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  1. #1
    odan OBL's Avatar
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    The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes





    Arabic Language Lesson 1 - Taught by Abu Taubah


    Subject is Arabic Language

    Arabic comes from the word Ara’ba عرب

    عرب Ar’aba is a word which has its own meaning; it means to ‘make something crystal clear so as to leave no doubt to what was implied’. Especially an emotion or a feeling. Also refers to particular people known as the Arabs.

    So when Allah says:

    Quran’nan Ar’abiyan – A recital that makes it crystal clear, that leaves no doubt as to what was implied.

    Quran – recital
    Arabiya – to make something crystal clear.

    It doesn’t mean an Arabic Quran; because you recited Arabic in Englishsized form.

    The scholars of Tawheed have proven that every mistake from every one of these deviant groups, they first deviated from making mistake in the Arabic language. Linguistic mistake was their first mistake.

    Definition of Language - those sounds that are shared by all people.

    Everybody has sounds that come of their tongue, (except animals who’s sounds come of their throat).

    Share same sounds, but meanings are different. An example would be the word ‘wow’, in English it means surprised/amazement but in the language of alaf, a (Senegalese language) it means ‘yes’. Pronounced the same exact way, but meaning differs because of the people share same sound, different meaning.

    How we got the Arabic Language


    Quran, authentic Hadith of the Prophet (first 2 proofs that have preserved the Arabic language)

    Then Poetry (prior to Islam), Educated writers amongst the Arabs who preserved the Arabic language. These are the proofs if someone asks why you say a certain word is said this way,answer would be because it was imitated this way passed down this way.

    Reason why poetry prior to Islam is because Arabs before Islam, best thing they had was their poetry, they would take their poetry and compete with the other Arabs, and best one would be hung up on the Kabbah, Mu’alaqat. 7 of the poems stayed up until Islam came, these are called the seven hanging poems.

    We call this Naqlan – meaning we got this passed down from father to son.

    In the Arabic language there are 13 sciences.

    Nahw and Sarf are the two important one’s amongst the 13.

    - Nahw – Grammar
    - Sarf – Etymology (ology- study of)

    Nahw – Grammar

    Grammar is the science through which we can understand and learn the changes that a word goes through based on the placement in a sentence, and the changes at the end of the word. Each time you place a sentence differently, the word will mean something different. This is grammar based on changes in word.

    Sarf – Etymology

    Sarf – Pronounced like the word ‘Saw’ that’s the sound ‘sarf’ mouth open not the س seen type of saw.

    Sarf means to give change, to break something down. Literally means to give change, as a terminology it is a science through which we understand the shape and change of a word before entering it into a sentence. The meaning of a word in of itself before we enter it into a sentence.

    There 35 shapes/scales of Arabic verb, each shape has its own individual meaning.

    Arabic has 2 things, the meaning of the word as a shape, and then it has the root meaning of the word.

    Example the word مسلم Muslim, mo’o in front of a word, whenever you have it means one who posses the qualities of the rest of the word, another example the word Munafiq.

    If we change the word and say Islam, this is another change in the word, put Alif with Kasra, which than means who who submits. Same way we have Muhlis, means one who is sincere. Word for sincere is Ikhlaas, which is the same exact shape. There are 35 of these in the Arabic language.

    3 types words in Arabic/ in every language.

    First one is Harf - this is a letter/also connector word.

    Second type is Filun – verb – an action word

    Third type is Ismun – super-noun – It’s a person/place/thing and also includes a description/adjective. Not a noun. Not same as the English noun,

    First Type Harf (3 parts)

    Harf - Letter and connectors (any word that points to a meaning in another word)

    a)Letters in the Arabic language – alif, baa, jaa, daa

    b) Connectors – Any word that points to a meaning, in another word and it’s not connected to a timeframe.

    Example the word ‘under’, under is a word that points to a meaning in something else, by itself it won’t have any meaning. Under what?, other words in, from, above, to.

    These are connectors without which you can’t make a sentence sound good. In Arabic you have similar words, min, waa.

    They don’t have a meaning in of itself. And it’s not connected to a timeframe.

    c)Letters with extra meaning, these are letters like the word Alif by itself is a Question, it means any sentence that has now been changed into a question that can only be answered by yes or no. In English we would say a’a and it would mean as,in,ae.

    Example I went to the store, to change to question you would say did you go to the store?

    In Quran Allah say’s Ra’ayta meaning you saw, to turn this into a question you would say A’ra’ayta. It's now Turned into a question.

    Other examples would be with letter Mo’o, mushrik,munafiq,mushrik. Mo’o before a word means who who posses.

    Second Type Filun - verb

    Is a word that points to a meaning, in and of itself and is connected to one of three time frames. Either immediate, either past, or present/future.

  2. #2
    *bıɟɐɹɯıɯɐʇpɐʎızɯɯn* .: Anna :.'s Avatar
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    .: Rufaida :.
    .:Fa Firroo Ila-llaah:.

    “People praise you for what they suppose is in you,
    but you must blame your soul for what you know is in you.”
    ~ Ibn Atallah


  3. #3
    odan OBL's Avatar
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 2 notes

    Arabic Language Lesson 2 - Taught by Abu Taubah

    3 Types of word in Arabic/ever language:

    First one is Harf - this is a letter/also connector word.

    Second type is Filun – verb – an action word.

    Third type is Ismun – super-noun – It’s a person/place/thing and also includes a description/adjective.

    Second Type Filun – Verb- An action word

    It is a word that points to a meaning, in and of itself (the word has it’s own meaning) and connected to one of three time frames:

    Either immediate, past or present/future.

    Examples:

    - Run – timeframe immediate.

    This is an order; an order denotes immediacy, unless a condition is put there. Any time you find an order in the Quran or the Sunnah it denotes immediacy.

    - Ran – timeframe past

    - Running – timeframe present/future.

    Reason why it’s present/future is because were in present tense now, and as were staying in the present were going into the future tense.

    Third Type Ismun– Supernoun

    Noun – Name of place/person or thing
    Super Noun – Name of place/person or thing + an adjective (description)

    In Arabic we can’t translate Ismun as a Noun, because it’s not a noun. Example the word pretty in English it is an adjective, in Arabic it will be an Ismun there is no other section for it to go under. All the adjectives are Ismun.

