iskandrani.wordpress.com/ - brother Tarek's blog.


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