    An Ismun is a word that points to a meaning, in and of itself (means the word has it’s own meaning) and is not connected to a time frame.

    Example the word Masjid – It is word that points to a meaning in and of itself (the word has it’s own meaning) and is not connected to a timeframe.

    Eesaa – Is a word that points to meaning in and of itself, and is not connected to a timeframe.

    New York, Airplane, beautiful – these are all Ismun words in Arabic language that have meanings in itself and are not connected to a timeframe.

    Sarf – Etymology – breaking down of words.

    Ismun is the strongest out of the 3, you can’t make a sentence from a Harf. Example you can not say under, or in, from, around, behind, their words of Harf but they’re not Kalam (speech).

    You also can not make a sentence with just a Filun, example running; sat, standing they have no meaning by itself, you need an Ismun.

    But an Ismun in Arabic doesn’t need a Filun, and it doesn’t need a Harf. Because you can make a sentence

    As’sama’a Mobeen – the sky is clear.

    The word ‘is’ is implied.

    As’samao is a word that points to meaning in itself and is not connected to a timeframe, and so is Mobeen

    Both words are Ismun... Two Ismuns but you still have a full sentence. This is why Ismun is most powerful out of the 3.

    And if we do Sarf of the word Ismun we find that Ismun is from Sumuyi’ha, from it’s loftiness because it comes from the word Sky.

    ان ا لكلا م عند نا فلتستمع - In’nal Kalama Ind’ana, Faltastam’ee

    In’na – Is a word, means emphasis, emphasis the point. When put before a sentence it makes that sentence a verifiable fact.

    Al – Means the

    Also a Spanish word came from originally Arabic. From Muslim rule in Spain for over 800 yrs.

    Kalam – means speech, from the word Kalimah, which literally means A sound that you spit off your tongue that posses a meaning. Important part is it’s off your tongue. Reason being because animals make sounds through their throat, it’s not speech, speech is off the tongue. Only the humans and Jinn use their tongue.

    Ind’ana – Means according to us. Us here are the scholars of grammar not going to talk about what anybody else what they define speech as only going to talk about what scholars of grammar say. And it surrounds 3 words: Ismun, Filun, and Harf.

    Faltastam’ee - Fa is the Jawab – answer to this.

    It will be translated as ‘if you want to know what speech is according to us ‘people of grammar ‘fa’ than.

    Latasme’e - The laam here is called laam amr, it means an order so it means let them.

    Istam’e’e - The ta here in front of the word means ‘you’, rest of word is istima’a.

    The Ista’a in front of a word means to seek something, like when we astaghfirullah. Seeking forgivness.

    And the rest of word sama’aya, seen, meem, ayn means to hear. When you change it to ista’mee; seek to hear, it means to listen. So let him listen, meaning let him pay attention.

    The sentence will be translated as:

    If you want to know Kalam (speech) is according to ‘us’ the scholars of grammar than listen up.

    a) Harf - Letters


    Poem - With Basmalah & Hamdalah then blessings on the prophet.

    I’ll have my say with you today concerning orthographic. Description of their numerals, points of articulation as each one comes and as it does it has it’s own sensation.

    We start of ‘with’

    Basmalah (abbreviation) – means

    And then Hamdalah (abbreviation) – means

    Then we send the Salawat blessing on the prophet

    The Shaykh then say’s I’ll have my say with you today concerning orthographics.

    Ortho – from mouth
    Graphics – images/visual

    Orthogrpahics represents the visual images that come out from sound of your mouth. – talking about the alphabet.

    The letters are a visual image, of the sounds that come out your mouth.

    For a language to be totally orthographic there has to be a visual image representing every constant sound of that language.

    There are two types of sounds in every language. There’s a constant sound, and there’s a vowel sound.

    Vowels sounds – a’a, ee’ oo’

    In Arabic you have a graphine, you have a letter. E.g ba’a , and then you have a vowel sound, a’a. You put it together you have a sound ba’a

    What were going to learn about the Orthographics (Alphabet Letters)

    Description of their numerals, their points of articulation (Arabic words have 2 points of articulation. First point is the Mahraj, Mahraj is the point where it exits the way you say that letter. However outside of it’s Mahraj we have the Tajweed rule – the Tajweed rule is based on noon when its mixed with other letters you don’t say the noon. Example the word ar-rahman, there’s laam in there but we don’t say it.

    Points of articulation by itself – Mahraj
    and when mixed with other letters – Tajweed

    Those are the 2 points of articulation

    As each one comes and as it does each has its own sensation – the sensation of hearing the proper pronunciation, we have to learn to pronounce it properly in order for it to have the right effect it’s supposed to have.

    What you will learn about every letter:

    Description of the letter- description also determines how it looks when you write it.
    How to pronounce it.
    The numerals of the letter (Every Arabic letter has a numeric value).
    Last edited by OBL; 22-03-09 at 11:55 PM.

  4. #4
    scribble
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    I'm confused. =( So I was listening to the first one today, the Master letters part one, but it seemed as if he'd already mentioned stuff before I'd missed, then I was going through he was saying the classroom rules and then it cut off. =(

    So I dunno what I missed, and so I went to the second one and they had a quiz and the teacher was writing on the board the answers and I didn't have notes for some of the questions!

    Can you post the link that you got this from? It's just cause you can't scroll to where you wanna go to in the video, you have to start all over again.

  5. #5
    Odan RaineR's Avatar
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    omg i hate Na7o
    There is no such thing as an Israel,
    It is occupied-palestine


    Should the Jews have been given a homeland?

    YES...........in germany,

    the world should have given the jews germany as payment for the holocaust

  6. #6

  7. #7
    scribble
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    Oh I thought it was the ones on the Fiks website. =o

  8. #8
    *bıɟɐɹɯıɯɐʇpɐʎızɯɯn* .: Anna :.'s Avatar
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    oh are these dif than the ones on the fiks website?
    scribble u can scroll in the vids, once they start let it run a bit then it should be loading quicker than it plays u can skip fwd a bit? ive had to do that sometimes

    rainer! nooo nahw haters allowed in here
    .: Rufaida :.
    .:Fa Firroo Ila-llaah:.

    “People praise you for what they suppose is in you,
    but you must blame your soul for what you know is in you.”
    ~ Ibn Atallah


  9. #9
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    Ohh lol. It's real funny. =P Saw and saa... =P

    Hmm.. how many lessons are there on youtube? I wanna move onto the ones on the website. =o

  10. #10
    Odan RaineR's Avatar
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    Quote Originally Posted by .: Anna :. View Post
    oh are these dif than the ones on the fiks website?
    scribble u can scroll in the vids, once they start let it run a bit then it should be loading quicker than it plays u can skip fwd a bit? ive had to do that sometimes

    rainer! nooo nahw haters allowed in here
    i was quiet good at it in school but i hate it its sooooo boring
    There is no such thing as an Israel,
    It is occupied-palestine


    Should the Jews have been given a homeland?

    YES...........in germany,

    the world should have given the jews germany as payment for the holocaust

  11. #11
    *bıɟɐɹɯıɯɐʇpɐʎızɯɯn* .: Anna :.'s Avatar
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    It's not boring
    some teachers make things boring, but in reality its really fascinating
    like I used to find the scales boring and i was like blerh watever, i didnt really want to learn them (altho masha Allah my teachers were good, that was actually my own fault cos i was just more stupid @ that time ) but now i read some interesting stuff and im thinking like omg why didn't i pay attention properly before
    all these topics if you look at them in relation to Quran then they become extremely interesting, even if you didnt like the topic by itself before?
    anyway dont come in here and say boring u might put ppl off

    scribble thats really confusing the youtube and fiks ones are dif i thought it was same :s im gna try 2 check it out and understand what is where..
    .: Rufaida :.
    .:Fa Firroo Ila-llaah:.

    “People praise you for what they suppose is in you,
    but you must blame your soul for what you know is in you.”
    ~ Ibn Atallah


  12. #12
    *bıɟɐɹɯıɯɐʇpɐʎızɯɯn* .: Anna :.'s Avatar
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    oh okay the fiks site has only the ajrumiyya and master letters

    insha Allah we will organise the youtube links here so its easy to access everything, cos bit confusing just getting it from the makeen youtube page
    .: Rufaida :.
    .:Fa Firroo Ila-llaah:.

    “People praise you for what they suppose is in you,
    but you must blame your soul for what you know is in you.”
    ~ Ibn Atallah


  13. #13
    *bıɟɐɹɯıɯɐʇpɐʎızɯɯn* .: Anna :.'s Avatar
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    oh hmm i found some other lessons on youtube too, not looked at this dno if its as good as the fiks ones but here is link:

    http://www.youtube.com/user/muttaqi

    Lesson 3

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CCqgb...e=channel_page
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vqzgc...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aYH_Z...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WQgps...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tcSEh...eature=related

    Lesson 4

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hk1Me...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vclFy...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rJz_1...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8iRVb...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-9YI...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=li3mk...eature=related

    Lesson 5

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jGj9M...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AB_qc...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M2kAW...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YNj8U...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_inV...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RgKph...eature=related

    Lesson 6

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aYrm9...e=channel_page
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bW-iC...e=channel_page
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uk3rS...e=channel_page
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v1nII...e=channel_page
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lxk4X...e=channel_page

    insha Allah i will continue it later so we have everything linked clearly in this thread

    (btw obl if this is messing up ur notes, i can move all this to a dif thread and leave this only for notes? so please tell me if u prefer me to do tht?)
    .: Rufaida :.
    .:Fa Firroo Ila-llaah:.

    “People praise you for what they suppose is in you,
    but you must blame your soul for what you know is in you.”
    ~ Ibn Atallah


  14. #14
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    Ohh they're gonna have a quiz I want a quiz! =o

  15. #15
    odan OBL's Avatar
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    how many lessons are there on youtube? I wanna move onto the ones on the website. =o
    37 lessons.

    insha Allah i will continue it later so we have everything linked clearly in this thread

    (btw obl if this is messing up ur notes, i can move all this to a dif thread and leave this only for notes? so please tell me if u prefer me to do tht?)
    nah jus leave it as it is.. otherwise no one's gonna bother watching the video's if they're all posted into one long thread with nothing but utube links. this way people might read the notes and then refer back to the video in the same thread instead of having to go and search for it from another thread.
    Last edited by OBL; 24-03-09 at 01:12 PM.

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    *bıɟɐɹɯıɯɐʇpɐʎızɯɯn* .: Anna :.'s Avatar
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    okay cool
    .: Rufaida :.
    .:Fa Firroo Ila-llaah:.

    “People praise you for what they suppose is in you,
    but you must blame your soul for what you know is in you.”
    ~ Ibn Atallah


  17. #17
    odan OBL's Avatar
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 3 notes

    Arabic Language Lesson 3 - Taught by Abu Taubah

    Review:

    The difference between a:

    • Filun فعل
    • Harf خرف

    Filun verb- An action word

    Is a word that points to a meaning, in and of itself (means word has its own meaning) and is connected to one of three time frames. Either immediate, past, or present/future.

    Timeframe:

    Immediate: (Order, denotes immediacy unless condition put there)

    ا مر Am’r is an order, Amr. Amr is an order. That’s why the Ameerul mumineen is the one that gives the order.

    Past tense: Walked

    Present/Future: Walking

    From this example we know it’s a Filun because it can do these three things

    Harf Letter/connector word (because it connects the sentences)

    Any word that points to a meaning, in another word and it’s not connected to a timeframe.

    Example of connector words in English:

    In, to, from, with, under. In Arabic it’s min, ilah, wa’an, wa’fee, wa’rub’ba.

    The difference is Filun is an action word; a word that points to a meaning in and of itself, and it’s connected to a timeframe, whereas Harf is a word that points to a meaning, in another word and it’s not connected to a timeframe.

    Kalam is the plural of Kalimah, Kalimah literally means ‘word’.

    The technical meaning is: A sound that is spit of the tongue that posses a meaning. This excludes animals because their sounds come from their throat.

    The definition of Kalam is speech. Kalam is built on 3 types of words:

    • Filun – verb/action word
    • Harf – letter/connector word
    • Ismun – super-noun – name of person/ place/thing/ + adjective

    Speech is not complete until it is Mufeed (beneficial).

    Speech is not mufeed until the listen is not waiting for more to understand what was translated to him.

    What it means when we say , ‘meaning of in and itself’


    Means when the listener hears that word he’s not waiting for anything extra to understand what that word means, he doesn’t need anything else. So in and of itself you understand that word.

    Like the word hand, you do not need another word to understand what the objective is when speaker say’s hand.

    However Harf is a word that points to a meaning in another word, meaning it has no meaning of itself. Example the words to, from, under.

    ان ا لكلا م عند نا فلتستمع

    In’na al Kalama ind’ana faltastam’ee,

    If you want to know Kalam (speech) is according to the scholars of grammar than listen and pay attention.

    لفظ مركب مفيد قد و ضع

    Laf’thun muraqa’bun mufeedun, ka’ad wo’de

    It is Lafzun, it is a sound that you spit off your tongue that has a meaning,

    The rest of the definition Muraqab, Mufeed, Qad Wo’dee are the descriptions (adjectives) of what type of lafzth it is.

    It is a sound that is muraqab, muraqab is from the word ركب ra-qi-ba. This means to ride something.

    Mo’o before the word means ‘one who posses the qualities of the rest of the word that follows’ e.g muslim, munafiq, muhlis.

    Muraqab is to double something, so it doubles the meaning.

    Example the word Ali’ma – it means to know/he knew, if the word is strengthened to Al’lama it will now mean ‘he made known.’

    Add م meem before it, becomes Mu’alim. The teacher, one who makes It known.This is how you strengthen a word, you add the sha’da it strengthens the meaning

    Speech is of two types, literal and implied.

    Muraqa’bun – Means 2 words or more, one word in itself won’t make any sense.

    لفظ مركب

    It is a sound that you spit off your tongue that it compounded with 2 words or more.

    مفيد – Muf’feed (beneficial)

    Beneficial - means listener is not waiting to hear more.

    Example of لفظ مركب (Sound spit of tounge, and contains 2 words or more that is not مفيد – Muf’feed (beneficial)

    ‘’If the Imam comes’’

    It was لفظ Lafthun, a sound that you spit off your tongue.

    It was مركب Muraqab – 2 words or more.

    But it wasn’t مفيد – Muf’feed (beneficial).

    Not Mufeed because the listener is still waiting for more to understand the objective of the speaker.

    Example of لفظ مركب (Sound spit of tounge, and contains 2 words or more that is مفيد – Muf’feed (beneficial)

    ‘’If the Imam comes we pray’’

    It’s لفظ Lafthun, sound that you spit off your tongue.

    It’s مركب Muraqab – 2 words or more.

    It’s مفيد – Muf’feed (beneficial).

    Because the listener is not waiting for more to understand the objective of the speaker.

    قد و ضع

    Ka’ad wo’dee – kad corresponds directly to the word ‘already’ in English language, that before all this it is wo’dee, wo’dee had 2 meanings. Literally it means placed. As terminology it has 2 meanings that do not oppose each other, first one means intended, 2nd one accordance to rules of Arabic grammar. So if you speak in Bengali, English, or urdu according to ‘us’ scholars of grammar it is not speech. It is only speech if we talk in Arabic and it has to be intended:

    Full Definition :

    ان ا لكلا م عند نا فلتستمع

    In’na al Kalama ind’ana faltastam’ee,

    If you want to know Kalam (speech) is according to the scholars of grammar than listen and pay attention.

    لفظ مركب مفيد قد و ضع

    It is:

    - A sound that is spit of the tip of the tongue
    - That is Mura’qab (2 words or more, they could be literal or implied)
    - That is Muf’eed (Beneficial), means listener is not waiting to hear more to understand objective of speech.
    - And it has to be intended, Ka’ad.. Already put and placed grammatically in Arabic form and it’s intended. There are no actions without intention.

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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    You can watch the lessons in full here:
    http://thefiks.blip.tv/rss

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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    that looks like the same ones which are on the main fiks website? but the first arabic lessons r not on it, its only ajrumiyyah and master letters series? which i think is dif class?
    .: Rufaida :.
    .:Fa Firroo Ila-llaah:.

    “People praise you for what they suppose is in you,
    but you must blame your soul for what you know is in you.”
    ~ Ibn Atallah


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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 4 notes

    Arabic Language Lesson 4 - Taught by Abu Taubah

    Review:

    ان ا لكلا م عند نا فلتستمع

    (In’na al Kalama Ind’ana faltastam’ee)

    The technical definition of this is:

    The fact of the matter is that Kalam, speech, according to the scholars of grammar, is…. so listen carefully…

    لفظ مركب مفيد قد و ضع

    (Laf’thun muraqa’bun mufeedun, ka’ad wo’de)

    It is a sound that is spit of the tip of the tongue, a verbalization consisting of two words or more, it must benefit the listener to the point that he is no longer in need of more words, In order to understand the objective of the speaker. At the same time it must conform to the rules of Arabic grammar as well as being intended.

    If any portion of this definition is not present then you do not have ‘Kalam’ (speech).

    *Memorize the Arabic text and the definition.

    2nd Part of Lesson: Arabic Alphabet:

    ا ب ج ر

    This is called Abu’Jaad or Ab’Jad

    Ab’Jad came from Abu Ja’ad.

    In it you have the first 3 letters of the Arabic alphabet. Alif,Baa,Jeem,Da’al. This is the original way of the Arabic Alphabet

    The Arabic alphabet letters come in words of a story of 6 Kings, their names were:

    Abu’Jad
    Hawaz
    Ha’tee or Hut’ee
    Kalmoon or Kalman
    Sa’faas
    Qoo’rishat.

    These were the 6 kings and they were oppressors. This story can be found in the book ‘Al Fihrist’. Their names were used to establish the alphabet.

    This is not from a Hadith, it is an ancient fabal on how the Arabic language started, but it is the only established method which the alphabet in any language has started worldwide.

    'Al Fihris' means a table of contents, or a compilation of all the Arabic source literature before the advent of the Christian and Greeks philosophy was added into Arabic Literature. They wanted to preserve it to stop it from getting mixed up, from amongst it was the story of the Arabic alphabet.

    First Letter ا Alif


    Alif – also called the stubborn letter because it doesn’t join/connect to another letter.Example the word با

    The Alif doesn’t connect to other words, but it allows words to be connected before it, but not after it. That’s why its stubborn letter it won’t go to any other letter.

    Alif is a one stroke letter ا

    Or if you’re writing from another letter you bring it up. با

    Rule – Alif always comes after a Fatha, and at end of word, usually an action verb.

    When you look in the Quran, you will find not (except very rarely) the Alif come except after a Fatha.

    Or the Alif will come at the end of a word and it will have a small mark over it, a small circle. It’s there to let you know if word has ended, it’s called Alif Fariqah.

    For Example the word قا لو ا

    What we have from the Greeks, Romans and the Jews they all took their alphabet from the Arabs, it all follows this formula.

    The Alif is there just to let you know that the word has ended.

    Along with Alif comes another letter, but it’s attached to Alif. For example when you say Alif, you mean Hamza and you also mean Alif.

    But when you say Hamza, you mean Hamza & Hamza (2 types of Hamza’s.)

    One is called Hamza Waslee, and the other one is called Hamza Qat -ee.

    Hamza Waslee joins the previous vowel sound to the next constant sound. For example و العسر

    The sign on the Alif joins the Wa’a to the Laam.

    But when you have this word سا ل Sa’a’la. It’s not joining because the sign on the Alif it cuts and makes its own sound.

    Or if you have the word مو من Mu’min, the Hamza on the W’a’a it cuts in and makes it’s own sound.

    ‘Alif is the first of signs it’s mahraj hard to find’

    A Mahraj is from the meem haa-ra-ja. Meem in front of the word means a place, example Masjid – a palce of sajdah.

    Mahraj is a place of Haraj.

    In English we have a word that get’s it meaning from same word Haraj, it’s called خر ا ج

    Garage, a place that you exit out of.. Likewise the Mahraj the place that we leave that sound, a place of enunciation, that place is in our mouth some place.

    There are two types of Mahraj:

    - First type is one where you can put your finger on other on it. Like ba’a, or I’b’b the Mahraj is coming from the two lips.

    Alif is the first of signs it’s Mahraj hard to find.

    You can not put your finger on the Mahraj, example the word A’a, e’e’ o’o, sound is coming from deep inside your mouth somewhere from the bottom. That’s why it’s Mahraj is hard to find.

    There are two types of Mahraj, one where you can put your finger on, other one you cannot. Alif has one where you cannot put your finger on it.

    ‘And deep inside my mouth I find a Hamza lives inside’

    Means when you referring you Alif, also referring to Hamza, deep inside mouth because the sound of Hamza comes from deep inside.

    ‘With Ith’dhar, yes the Alif is itself and also Hamza’


    Each letter has a Tajweed rule, Tajweed rule for Alif is Ith’dhar.

    ‘While Hamza is itself nought itself, that’s it jus Hamza Hamza’

    Means Hamza Qat-ee, and Hamza Waslee.

    ‘Loud and strong, while low retrained opening sifat (characteristics)’


    These are siffat characteristics/description of Alif.

    Alif is loud and strong, the letter a’a say it with strength.

    While at the same time low, what it means when it say’s low, your tongue has to be flat in your mouth.

    Low restrained means you can restrain the air.

    And opening, there’s 2 types of mouth opening and closing.

    The Alif comes along with madd, jus following a fath. Or shows up at the ends of words right before they crash separates and demarcates to help the reader past. (this is the Alif fariqa)

    While Hamza as it seems to be as tad moor of a shayr (explanation), it rides upon the alif, waw, and even ya.

    Examples:

    سا ل Sa’a’la. – The Hamza on the Alif.

    مو من Mu’min, the Hamza on the W’a’a.

    Shid’datun with Jahrun, samtun, istifa’al fathun desribes Alifun and one it’s numeral.

    Every Arabic letter has a numeric value, numeric value of Alif is one.

    'Shid’datun with Jahrun, samtun, istifa’al fathun'


    These are all the description of Alif, these are the terminologies in Arabic.

    Shida’tun – strength
    Jahrun – Loudness
    Samtun – Restraint
    Istifa’al – tongue low
    Fathun – Open mouth wide

  21. #21
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes



    Arabic class notes - Lesson 05:
    ٠ ١ ٢ ٣ ٤ ٥ ٦ ٧ ٨ ٩

    Sifr Wahid ithnan thalaltha arba'a khamsa sitta saba'a thamanya tis'a. [right to left]

    Review:

    ARABIC
    ||
    ||
    13 sciences under it
    || ||
    Nahw نحو Sarf صرف

    NAHW(grammar) & SARF (etymology)
    || ||
    Three words
    || || ||
    Ismun اسم Fi'lun فعل Harfun حرف
    (super noun) (action word/verb) (connector/letters)



    حرف
    ||
    Smallest compound in the Arabic language
    ||
    Broken down into three parts
    || || ||
    Basic letter / Letters with meaning / Connector
    || || ||

    LETTERS WITH MEANINGS / CONNECTOR
    Letters such as mu / ila, min etc

    BASIC LETTER
    AbJad
    Hawaz
    Hutti
    Kalamun
    Saa’fas
    qurishat
    thakhath
    Dathagh
    A connector is a letter
    that points to a meaning in another word and is not connected to a time frame

  22. #22
    scribble
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    BTW I didn't finish this, I couldn't. =P I'll finish it later inshaallah!

  23. #23
    scribble
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes



    (from the letters than mean something)

    The ING rule:
    فتح
    = Open
    Add an ا and you get:
    فاتح = OpenING.
    علم = Knowledge
    عالم = Knowing

    All the letters of meaning is under the statement "Today I forget them" or "you ask me them" (will get to that later)

    ان ا لكلا م عند نا فلتستمع
    لفظ مركب مفيد قد و ضع


    اقسامه التى عليها يبن
    اسم و فعل ثم حرف معن

    اقسامه = قسم = divisions/parts so اقسامه is the plural, meaning it's parts, but the hu is ha al kinaya, it means the ha that refers to something else. It refers to the last thing mentioned. Innal kalam, the words, the parts of kalam. Or kalam is divided into:
    التى = she/it
    عليها = upon it
    يبن = to be build. = بنيان = buildings. But the words come from بنى and ابن meaning building the progeny. (ابن = sons بنى = tribes)

    Therefore;

    The parts of speech (kalam) that it is build on... (literal meaning)
    Speech is divided and built upon...

    اسم = super noun
    و فعل = and a verb
    ثم = then. The ulema say there's a break, this shows that the one that comes after this is weaker than the other two before.
    حرف معن = A letter that comes with a meaning. This does not include all the letters, it only includes those that include a meaning.

    *********************


    Master Letters: ب

    What we'll learn about this letter:

    Description:
    Numerical value:
    Makhraj:
    Tajweed rule:
    How to pronounce it:


    Jahrun (loud) and shiddah (strong), two sifaat (characteristic) shared by baa
    Like istifaal (low) and infitaah (open like a door) it's numeral ithnaan (2)
    When baa the letter shows up right after noon:
    Saakinah*1 or tanweena*2 Iqlaabun*3 is the rule.
    With dhalaqun*4 - fly off the lips, It's makhraj is the same
    With qalqala*5 resounding loud, the baa blurts out its name.


    *1 Noon is saakin when there's no vowel sound, the noon saakinah is a written noon

    *2 Tanween is: fathataan dhammataan and khasrataan

    *3 When the baa is followed up right after a noon, the sound of meem comes in but the meem isn't pronounced clearly until you get to the baa. (watch the video for better explanation)

    *4 Is a description of any letter that comes off the lips

    *5 like zalzala (any word in Arabic that has a four letter root) is a sound word, meaning it's a beating sound that has a meaning attached to the sound. The sound repeats itself. Resounding.

    Alhamdulillah end of lesson 05. ! =D
    Last edited by .: Anna :.; 06-04-09 at 02:06 PM.

  24. #24
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes



    Mnemonic: Something used to help you remember.
    Qalqala: Mnemonic and Mistakes


    Qalqala is best described as an “echo noise” or “bouncing noise”. There are five qalqala letters. If any of them appears with a sukoon on top, you perform qalqala. (Prime example, if you have no idea what qalqala is: the end of the last word of every verse in Surah Ikhlass.)

    Qalqala letters: qaff (ق), ba (ب), taw (ط), jeem (ج), and dal (د).

    The mnemonic to remember them is “qutb jadd” (قطب جَدّ). Qutb means “pole”, jadd means “grandfather”. Grandfather pole…

    Some letters are easy to do qalqala on — even qaris (reciters) make mistakes on them! Learn them and avoid them. (To stop yourself from doing a qalala on a letter, simply stop on the letter.)

    Common qalala mistakes: ‘ayn (ع), daad (ض), ta (ت), and kaf (ك)


    [source]

    Alhamdulillah, I was just browsing the website, and found this. =)

  25. #25
    scribble
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    I'm sorry, I have a typo, it's meant to be Iqlaabun. =o Whoops..

  26. #26
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    sis

    which post is the typo i can edit for you? but i didnt see it when i looked in last few posts?
    .: Rufaida :.
    .:Fa Firroo Ila-llaah:.

    “People praise you for what they suppose is in you,
    but you must blame your soul for what you know is in you.”
    ~ Ibn Atallah


  27. #27
    scribble
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    It's the one just above that one, where it's the poem in bold. =)

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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    done
    .: Rufaida :.
    .:Fa Firroo Ila-llaah:.

    “People praise you for what they suppose is in you,
    but you must blame your soul for what you know is in you.”
    ~ Ibn Atallah


  29. #29
    scribble
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    Oh I've just realised I should put the entire meaning of the sentence down after breaking the meanings word by word.. =o I guess I forget because I'm watching it and it makes sense to me.

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    *bıɟɐɹɯıɯɐʇpɐʎızɯɯn* .: Anna :.'s Avatar
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    you can add it insha Allah?
    i think these classes it seems like its important to actually watch it, not just rely on someone's notes...
    like more so than the tafseer
    insha Allah i gta get round to listening to them
    .: Rufaida :.
    .:Fa Firroo Ila-llaah:.

    “People praise you for what they suppose is in you,
    but you must blame your soul for what you know is in you.”
    ~ Ibn Atallah


  31. #31
    scribble
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    Buuuump bump. If you want me to do lesson 6 I will do.

  32. #32
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    yeh u shud iA
    .: Rufaida :.
    .:Fa Firroo Ila-llaah:.

    “People praise you for what they suppose is in you,
    but you must blame your soul for what you know is in you.”
    ~ Ibn Atallah


  33. #33
    scribble
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    Okay sis I will do. =)

  34. #34
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes



    Arabic class 06:

    Review:

    Alif is the first of signs it's makhraj hard to find
    And deep inside my mouth I find a hamza lives inside
    With idhar yes, the alif is itself and also hamza
    While Hamza is itself nought else, that's it just Hamza Hamza
    Loud and strong, while low retrained opening sifaat
    The alif comes along with madd following a fath
    Or shows up at the ends of words right before they crash
    Separates and demarcates to help the reader pass
    While Hamza as it seems to be as tad more of a shahr (explanation)
    It rides upon the alif, waw, and even ya.
    Shid’datun wa Jahrun, samtun, istifa’al
    Fathun descripes alifun, one it's numeral.

    Alif: Tajweed rule for alif is idhar. Alif is a general term for alif and hamza, and there are two types of hamza: Hamzatul wasli (which joins) and hamzatul qat-ee (which cuts). Numeric value is 1. Alif comes with madd and fath.

    There types of word: F'ilun, Ismun and Harf. Harf is of three parts; basic letters, letters with meaning and connectors.

    For each basic letter we should know;
    • The sifaat, its description/characteristics
    • The makhraj, its pronounciation.
    • The tajweed rule.
    • Numeric value.


    With basmalah and hamdalah
    Then blessing on the Prophet
    I'll have my say
    With you today
    Concerning orthogrpahics
    Descriptions of its numeral
    Points of articulation
    As each one comes
    and as it does
    It has its own sensation


    Baa:

    Jahrun (loud) and shiddah (strong), two sifaat (characteristic) shared by baa
    Like istifaal (low) and infitaah (open like a door) it's numeral ithnaan (2)
    When baa the letter shows up right after noon:
    Saakinah or tanweena Iqlaabun is the rule.
    With dhalaqun - fly off the lips, It's makhraj is the same
    With qalqala resounding loud, the baa blurts out its name.

    Baa's numeric value is 2, it's sifaat is jahrun and shidda. Tajweed rule is qalqala as well as a sifaat. When it (baa) shows up after a noon saakinah (written noon that has no vowel sound written over it) or tanween (dhamataan, fathataan and khrasrataan - the sound of a noon) the tajweed rule is iqlaabun. Dhalaqun is another sifaat which means it flies off the lips, in turn that is its makhraj - it blurts out its name.
    Last edited by scribble; 12-04-09 at 03:51 PM.

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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    Wow, nice thread

  36. #36
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes



    Arabic class 06:

    Review:

    Alif is the first of signs it's makhraj hard to find
    And deep inside my mouth I find a hamza lives inside
    With idhar yes, the alif is itself and also hamza
    While Hamza is itself nought else, that's it just Hamza Hamza
    Loud and strong, while low retrained opening sifaat
    The alif comes along with madd following a fath
    Or shows up at the ends of words right before they crash
    Separates and demarcates to help the reader pass
    While Hamza as it seems to be as tad more of a shahr (explanation)
    It rides upon the alif, waw, and even ya.
    Shid’datun wa Jahrun, samtun, istifa’al
    Fathun descripes alifun, one it's numeral.

    Alif: Tajweed rule for alif is idhar. Alif is a general term for alif and hamza, and there are two types of hamza: Hamzatul wasli (which joins) and hamzatul qat-ee (which cuts). Numeric value is 1. Alif comes with madd and fath.

    There types of word: F'ilun, Ismun and Harf. Harf is of three parts; basic letters, letters with meaning and connectors.

    For each basic letter we should know;
    • The sifaat, its description/characteristics
    • The makhraj, its pronounciation.
    • The tajweed rule.
    • Numeric value.


    With basmalah and hamdalah
    Then blessing on the Prophet
    I'll have my say
    With you today
    Concerning orthogrpahics
    Descriptions of its numeral
    Points of articulation
    As each one comes
    and as it does
    It has its own sensation


    Baa:

    Jahrun (loud) and shiddah (strong), two sifaat (characteristic) shared by baa
    Like istifaal (low) and infitaah (open like a door) it's numeral ithnaan (2)
    When baa the letter shows up right after noon:
    Saakinah or tanweena Iqlaabun is the rule.
    With dhalaqun - fly off the lips, It's makhraj is the same
    With qalqala resounding loud, the baa blurts out its name.

    Baa's numeric value is 2, it's sifaat is jahrun and shidda. Tajweed rule is qalqala as well as a sifaat. When it (baa) shows up after a noon saakinah (written noon that has no vowel sound written over it) or tanween (dhamataan, fathataan and khrasrataan - the sound of a noon) the tajweed rule is iqlaabun. Dhalaqun is another sifaat which means it flies off the lips, in turn that is its makhraj - it blurts out its name.

    Jeem:

    Mix qalqala with samtun, then a fathun istifaal
    Add shidda to a jahrun, an a jeemun has began
    Complete the jeemun using just the middle of the tongue
    Then raise it up ENUNCIATE the jeemun should be done
    The quantitative measure for the ikhfaa in the jeem
    Is that its equal to a one that's just been multiplied by three

    Qalqala, samtun, fathun, shidda and jahrun - these are the sifaat of the letter jeem.

    Qalqala is a beating sound, eg: Al Hajj
    Samtun is a type of restrain at the end. Istifaal, the tongue should be low.
    Shidda - the jeem should be said with strength
    Jahrun - loud

    The above are the sifaat, which is why he says the jeemun has BEGAN. The next thing is the makhraj.

    The jeem is pronounced by the wetness of the middle of the tongue reaching the top and then it has to be removed so the sound comes out. "Then raise it up" The sound comes through separation of the tongue from the top of the mouth. "enunciate" which is the samtun. "the quantitative meausure" = the amount, the numeric value for the "ikhfaa" (which is its tajweed rule) 3. 1x3 = 3.

    ****************************

    ان ا لكلا م عند نا فلتستمع
    لفظ مركب مفيد قد و ضع
    اقسامه التى عليها يبن
    اسم و فعل ثم حرف معن

    فالاسم بالخفضى و بالتنوين أو
    دخول ال يعرف فاقفوا ما قفوا
    Last edited by scribble; 12-04-09 at 04:12 PM.

  37. #37
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    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    Quote Originally Posted by scribble View Post


    Arabic class 06:

    Review:

    Alif is the first of signs it's makhraj hard to find
    And deep inside my mouth I find a hamza lives inside
    With idhar yes, the alif is itself and also hamza
    While Hamza is itself nought else, that's it just Hamza Hamza
    Loud and strong, while low retrained opening sifaat
    The alif comes along with madd following a fath
    Or shows up at the ends of words right before they crash
    Separates and demarcates to help the reader pass
    While Hamza as it seems to be as tad more of a shahr (explanation)
    It rides upon the alif, waw, and even ya.
    Shid’datun wa Jahrun, samtun, istifa’al
    Fathun descripes alifun, one it's numeral.

    Alif: Tajweed rule for alif is idhar. Alif is a general term for alif and hamza, and there are two types of hamza: Hamzatul wasli (which joins) and hamzatul qat-ee (which cuts). Numeric value is 1. Alif comes with madd and fath.

    There types of word: F'ilun, Ismun and Harf. Harf is of three parts; basic letters, letters with meaning and connectors.

    For each basic letter we should know;
    • The sifaat, its description/characteristics
    • The makhraj, its pronounciation.
    • The tajweed rule.
    • Numeric value.


    With basmalah and hamdalah
    Then blessing on the Prophet
    I'll have my say
    With you today
    Concerning orthogrpahics
    Descriptions of its numeral
    Points of articulation
    As each one comes
    and as it does
    It has its own sensation


    Baa:

    Jahrun (loud) and shiddah (strong), two sifaat (characteristic) shared by baa
    Like istifaal (low) and infitaah (open like a door) it's numeral ithnaan (2)
    When baa the letter shows up right after noon:
    Saakinah or tanweena Iqlaabun is the rule.
    With dhalaqun - fly off the lips, It's makhraj is the same
    With qalqala resounding loud, the baa blurts out its name.

    Baa's numeric value is 2, it's sifaat is jahrun and shidda. Tajweed rule is qalqala as well as a sifaat. When it (baa) shows up after a noon saakinah (written noon that has no vowel sound written over it) or tanween (dhamataan, fathataan and khrasrataan - the sound of a noon) the tajweed rule is iqlaabun. Dhalaqun is another sifaat which means it flies off the lips, in turn that is its makhraj - it blurts out its name.

    Jeem:

    Mix qalqala with samtun, then a fathun istifaal
    Add shidda to a jahrun, an a jeemun has began
    Complete the jeemun using just the middle of the tongue
    Then raise it up ENUNCIATE the jeemun should be done
    The quantitative measure for the ikhfaa in the jeem
    Is that its equal to a one that's just been multiplied by three

    Qalqala, samtun, fathun, shidda and jahrun - these are the sifaat of the letter jeem.

    Qalqala is a beating sound, eg: Al Hajj
    Samtun is a type of restrain at the end. Istifaal, the tongue should be low.
    Shidda - the jeem should be said with strength
    Jahrun - loud

    The above are the sifaat, which is why he says the jeemun has BEGAN. The next thing is the makhraj.

    The jeem is pronounced by the wetness of the middle of the tongue reaching the top and then it has to be removed so the sound comes out. "Then raise it up" The sound comes through separation of the tongue from the top of the mouth. "enunciate" which is the samtun. "the quantitative meausure" = the amount, the numeric value for the "ikhfaa" (which is its tajweed rule) 3. 1x3 = 3.

    ****************************

    ان ا لكلا م عند نا فلتستمع
    لفظ مركب مفيد قد و ضع
    اقسامه التى عليها يبن
    اسم و فعل ثم حرف معن

    فالاسم بالخفضى و بالتنوين أو
    دخول ال يعرف فاقفوا ما قفوا

    فالاسم بالخفضى و بالتنوين أو
    دخول ال يعرف فاقفوا ما قفوا

    Ismun can be recognised how?

    The first thing he says is لخفضى which means something low, the opposite high. As a terminology it is a khasra or anything in place of a khasra. Nahw is the change of a word after it's entered into a word and the last radical and its changes. A dhamma has a particular reason for being at the end of a word. Fathah has a particular reason for being there as well as a kharsa has its own reason but the reasons are not the same. If there is a word has a dhamma on it then with specification we understand what the word means literally and as a grammatical statement. The asl = the fundamental is dhamma if a word has this the word is correct if it does not then there has to be a reason for the change. لخفضى is pointing to the kharsa, it is telling us that the khasra doesn't come on any other type of word except a ismun. An ismun is a type of word that points to a meaning of in and of itself that is not connected a time frame.

    فاقفوا ما قفوا

    Arabic language is نقلاً which means it is passed down from father to son. Memorise the rules and utilize the rules, because the Qur'an and the hadith as well as the poems of Arabic language have preserved it.

    لتنوين

    A dhammataan, khasrataan and fathataan will only be found in an ismun.

    Alhamdulillah end of lesson .. what lesson? =/ 6. =P
    Last edited by scribble; 12-04-09 at 04:28 PM.

  38. #38
    scribble
    Guests

    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    I've listened to the next class alhamdulillah, I will write notes soon insha Allah.

  39. #39
    scribble
    Guests

    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes



    Arabic class 07:

    Daal:

    Now take the tip and upper part
    Of that thing you call tongue
    And press it on your two buck teeth
    And place it on your gums
    Add Jahrun with the shidda
    Some fathun, istifaal
    Samtun and then qalqala
    Add four and we have daal
    But when reciting Al Quran
    A rule you must adhere (to)
    When the daal comes after 'an' (noon saakinah + tanween)
    Ikhfaau (tajweed rule) must be there

    ***************

    Al Ajrumiyya: scientific breakdown of the Arabic language through its grammar. (the text we've been going through with sulayman jamzuri)

    ان ا لكلا م عند نا فلتستمع
    لفظ مركب مفيد قد و ضع
    اقسامه التى عليها يبن
    اسم و فعل ثم حرف معن

    فالاسم بالخفضى و بالتنوين أو دوخول أل
    يعرف فاقفوا ما قفوا



    * Sorry I wrote it a bit funny last time, it's a full sentence like that..

    ان ا لكلا م عند نا فلتستمع
    If you want to know what speech is according to the scholars of grammar, then listen up.

    لفظ مركب مفيد قد و ضع

    (kalam is) Sound that is spit of the tongue consisting of more than two words that is beneficial so that the listener is not waiting for more to understand and words that are said in Arabic with intention of speech (so it's not said lazily, it's meant)

    اقسامه التى عليها يبن

    Kalam is made up for three types (divided)

    اسم و فعل ثم حرف معن
    Ismun (super noun - noun + adjective), Fi'lun (verb/action word) and THEN letters with meaning.

    فالاسم بالخفضى و بالتنوين أو دوخول أل
    يعرف فاقفوا ما قفوا


    How to identify an ismun:

    Ismun
    (has EITHER or ( أو دوخول أل يعرف ))

    || 1 ||
    الخفضى
    Something low (the khasra at the end of the word)
    || 2 ||
    تنوين
    The sound of noon as it comes at the end of an ismun/ khasrataan/fathataan/dhamataan



    فاقفوا ما قفوا
    Follow the path of the people who went before in learning this science.

    I know it's pretty brief I'll go more into it insha Allah.

  40. #40
    scribble
    Guests

    Re: The Fiks - Arabic lesson 1 notes

    bump.

    We're using the youtube videos... go back to first page.


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